17370

Living Arts #1

Living Arts magazine was edited by Theo Crosby and John Bodley. Designed by Gordon House. Published by The Institute of Contemporary Arts in association with Tillotsons (Boulton) Ltd. © 1963. “Living arts is a documentary magazine, planned to complement the activities of The Institute of Contemporary Arts, and to develop its own audience for original work and the examination of ideas. It will cover all the arts, especially the visual arts and architecture, and will also aim to publish creative work in the fields of literature, music, philosophy and science. The need for a full-scale English art review has been obvious for many years, and in founding Living arts the editors are conscious of what might be done in ideal circumstances, with the time, thought, energy and capital. However, we have chosen as our immediate object the documenting of some of the vital activity of our own time. The ‘fifties have passed, and we remember the ferment of intellectual exchange and experiment that took place in and around the ICA; yet how little except fugitive pieces survives to fix the activity of those years in print; a generation engrossed in the processes of communication will be found in retrospect to have committed only a fraction of its aims, arguments, basic ideas and sources to the record. The effort to start Living arts will have been justified if something of the live art, the raw thinking and the studio talk of the following period, however tangential, survives in its pages.”

Text: Crosby Theo, Freeman Robert et al. cm 21×21; pp. 108; COL and BW; paperback. Publisher: Institute of Contemporary Art, London, 1963.

 350,00

Product Description

Living Arts magazine was edited by Theo Crosby and John Bodley. Designed by Gordon House. Published by The Institute of Contemporary Arts in association with Tillotsons (Boulton) Ltd. © 1963. “Living arts is a documentary magazine, planned to complement the activities of The Institute of Contemporary Arts, and to develop its own audience for original work and the examination of ideas. It will cover all the arts, especially the visual arts and architecture, and will also aim to publish creative work in the fields of literature, music, philosophy and science. The need for a full-scale English art review has been obvious for many years, and in founding Living arts the editors are conscious of what might be done in ideal circumstances, with the time, thought, energy and capital. However, we have chosen as our immediate object the documenting of some of the vital activity of our own time. The ‘fifties have passed, and we remember the ferment of intellectual exchange and experiment that took place in and around the ICA; yet how little except fugitive pieces survives to fix the activity of those years in print; a generation engrossed in the processes of communication will be found in retrospect to have committed only a fraction of its aims, arguments, basic ideas and sources to the record. The effort to start Living arts will have been justified if something of the live art, the raw thinking and the studio talk of the following period, however tangential, survives in its pages.”