Francesco Lo Savio

Francesco Lo Savio died aged only twenty-eight in 1963. Because of this, and perhaps because his work is seen mostly in bad reproduction where it might seem dry and disengaged, he is little known outside his native Italy. Lo Savio worked on blueprint, and on canvas, and on sheet metal, but always he pared down the materiality of the work. Each surface hovers, and appears to meld into the surrounding space. Canvas and steel are translated into direct experience of space and light. In structure the work anticipates American Minimalism but in its effect – apprehension is apprehended – it prefigures the achievements of conceptual art. The book reproduces for the first time as fairly as possible to its effects, a large body of Lo Savio’s work. It contains specially commissioned essays by Udo Kultermann, Achille Bonito Oliva, Stella Santacatterina and Jon Thompson, as well as writing by Lo Savio and by his friend and philosopher Emilio Villa.

Text: Kulterman Udo, Thompson Jon. cm 27×22; pp. 96; 24 COL; hardcover. Publisher: Peer, London, 2001.

ISBN: 9780953977215| 0953977218

ID: AM-6950

Product Description

Francesco Lo Savio died aged only twenty-eight in 1963. Because of this, and perhaps because his work is seen mostly in bad reproduction where it might seem dry and disengaged, he is little known outside his native Italy. Lo Savio worked on blueprint, and on canvas, and on sheet metal, but always he pared down the materiality of the work. Each surface hovers, and appears to meld into the surrounding space. Canvas and steel are translated into direct experience of space and light. In structure the work anticipates American Minimalism but in its effect – apprehension is apprehended – it prefigures the achievements of conceptual art. The book reproduces for the first time as fairly as possible to its effects, a large body of Lo Savio’s work. It contains specially commissioned essays by Udo Kultermann, Achille Bonito Oliva, Stella Santacatterina and Jon Thompson, as well as writing by Lo Savio and by his friend and philosopher Emilio Villa.