Exhibition as Social Intervention: ‘Culture in Action’ 1993

With an introduction by Tom Eccles and Paul O’Neill, essays by Joshua Decter and Helmut Draxler. Documentation of the contributing projects and reviews from the time, for instance by Joe Scanlan. Interviews with Mark Dion, Simon Grennan and Mary Jane Jacob. A show challenging conventional understandings of public art, ‘Culture in Action’ in Chicago had a new social agenda, and rethought what an exhibition of contemporary art might be. Through eight projects by artists initiated in the early 1990s and developed in collaboration with local people, the intention was to engage diverse groups over time, in addition to the visiting public in 1993. In the fifth book in Afterall’s Exhibition Histories series, the course of these projects is illustrated and described, with critical reappraisal of this important exhibition in newly commissioned essays and interviews. In the core text, Joshua Decter reflects on how we might evaluate this controversial curatorial project now. A review from The New York Times gives an example of the contemporaneous reception, and a new essay by Helmut Draxler elaborates on the expanded context for art-making and display in those years, bringing European perspectives to bear. The introduction by Tom Eccles and Paul O’Neill frames the whole, which further includes interviews with the curator and two of the participating artists.

Text: Eccels Tom, Decter Joshua et al. pp. 192; paperback. Publisher: Buchhandlung Walther König, Köln, 2013.

ISBN: 9783863354480| 3863354486

ID: 17313

Product Description

With an introduction by Tom Eccles and Paul O’Neill, essays by Joshua Decter and Helmut Draxler. Documentation of the contributing projects and reviews from the time, for instance by Joe Scanlan. Interviews with Mark Dion, Simon Grennan and Mary Jane Jacob. A show challenging conventional understandings of public art, ‘Culture in Action’ in Chicago had a new social agenda, and rethought what an exhibition of contemporary art might be. Through eight projects by artists initiated in the early 1990s and developed in collaboration with local people, the intention was to engage diverse groups over time, in addition to the visiting public in 1993. In the fifth book in Afterall’s Exhibition Histories series, the course of these projects is illustrated and described, with critical reappraisal of this important exhibition in newly commissioned essays and interviews. In the core text, Joshua Decter reflects on how we might evaluate this controversial curatorial project now. A review from The New York Times gives an example of the contemporaneous reception, and a new essay by Helmut Draxler elaborates on the expanded context for art-making and display in those years, bringing European perspectives to bear. The introduction by Tom Eccles and Paul O’Neill frames the whole, which further includes interviews with the curator and two of the participating artists.