Domebook 2

A dome is just a portion of a sphere. Lloyd Kahn is at it again, with Domebook 2. Kahn’s seminal book Shelter was one of the original inspirations for our library project. He says about the Domebook, “t’s much easier to build, than it is to write about it.” True to this sentiment Domebook contains over 100 pages of beautiful images and illustrations with brief and clear instructions – both written and drawn – and conversations about inspirations for building shelter out of domes. Buckminster Fuller, the key thinker behind Kahn and others’ fascination with dome building, gave away his original design for what he called the Sun Dome in the May 1966 issue of Popular Science. The plans, after Fuller improved them, were later sold for $5 by the magazine. Fuller’s geodesic geometry was built with mathematics, wood scraps and staples; a model that Kahn took up with a passion, continuing the meme with Domebooks 1 & 2, building domes around California. Domebook 2 was written after many years of personal research with groups of people from the high school students and teachers at Pacific High School in California to the radical arts group Ant Farm, known for the inflatable structures (Inflatocookbook), to willing friends who wanted to experiment with their living situations. “Make models,” words of wisdom and encouragement from Kahn and friends. The group made multiple models before building their domes. The many domes that are included in the book were built in varied landscapes with materials from wood paneling, polyethylene, vinyl, Plexiglas, hot glue, bolts, and even red wood scraps and staples. The book notes that people have built shelters for thousands of years using the materials at hand inspired by “architecture of necessity.” Kahn laments that most likely too much money was spent on the creation of domes out of man-made materials, when a sufficient shelter could have been built from more local and inexpensive material. Despite the truth in this statement, the designs in this book built with a – blueprint of mathematics – are about a shift in consciousness around ideas of joy, authorship in architecture, and creative use of space.

Text: Kahn Lloyd. cm 27,5×36,5; BW ills.; staple binding. Publisher: Pacific Domes, Bolinas, 1971.

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ID: OP-0540

Product Description

A dome is just a portion of a sphere. Lloyd Kahn is at it again, with Domebook 2. Kahn’s seminal book Shelter was one of the original inspirations for our library project. He says about the Domebook, “t’s much easier to build, than it is to write about it.” True to this sentiment Domebook contains over 100 pages of beautiful images and illustrations with brief and clear instructions – both written and drawn – and conversations about inspirations for building shelter out of domes. Buckminster Fuller, the key thinker behind Kahn and others’ fascination with dome building, gave away his original design for what he called the Sun Dome in the May 1966 issue of Popular Science. The plans, after Fuller improved them, were later sold for $5 by the magazine. Fuller’s geodesic geometry was built with mathematics, wood scraps and staples; a model that Kahn took up with a passion, continuing the meme with Domebooks 1 & 2, building domes around California. Domebook 2 was written after many years of personal research with groups of people from the high school students and teachers at Pacific High School in California to the radical arts group Ant Farm, known for the inflatable structures (Inflatocookbook), to willing friends who wanted to experiment with their living situations. “Make models,” words of wisdom and encouragement from Kahn and friends. The group made multiple models before building their domes. The many domes that are included in the book were built in varied landscapes with materials from wood paneling, polyethylene, vinyl, Plexiglas, hot glue, bolts, and even red wood scraps and staples. The book notes that people have built shelters for thousands of years using the materials at hand inspired by “architecture of necessity.” Kahn laments that most likely too much money was spent on the creation of domes out of man-made materials, when a sufficient shelter could have been built from more local and inexpensive material. Despite the truth in this statement, the designs in this book built with a – blueprint of mathematics – are about a shift in consciousness around ideas of joy, authorship in architecture, and creative use of space.

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