Noise, Water, Meat: A History of Sound in the Arts

The role of sound in the spectrum of artistic disciplines is one of unique and boundless dimensions. In his new book, Kahn (media arts, Univ. of Technology, Sydney, Australia) examines the history, philosophies, politics, patterns, technology, sociology, and impact of sound in art. Emphasizing that “none of the arts is entirely mute,” he surveys the potential equality of aural and visual in the artistic hierarchy, the influence of aurality on various forms of art and cultural thought (and vice versa), the fluid boundaries between the concepts of noise and music, and Western vs. Eastern definitions of the voice. He covers everything from the poetry of Kerouac, the films of Bunuel, the compositions of John Cage, and the paintings of Jackson Pollock to dripping water and body sounds. Kahn’s research is impressive, and his presentation is thorough and precise.

Text: Kahn Douglas. cm 17,5×22,5; pp. 472; paperback. Publisher: M.I.T. Press, Cambridge, 2001.

ISBN: 9780262611725| 0262611724

ID: AM-7212

Product Description

The role of sound in the spectrum of artistic disciplines is one of unique and boundless dimensions. In his new book, Kahn (media arts, Univ. of Technology, Sydney, Australia) examines the history, philosophies, politics, patterns, technology, sociology, and impact of sound in art. Emphasizing that “none of the arts is entirely mute,” he surveys the potential equality of aural and visual in the artistic hierarchy, the influence of aurality on various forms of art and cultural thought (and vice versa), the fluid boundaries between the concepts of noise and music, and Western vs. Eastern definitions of the voice. He covers everything from the poetry of Kerouac, the films of Bunuel, the compositions of John Cage, and the paintings of Jackson Pollock to dripping water and body sounds. Kahn’s research is impressive, and his presentation is thorough and precise.