Melinda Hunt / Joel Sternfeld. Hart Island

This is the story of Hart Island, the Bronx, in the Long Island Sound, commonly referred to as “Potter’s Field”. Well-known New York-based photographer, Joel Sternfeld has created a series of colour photographs, which are complemented by installations of artist Melinda Hunt. The book represents a discovery, a documentation of an unknown territory right in front of the doors of New York City. After the purchase of the island, approximately one mile long and one-eighth to one-third of a mile wide, by the City in 1868, Hart Island has served as a cemetery, a charity hospital for women, an insane asylum, and a jail. During World War II the Island was turned over to the Navy. Later it served for housing of male derelicts, as a NIKE missile base for the US Army, for a narcotic rehabiliation programme, and finally as a cemetery again. Today, the inmate work details are bussed from Rikers Island to perform the burials, disinterments and maintenance of the Island. Since 1869, more than 750,000 burials have been performed. Hart Island is not open to the public.

cm 28×24; pp. 120; 56 COL e 1 ill. BW ills.; hardcover with dust jacket. Publisher: Scalo, Zürich, 1998.

ISBN: 9783931141905| 393114190X

ID: AM-4656

Product Description

This is the story of Hart Island, the Bronx, in the Long Island Sound, commonly referred to as “Potter’s Field”. Well-known New York-based photographer, Joel Sternfeld has created a series of colour photographs, which are complemented by installations of artist Melinda Hunt. The book represents a discovery, a documentation of an unknown territory right in front of the doors of New York City. After the purchase of the island, approximately one mile long and one-eighth to one-third of a mile wide, by the City in 1868, Hart Island has served as a cemetery, a charity hospital for women, an insane asylum, and a jail. During World War II the Island was turned over to the Navy. Later it served for housing of male derelicts, as a NIKE missile base for the US Army, for a narcotic rehabiliation programme, and finally as a cemetery again. Today, the inmate work details are bussed from Rikers Island to perform the burials, disinterments and maintenance of the Island. Since 1869, more than 750,000 burials have been performed. Hart Island is not open to the public.

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