Dan Graham. Pavilion Drawings

This title has been published on the occasion of Dan Graham’s Pavilions exhibition at Lisson Gallery (21 March – 28 April 2012). One of the world’s most influential conceptual artists, Graham has been investigating the relationship between architectural environments and those who inhabit them since the late 1960s. His very personal and intuitive exploration of architectural space and perception has come to be defined by his pavilions. Blurring the line between art and architecture, Graham’s pavilions comprise steel, mirror and glass structures that create diverse optical effects. Created as hybrids, they operate as quasi-functional spaces and art installations. Studies of space and light, they are situated in public spaces and are activated by the presence of the viewer. Rigorously conceptual, uniquely beautiful and avowedly public, the pavilions exhibit a deliberate disorientation and playfulness that Graham encourages. After looking at office buildings in the 1980s he began using the same two-way mirror glass used in their construction to create the pavilions. A material that is both transparent and reflective it enabled Graham to deconstruct the surveillance aspect of the material, creating light-hearted situations out of potentially sinister ones; using humour to subvert corporate culture. The catalogue includes an essay by writer and critic Brian Hatton, and is a candid document of Dan Graham’s drawings and sketches of his not yet realised pavilions.

Text: Hatton Brian, Feaver Dorothy. cm 17×21; pp. 94; 52 COL e 25 BW ills.; paperback. Publisher: Lisson Gallery, London, 2012.

ISBN: 9780947830373| 0947830375

ID: 15050

Product Description

This title has been published on the occasion of Dan Graham’s Pavilions exhibition at Lisson Gallery (21 March – 28 April 2012). One of the world’s most influential conceptual artists, Graham has been investigating the relationship between architectural environments and those who inhabit them since the late 1960s. His very personal and intuitive exploration of architectural space and perception has come to be defined by his pavilions. Blurring the line between art and architecture, Graham’s pavilions comprise steel, mirror and glass structures that create diverse optical effects. Created as hybrids, they operate as quasi-functional spaces and art installations. Studies of space and light, they are situated in public spaces and are activated by the presence of the viewer. Rigorously conceptual, uniquely beautiful and avowedly public, the pavilions exhibit a deliberate disorientation and playfulness that Graham encourages. After looking at office buildings in the 1980s he began using the same two-way mirror glass used in their construction to create the pavilions. A material that is both transparent and reflective it enabled Graham to deconstruct the surveillance aspect of the material, creating light-hearted situations out of potentially sinister ones; using humour to subvert corporate culture. The catalogue includes an essay by writer and critic Brian Hatton, and is a candid document of Dan Graham’s drawings and sketches of his not yet realised pavilions.

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