Mapping the Terrain. New Genre public Art

Edited by Suzanne Lacy, a Bay Area artist and theorist, the collection is the first to attempt such a comprehensive look at the field. Indeed, the sheer scope of consideration is breathtaking at times, and the contributors convincingly provide a collective framework for art events as various as billboard art and fifties Happenings, mural projects and parks implemented by urban planners, site-specific sculptures, and ritual dances. Artists as varied as Judy Chicago, Christo, Ant Farm, the Guerrilla Girls and Mujeres Muralistas are considered. The book breaks ground, however, in its effort to provoke, disturb and disrupt the reader’s sense of where, exactly, the boundaries between life and art are drawn. Whereas much public art criticism is descriptive, the contributors to this volume concentrate on articulating “where we are and where we’re going” (Lucy R. Lippard), and all participated in the creation of the compendium which lists individual artists and describes specific works. The attempt is less to map out, survey or contain than it is to devise critical strategies and theoretical and practical approaches to this dramatically expanding field — Artweek, April, 1995

In original essays, well-known critics and artists (among them Lucy Lippard, Arlene Raven, Suzi Gablik, and Guillermo Gomez-Pena) explore what happens when artists directly engage and address “real-world” audiences in various public sites and use public art as an instrument of public change. Included is a valuable illustrated compendium of ninety pioneering artists who, for nearly twenty years, have been perfecting an artistic aesthetic based not on similarities of medium but on shared methods, purpose, and intent. — Midwest Book Review

Mapping the Terrain: New Genre Public Art, edited by Lacy, fuels the emerging critical discourse in public art and begins to define a new style of art production. The text includes 12 essays by important artists, curators and critics, as well as a compendium of the work of over 90 artists. Many of the essays included in this text speak out strongly against Modernist claims of authorship and individuality. Historical notions of a passive audience viewing large-scale sculpture in plazas, what Lucy Lippard refers to as “plunk art,” are challenged by new genre public art. By interacting with the audience in participatory events that intend to build community, many have questioned whether the result is actually art or social work…..Mapping the Terrain seeks to firmly place this type of activity in an art context and calls for a re-evaluation of existing definitions of art. Particularly noteworthy in this regard are the essays by Suzi Gablik, Patricia Phillips, Lippard and Jeff Kelley

Text: Lacy Suzanne. cm 20,5×15,5; pp. 296; COL and BW; paperback. Publisher: Bay Press, San Francisco, 1994.

ISBN: 9780941920308| 0941920305
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Edited by Suzanne Lacy, a Bay Area artist and theorist, the collection is the first to attempt such a comprehensive look at the field. Indeed, the sheer scope of consideration is breathtaking at times, and the contributors convincingly provide a collective framework for art events as various as billboard art and fifties Happenings, mural projects and parks implemented by urban planners, site-specific sculptures, and ritual dances. Artists as varied as Judy Chicago, Christo, Ant Farm, the Guerrilla Girls and Mujeres Muralistas are considered. The book breaks ground, however, in its effort to provoke, disturb and disrupt the reader’s sense of where, exactly, the boundaries between life and art are drawn. Whereas much public art criticism is descriptive, the contributors to this volume concentrate on articulating “where we are and where we’re going” (Lucy R. Lippard), and all participated in the creation of the compendium which lists individual artists and describes specific works. The attempt is less to map out, survey or contain than it is to devise critical strategies and theoretical and practical approaches to this dramatically expanding field — Artweek, April, 1995

In original essays, well-known critics and artists (among them Lucy Lippard, Arlene Raven, Suzi Gablik, and Guillermo Gomez-Pena) explore what happens when artists directly engage and address “real-world” audiences in various public sites and use public art as an instrument of public change. Included is a valuable illustrated compendium of ninety pioneering artists who, for nearly twenty years, have been perfecting an artistic aesthetic based not on similarities of medium but on shared methods, purpose, and intent. — Midwest Book Review

Mapping the Terrain: New Genre Public Art, edited by Lacy, fuels the emerging critical discourse in public art and begins to define a new style of art production. The text includes 12 essays by important artists, curators and critics, as well as a compendium of the work of over 90 artists. Many of the essays included in this text speak out strongly against Modernist claims of authorship and individuality. Historical notions of a passive audience viewing large-scale sculpture in plazas, what Lucy Lippard refers to as “plunk art,” are challenged by new genre public art. By interacting with the audience in participatory events that intend to build community, many have questioned whether the result is actually art or social work…..Mapping the Terrain seeks to firmly place this type of activity in an art context and calls for a re-evaluation of existing definitions of art. Particularly noteworthy in this regard are the essays by Suzi Gablik, Patricia Phillips, Lippard and Jeff Kelley