The freedom to us – memoirs of Zengakuren student / Jiyu O warera ni

A collection of works by Junkenren’s notes and photographs, published by Nobel Shobo in 1968, “Journey to Liberty-Jitsuyu Owarera ni”. Nobel Shobo publishes good books, from books dealing with such politics and struggle, to photo books (such as Kenji Ishiguro). This book gathers the voices of students who participated in the Zengakuren (All-Japan Student Association), which was the center of the student movement in the 1960s. The photographs at the beginning of the book, including the cover, are by Kazuo Kitai, the first documentary photographer in Japan to be the winner of the 1st Kimura Ihei Photo Award. The illustrations are about 14, but there are Kitai’s immersive cuts, which are a skill of shooting the scene of “Struggle”, and a glimpse of the students’ real faces that may be between the struggles. Most of them are text books, but in a time when the opposition was loudly shouted, the voices of the students who were struggling, angry and confused, searching for what they needed to do, conveyed the urgent situation and excitement. It echoes with a faint poetry inside. (From The Japanese Photobook 1912–1990)

pp. 254; BW ills.; paperback. Publisher: Nobel Shobo, Tokyo, 1968.

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ID: 22786

Product Description

A collection of works by Junkenren’s notes and photographs, published by Nobel Shobo in 1968, “Journey to Liberty-Jitsuyu Owarera ni”. Nobel Shobo publishes good books, from books dealing with such politics and struggle, to photo books (such as Kenji Ishiguro). This book gathers the voices of students who participated in the Zengakuren (All-Japan Student Association), which was the center of the student movement in the 1960s. The photographs at the beginning of the book, including the cover, are by Kazuo Kitai, the first documentary photographer in Japan to be the winner of the 1st Kimura Ihei Photo Award. The illustrations are about 14, but there are Kitai’s immersive cuts, which are a skill of shooting the scene of “Struggle”, and a glimpse of the students’ real faces that may be between the struggles. Most of them are text books, but in a time when the opposition was loudly shouted, the voices of the students who were struggling, angry and confused, searching for what they needed to do, conveyed the urgent situation and excitement. It echoes with a faint poetry inside. (From The Japanese Photobook 1912–1990)

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