19153

Earthworm II: Community Directory

This is a community directory for an underground network of groups, spaces, publications, and stores for a Central Illinois community of radicals, mainly centered in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois. Publications like this one, self-published and distributed through underground networks, were an important component of spreading information and organizing. Guides like this show how movements happen and spread. The earthworm II: community directory details what its producers call the Free Prairie Community (FPC), which for the amount of distance the groups cover is surprisingly diverse. The groups, which all fall loosely under the FPC umbrella, listed in the guide purport to cover issues from gay liberation, independent media, both press and video, art and food co-operatives, drug recovery, alternative learning sites, daycare, and environmental issues, among other things. The authors of Earthworm II: Community Directory had a space in Champaign-Urbana, in the early 1970s. They published this book to show that the various groups and spaces in their small community were actually working towards greater social change. They articulated five points about what the FPC entailed or could become: “[N]o one can be in it for the money” or making money must support the community and not be for individual gain. Collective decision-making was prioritized. The FPC instituted a community tax and everyone in the directory was required to pay the tax, or barring that to exchange a service. If you are not in it for “the right reasons,” even if your group meets the first three points, then you are not considered a part of the Free Prairie Community. At the time of publication, they were beginning to articulate a self-imposed tax of 1-4% for each group that was a part of the FCP that would go into a community fund. Participation would both provide funding for their alternative society and also demonstrate who was truly invested in this idea. This community of young, mostly white people, trying to build an alternative to the dominant culture didn’t last long, but remnants can still be seen around Champaign-Urbana today. We currently live in Urbana, so this book has added significance to us. What also makes it interesting to us is its earnest and awkward working through of ideas and notions of community in such a public way.

pp. 52; staple binding. Publisher: The Free Prairie Community, 1973.

ID: 19153

Product Description

This is a community directory for an underground network of groups, spaces, publications, and stores for a Central Illinois community of radicals, mainly centered in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois. Publications like this one, self-published and distributed through underground networks, were an important component of spreading information and organizing. Guides like this show how movements happen and spread. The earthworm II: community directory details what its producers call the Free Prairie Community (FPC), which for the amount of distance the groups cover is surprisingly diverse. The groups, which all fall loosely under the FPC umbrella, listed in the guide purport to cover issues from gay liberation, independent media, both press and video, art and food co-operatives, drug recovery, alternative learning sites, daycare, and environmental issues, among other things. The authors of Earthworm II: Community Directory had a space in Champaign-Urbana, in the early 1970s. They published this book to show that the various groups and spaces in their small community were actually working towards greater social change. They articulated five points about what the FPC entailed or could become: “[N]o one can be in it for the money” or making money must support the community and not be for individual gain. Collective decision-making was prioritized. The FPC instituted a community tax and everyone in the directory was required to pay the tax, or barring that to exchange a service. If you are not in it for “the right reasons,” even if your group meets the first three points, then you are not considered a part of the Free Prairie Community. At the time of publication, they were beginning to articulate a self-imposed tax of 1-4% for each group that was a part of the FCP that would go into a community fund. Participation would both provide funding for their alternative society and also demonstrate who was truly invested in this idea. This community of young, mostly white people, trying to build an alternative to the dominant culture didn’t last long, but remnants can still be seen around Champaign-Urbana today. We currently live in Urbana, so this book has added significance to us. What also makes it interesting to us is its earnest and awkward working through of ideas and notions of community in such a public way.