Cities on the move 4: den asiatiske storby i 90erne

The major 1999 introductory show at Louisiana will be the exhibition Cities on the Move 4. The Asian City of the 90s. This exhibition series is the first presentation in Europe of the art and architecture of a number of Asian cities. Presenting the works of a hundred different artists and architects, the exhibition will shed light on the incredible dynamism and creativity of the life and culture of these cities today. The economic, cultural and political life in Asia is undergoing rapid change. In addition to already established economic powers such as Tokyo, Hong Kong, Singapore, Seoul and Kuala Lumpur, new economic centres are constantly emerging. The processes of urbanization and expansion lead to a growing exchange of architectural and urban planning ideas and practices between Asian and foreign professionals. This exchange, or confrontation, has generated some very innovative but also controversial models of architectural and urban conception and practice, reflecting conditions particular to Asia. In these areas, an art of new motivation, vitality and power has developed -its influence apparent in painting, architecture and film. The exhibition Cities on the Move 4. The Asian City of the 90s illuminates this impact. A number of Asian artists will be visiting The Louisiana Museum to set up existing works as well as new installations created specifically for this museum. The exhibition is organized by curators Hans-Ulrich Obrist and Hou Hanru. After first being shown at Wiener Secession and CAPC Musee d’art moderne, Bordeaux, it will open at the Louisiana Museum on 29 January 1999, and run until the 21 April 1999. Afterwards the exhibition will travel to the Hayward Gallery, London, and Kiasma, Helsingfors, ending up in Bangkok. A special AVversion of the exhibition is presently on show at PS1, New York. The idea is that the exhibition will change with each new showing to include new works and different concurrent events. The Louisiana Museum will therefore be collaborating with various other institutions, primarily based in Copenhagen, in connection with the arrangement of film, music and symposium events.

Text: Hanru Hou, Obrist Hans Ulrich. pp. 120; paperback. Publisher: Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek, 1999.

ISBN: 9788790029364| 8790029364

 90,00

ID: 13534

Product Description

The major 1999 introductory show at Louisiana will be the exhibition Cities on the Move 4. The Asian City of the 90s. This exhibition series is the first presentation in Europe of the art and architecture of a number of Asian cities. Presenting the works of a hundred different artists and architects, the exhibition will shed light on the incredible dynamism and creativity of the life and culture of these cities today. The economic, cultural and political life in Asia is undergoing rapid change. In addition to already established economic powers such as Tokyo, Hong Kong, Singapore, Seoul and Kuala Lumpur, new economic centres are constantly emerging. The processes of urbanization and expansion lead to a growing exchange of architectural and urban planning ideas and practices between Asian and foreign professionals. This exchange, or confrontation, has generated some very innovative but also controversial models of architectural and urban conception and practice, reflecting conditions particular to Asia. In these areas, an art of new motivation, vitality and power has developed -its influence apparent in painting, architecture and film. The exhibition Cities on the Move 4. The Asian City of the 90s illuminates this impact. A number of Asian artists will be visiting The Louisiana Museum to set up existing works as well as new installations created specifically for this museum. The exhibition is organized by curators Hans-Ulrich Obrist and Hou Hanru. After first being shown at Wiener Secession and CAPC Musee d’art moderne, Bordeaux, it will open at the Louisiana Museum on 29 January 1999, and run until the 21 April 1999. Afterwards the exhibition will travel to the Hayward Gallery, London, and Kiasma, Helsingfors, ending up in Bangkok. A special AVversion of the exhibition is presently on show at PS1, New York. The idea is that the exhibition will change with each new showing to include new works and different concurrent events. The Louisiana Museum will therefore be collaborating with various other institutions, primarily based in Copenhagen, in connection with the arrangement of film, music and symposium events.