Hannah Wilke

The first monograph on an artist whose provocative and ultimately deeply moving work played an essential part in women’s transformation of the art world. Hannah Wilke’s artwork, like her life, frames a heroic story about formal invention and social activism, personal loyalties and individual freedom, and, above all, breathtaking risk. A defining presence in the emerging community of women artists in the 1960s and 70s, Wilke developed a unique and controversial visual language in response to her own and women s experience. An unapologetic individualist, she celebrated her relationships with men as well as women and frankly explored the pleasures of sexuality. Using a wide range of nontraditional mediums, including latex and chewing gum as well as photography and film, she irreverently paid tribute to predecessors from Marcel Duchamp to David Smith. Focusing on the body as instrument and object of visual expression, Wilke made her art an unremitting self-exploration without false modesty (when her naked body was an uncomplicated delight to behold) or shame (when it was mercilessly blighted by cancer). Wilke’s art is inseparable from Wilke the person bold, sometimes outrageous, and, ultimately, heartbreakingly courageous.

Text: Princenthal Nancy. pp. 168; hardcover. Publisher: Prestel Verlag, Münich, 2010.

ISBN: 9783791339726| 3791339729

ID: 15926

Product Description

The first monograph on an artist whose provocative and ultimately deeply moving work played an essential part in women’s transformation of the art world. Hannah Wilke’s artwork, like her life, frames a heroic story about formal invention and social activism, personal loyalties and individual freedom, and, above all, breathtaking risk. A defining presence in the emerging community of women artists in the 1960s and 70s, Wilke developed a unique and controversial visual language in response to her own and women s experience. An unapologetic individualist, she celebrated her relationships with men as well as women and frankly explored the pleasures of sexuality. Using a wide range of nontraditional mediums, including latex and chewing gum as well as photography and film, she irreverently paid tribute to predecessors from Marcel Duchamp to David Smith. Focusing on the body as instrument and object of visual expression, Wilke made her art an unremitting self-exploration without false modesty (when her naked body was an uncomplicated delight to behold) or shame (when it was mercilessly blighted by cancer). Wilke’s art is inseparable from Wilke the person bold, sometimes outrageous, and, ultimately, heartbreakingly courageous.