Extreme Islam: anti-American propaganda of Muslim fundamentalism

A book about Muslim fundamentalists and anti-American terrorism could hardly be timelier. This lively, somewhat scattershot collection of let-’em-speak-for-themselves selections from disparate sources contains a wide spectrum of perspectives on Islam. Outstanding (which is not to say good) entries include a manifesto from TempleMountFaithfull.org, and an excerpt from the 1963 book Occidentosis (i.e., “A plague from the West”). Of the former, let it be indicative that it emanates from “the website for all Zionists and Zionist Christians who wish to demolish [the] Dome of the Rock,” thereby hastening Armageddon. The latter considers the “effete” and “effeminate” qualities of the “occidentotic” person, consumed by fear and vain concerns. Poems, polemics, and impassioned pleas are all here, and the swatch of color illustrations decorates nicely. The book throughout shows signs–bad grammar, typos, blind references–of being hurried into print in the wake of 9-11. Despite serious shortcomings, the collection’s showcase of excessive, occasionally disturbing points of view should find a significant readership.

Text: Parfrey Adam, Gardell Mattias. pp. 317; paperback. Publisher: Feral House, Port Townsend, 2001.

ISBN: 9780922915781| 0922915784

 20,00

Product price:
Additional options total:
Order total:
ID: 12499

Product Description

A book about Muslim fundamentalists and anti-American terrorism could hardly be timelier. This lively, somewhat scattershot collection of let-’em-speak-for-themselves selections from disparate sources contains a wide spectrum of perspectives on Islam. Outstanding (which is not to say good) entries include a manifesto from TempleMountFaithfull.org, and an excerpt from the 1963 book Occidentosis (i.e., “A plague from the West”). Of the former, let it be indicative that it emanates from “the website for all Zionists and Zionist Christians who wish to demolish [the] Dome of the Rock,” thereby hastening Armageddon. The latter considers the “effete” and “effeminate” qualities of the “occidentotic” person, consumed by fear and vain concerns. Poems, polemics, and impassioned pleas are all here, and the swatch of color illustrations decorates nicely. The book throughout shows signs–bad grammar, typos, blind references–of being hurried into print in the wake of 9-11. Despite serious shortcomings, the collection’s showcase of excessive, occasionally disturbing points of view should find a significant readership.

×