Walking the High Line

With a large-format camera and an eye for the subtle light of cloudy days, photographer Sternfeld (Stranger Passing) documents the High Line, an elevated railway running along the western edge of Manhattan for just over a mile. The tracks, which have been derelict for more than 20 years, once carried freight to the warehouses and shipping yards along the Hudson. Though the urban landscape is evident billboards, apartment buildings, and warehouses surround the tracks in each shot Sternfeld’s focus is on the wildness that now overtakes the High Line, his angles emphasizing the road before him as it sprouts bristling weeds and scrawny trees, or softens into patches of clover, buttercups, and grape hyacinths. Taken from May 2000 to July 2001, the photographs capture the seasonal changes of this surprisingly undisturbed space. Two essays follow the 24 color plates; Harvard history and landscape professor John Stilgoe obliquely considers the idea of discovery, while New Yorker writer Adam Gopnik offers a brief history of the elevated railway, with comments by Sternfeld.

cm 26×21,5; pp. 72; 24 COL e 5 BW ills.; hardcover. Publisher: Steidl Verlag, Göttingen, 2012.

ISBN: 9783882437263| 388243726X

ID: 14550

Product Description

With a large-format camera and an eye for the subtle light of cloudy days, photographer Sternfeld (Stranger Passing) documents the High Line, an elevated railway running along the western edge of Manhattan for just over a mile. The tracks, which have been derelict for more than 20 years, once carried freight to the warehouses and shipping yards along the Hudson. Though the urban landscape is evident billboards, apartment buildings, and warehouses surround the tracks in each shot Sternfeld’s focus is on the wildness that now overtakes the High Line, his angles emphasizing the road before him as it sprouts bristling weeds and scrawny trees, or softens into patches of clover, buttercups, and grape hyacinths. Taken from May 2000 to July 2001, the photographs capture the seasonal changes of this surprisingly undisturbed space. Two essays follow the 24 color plates; Harvard history and landscape professor John Stilgoe obliquely considers the idea of discovery, while New Yorker writer Adam Gopnik offers a brief history of the elevated railway, with comments by Sternfeld.

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