Paul Graham. End of an Age

“Portraits are one of the most profound things that one can do to express who we are through our material presence. To look at someone, to simply and truly see someone, and express their sentience. To reflect the inner self through external appearance.” A club in a city somewhere in Western Europe in the wee hours of the morning: young people dancing, talking, flirting, drinking. Paul Graham photographed them when they were alone sitting in a corner, on the border of a dance floor. He captured tranquil, composed portraits of young men and women on the cusp of adulthood pensively drifting away, caught in lonely sorrow, or exhaustedly resting amidst the hustle and the bustle of club life. “I guess what is important here to say is that this is absolutely not a documentary of the club world, the nightlife scene, or whatever. …The constituency of people I wanted to photograph are found there–people at that age when one has left childhood, but has not yet quite integrated fully into adulthood.” End of an Age is a meditation on the transition from adolescence to adulthood at the end of the postwar order. Ultra-sharp direct flash images alternate with blurred, available-light photographs, a long, inquiring, and elegiac look at young white adults facing an uncertain future after the end of white, Western mono-culture.

cm 25×33; pp. 100; COL; hardcover with dust jacket. Publisher: Scalo, Zürich, 1999.

ISBN: 9783908247173 | 3908247179

ID: AM-4591

Product Description

“Portraits are one of the most profound things that one can do to express who we are through our material presence. To look at someone, to simply and truly see someone, and express their sentience. To reflect the inner self through external appearance.” A club in a city somewhere in Western Europe in the wee hours of the morning: young people dancing, talking, flirting, drinking. Paul Graham photographed them when they were alone sitting in a corner, on the border of a dance floor. He captured tranquil, composed portraits of young men and women on the cusp of adulthood pensively drifting away, caught in lonely sorrow, or exhaustedly resting amidst the hustle and the bustle of club life. “I guess what is important here to say is that this is absolutely not a documentary of the club world, the nightlife scene, or whatever. …The constituency of people I wanted to photograph are found there–people at that age when one has left childhood, but has not yet quite integrated fully into adulthood.” End of an Age is a meditation on the transition from adolescence to adulthood at the end of the postwar order. Ultra-sharp direct flash images alternate with blurred, available-light photographs, a long, inquiring, and elegiac look at young white adults facing an uncertain future after the end of white, Western mono-culture.

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