Kenneth Josephson

For over 50 years, Josephson has been using photography to explore ideas about how we view reality. Formally trained under Aaron Siskind and Harry Callahan, Josephson taught at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago from 1960 to 1997. During his career, he has produced an impressive array of work, ranging from stunning black-and-white prints to striking assemblages to humorous Polaroids and has been exhibited widely in America and internationally. This book serves as a retrospective of his many experiments and inquiries into the nature of photography, including several extensive series and other pieces being published for the first time. The photographs are framed by informative essays by curator Wolf and critic and author Andy Grundberg and a chronology and interview by Stephanie Lipscomb, a research assistant at the Art Institute. The result is not only an exciting explication of Josephson’s endless curiosity but also an important discussion of photography as a modern, flexible, and fully expressive artistic medium.

Text: Wolf Sylvia, Lipscomb Stephanie. pp. 186; 17 COL e 157 bicromie; paperback. Publisher: Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, 1999.

ISBN: 9780865591783| 0865591784

ID: 16062

Product Description

For over 50 years, Josephson has been using photography to explore ideas about how we view reality. Formally trained under Aaron Siskind and Harry Callahan, Josephson taught at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago from 1960 to 1997. During his career, he has produced an impressive array of work, ranging from stunning black-and-white prints to striking assemblages to humorous Polaroids and has been exhibited widely in America and internationally. This book serves as a retrospective of his many experiments and inquiries into the nature of photography, including several extensive series and other pieces being published for the first time. The photographs are framed by informative essays by curator Wolf and critic and author Andy Grundberg and a chronology and interview by Stephanie Lipscomb, a research assistant at the Art Institute. The result is not only an exciting explication of Josephson’s endless curiosity but also an important discussion of photography as a modern, flexible, and fully expressive artistic medium.

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