Expanded Cinema

‘Today, when one speaks of cinema, one implies a metamorphosis in human perception,’ writes the author of this extraordinary book. ‘Just as the term ‘man’ is coming to mean man/plant/machine, so the definition of cinema must be expanded to unclude videotronics, computer science, and atomic light.’ In a brilliant and far-ranging study, Gene Youngblood traces the evolution of cinematic language to the end of fiction, drama, and realism. New technological extensions of the medium have become necessary. Thus he concentrates on the advanced image-making technologies of computer films, television experiments, laser movies, and multiple-projection environments. Outstanding works in each field are meticulously described, including interviews with artists and technologists. Expanded Cinema is filled with provocative post-McLuhan philosophical probes into ‘The Paleocybernetic Age,’ ‘the videosphere,’ and ‘the new nostalgia,’ all in the context of what the author calls ‘the global intermedia network.’ In ‘Image-Exchange and the Post-Mass Audience Age,’ Mr. Youngblood discusses the revolutionary implications of videotape cassettes and the cable television as educational tools. His observations are placed in comprehensive perspective by an inspiring introduction written by R. Buckminster Fuller. The text is richly illustrated by 284 photographs, including 60 in full colour. Vast in scope, both philosophical and technical, Expanded Cinema will be invaluable to all who are concerned with the audio-visual extensions of man, the technologies that are reshaping the nature of human communications.

Text: Youngblood Gene, Buckminster Fuller R.. cm 14,5×20; pp. 432; 60 COL e 224 BW ills.; hardcover with dust jacket. Publisher: Studio Vista, London, 1970.

ISBN: 9780289701133 | 0289701139

 80,00

ID: OP-1659

Product Description

‘Today, when one speaks of cinema, one implies a metamorphosis in human perception,’ writes the author of this extraordinary book. ‘Just as the term ‘man’ is coming to mean man/plant/machine, so the definition of cinema must be expanded to unclude videotronics, computer science, and atomic light.’ In a brilliant and far-ranging study, Gene Youngblood traces the evolution of cinematic language to the end of fiction, drama, and realism. New technological extensions of the medium have become necessary. Thus he concentrates on the advanced image-making technologies of computer films, television experiments, laser movies, and multiple-projection environments. Outstanding works in each field are meticulously described, including interviews with artists and technologists. Expanded Cinema is filled with provocative post-McLuhan philosophical probes into ‘The Paleocybernetic Age,’ ‘the videosphere,’ and ‘the new nostalgia,’ all in the context of what the author calls ‘the global intermedia network.’ In ‘Image-Exchange and the Post-Mass Audience Age,’ Mr. Youngblood discusses the revolutionary implications of videotape cassettes and the cable television as educational tools. His observations are placed in comprehensive perspective by an inspiring introduction written by R. Buckminster Fuller. The text is richly illustrated by 284 photographs, including 60 in full colour. Vast in scope, both philosophical and technical, Expanded Cinema will be invaluable to all who are concerned with the audio-visual extensions of man, the technologies that are reshaping the nature of human communications.

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