Hallucinogenic Plants Of North America

Jonathan Ott is one of the leading names in psychedelic (or ‘entheogenic’, the term he prefers) research today, and has published a string of books that mix deep knowledge of chemistry and ethnobotany with more free-form contents, such as poetry. This volume from 1976 was his first published work, facilitated with support from heavy names like Gordon Wasson and Richard Evans-Schultes; a support necessary not least because Ott was an auto-didact and didn’t have the formal academic credentials of most hallucinogen researchers. “Hallucinogenic Plants Of North America” is a slender volume that documents in the form of a traditional flora a variety of plants found on the North American continent. Cacti, various mushrooms, and a few plants such as Datura are presented with technical names and descriptions, and short histories of usage (the latter somewhat anecdotal and much too brief). Today the volume of known hallucinogens in the region is much larger than Ott’s scope, which does not include the DMT-containing prairie grass, as an example. In addition, many entheogenic plants have been introduced into the USA in recent decades, for the express purpose of psychedelic use. Thus, this book is only moderately useful today, and Ott’s own later works are more relevant. The section of 28 color photos of plants (mostly mushrooms) is nice to look at, though.

Text: Off Jonathan. cm 16,5×24; pp. 162; paperback. Publisher: Wingbow Press, Berkeley, 1976.

ID: 14984

Product Description

Jonathan Ott is one of the leading names in psychedelic (or ‘entheogenic’, the term he prefers) research today, and has published a string of books that mix deep knowledge of chemistry and ethnobotany with more free-form contents, such as poetry. This volume from 1976 was his first published work, facilitated with support from heavy names like Gordon Wasson and Richard Evans-Schultes; a support necessary not least because Ott was an auto-didact and didn’t have the formal academic credentials of most hallucinogen researchers. “Hallucinogenic Plants Of North America” is a slender volume that documents in the form of a traditional flora a variety of plants found on the North American continent. Cacti, various mushrooms, and a few plants such as Datura are presented with technical names and descriptions, and short histories of usage (the latter somewhat anecdotal and much too brief). Today the volume of known hallucinogens in the region is much larger than Ott’s scope, which does not include the DMT-containing prairie grass, as an example. In addition, many entheogenic plants have been introduced into the USA in recent decades, for the express purpose of psychedelic use. Thus, this book is only moderately useful today, and Ott’s own later works are more relevant. The section of 28 color photos of plants (mostly mushrooms) is nice to look at, though.

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