Kishin Shinoyama. Hareta Hi [A Fine Day]

Shinoyama began his career as a successful advertising photographer beginning in the mid-1960s and gained further notice in 1966 with infamous photos of writer Yukio Mishima, some of which were displayed in huge format to outraged shoppers in a Tokyo department store. He remains one of Japan’s most successful commercial photographers. Hareta Hi is essentially a series of impeccably sequenced, allusive photo-essays whose subject matter ranges from close-ups of politicians in mid-speech to a typhoon striking an offshore archipelago, to a defeated boxer, and brooding landscapes subjected to extreme environmental conditions. The full and double page bleeds are printed in deep color that flirts with saturation; the pages contain no text whatsoever. Appended at the book’s end is single page of brief annotations for each twenty-three series. We read at the very bottom of this page that all of the pictures were taken in 1974; a closer reading of the annotations reveals that they span just seven months of that year. So, this is, in some wonderfully abstruse way, a work of history, a highly subjective yearbook or photo-almanac. At times Shinoyama’s sequencing is cinematic, demonstrating the photobook’s ability to depict temporal flow; while at others it is precisely anti-cinematic, arresting both time and space. The book covers so much ground stylistically that it can be seen as an extended treatise on the myriad of possibilities inherent in photographic seeing.

pp. 348; 230 COL; hardcover. Publisher: Heibonsha, Tokyo , 1975.

Request info
ID: 13243

Product Description

Shinoyama began his career as a successful advertising photographer beginning in the mid-1960s and gained further notice in 1966 with infamous photos of writer Yukio Mishima, some of which were displayed in huge format to outraged shoppers in a Tokyo department store. He remains one of Japan’s most successful commercial photographers. Hareta Hi is essentially a series of impeccably sequenced, allusive photo-essays whose subject matter ranges from close-ups of politicians in mid-speech to a typhoon striking an offshore archipelago, to a defeated boxer, and brooding landscapes subjected to extreme environmental conditions. The full and double page bleeds are printed in deep color that flirts with saturation; the pages contain no text whatsoever. Appended at the book’s end is single page of brief annotations for each twenty-three series. We read at the very bottom of this page that all of the pictures were taken in 1974; a closer reading of the annotations reveals that they span just seven months of that year. So, this is, in some wonderfully abstruse way, a work of history, a highly subjective yearbook or photo-almanac. At times Shinoyama’s sequencing is cinematic, demonstrating the photobook’s ability to depict temporal flow; while at others it is precisely anti-cinematic, arresting both time and space. The book covers so much ground stylistically that it can be seen as an extended treatise on the myriad of possibilities inherent in photographic seeing.

×