Willem de Kooning. Drawing Seeing / Seeing Drawing

As a collection of four groups of seldom-seen sketches by Willem de Kooning, this book succeeds in showing another side of the artist most often recognized for his abstract expressionism in the 1940s. Created more recently during a period ranging from the late 1950s to the early 1980s, the collection predominantly exhibits his dexterity with raw charcoal and ink, though the last group highlights his subtle color techniques. In a hardbound binding, the collected works are preserved on pages with superior quality and unified design. An informative introductory essay provides deeper insight into the artist and his work. Perhaps the strongest group includes the rudimentary sketches of a nude in “Drawings with Eyes Closed” as well as the harrowing and compelling images in the “Crucifixion Drawings.” In a style typical of abstract expressionism, these later pieces continue to show that de Kooning was interested in capturing the fluid energy and gestures of changing forms, without any intent to stabilize or focus. And since de Kooning was unwilling to state that any of his works were finished, we are left to contemplate the transformational essence of the creations by this artist fluent in reinvention.

Text: Philbin Ann. cm 24×29; pp. 130; COL and BW; hardcover. Publisher: Arena Editions, Santa Fe, 1998.

ISBN: 9780965728089| 0965728080

ID: AM-3486

Product Description

As a collection of four groups of seldom-seen sketches by Willem de Kooning, this book succeeds in showing another side of the artist most often recognized for his abstract expressionism in the 1940s. Created more recently during a period ranging from the late 1950s to the early 1980s, the collection predominantly exhibits his dexterity with raw charcoal and ink, though the last group highlights his subtle color techniques. In a hardbound binding, the collected works are preserved on pages with superior quality and unified design. An informative introductory essay provides deeper insight into the artist and his work. Perhaps the strongest group includes the rudimentary sketches of a nude in “Drawings with Eyes Closed” as well as the harrowing and compelling images in the “Crucifixion Drawings.” In a style typical of abstract expressionism, these later pieces continue to show that de Kooning was interested in capturing the fluid energy and gestures of changing forms, without any intent to stabilize or focus. And since de Kooning was unwilling to state that any of his works were finished, we are left to contemplate the transformational essence of the creations by this artist fluent in reinvention.

×