Greetings from L.A.: A Novel

Beginning in the 1960s select Los Angeles artists began to mimic the look and feel of commercial marketing strategies by treating viewers as consumers. In this vein, Allen Ruppersberg produced a series of books that demonstrate an interest in the products of popular culture. One of these was Greetings from L.A., the subtitle for which declares it to be a novel. A flip of its pages reveals only occasional bits of narrative, with the most of the pages left blank. The back cover, meanwhile, features a parody of the exaggerated and breathy prose used to sell airport fiction and cheap thrillers. The piece is striking for this contrast between its content, a high-culture exploration of text and spacing that nods to the French poet Stéphane Mallarmé, and its seeming appearance as low-culture pulp fiction.

pp. 250; paperback. Publisher: Self Published, Los Angeles, 1972.

ID: 16622

Product Description

Beginning in the 1960s select Los Angeles artists began to mimic the look and feel of commercial marketing strategies by treating viewers as consumers. In this vein, Allen Ruppersberg produced a series of books that demonstrate an interest in the products of popular culture. One of these was Greetings from L.A., the subtitle for which declares it to be a novel. A flip of its pages reveals only occasional bits of narrative, with the most of the pages left blank. The back cover, meanwhile, features a parody of the exaggerated and breathy prose used to sell airport fiction and cheap thrillers. The piece is striking for this contrast between its content, a high-culture exploration of text and spacing that nods to the French poet Stéphane Mallarmé, and its seeming appearance as low-culture pulp fiction.

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