Poppy – Trails of Afghan Heroin

Photographers Antoinette de Jong & Robert Knoth follow the trail of Afghan heroin – an exhibition at Fotomuseum Rotterdam Since the Taliban were removed from power in 2001, opium production has soared. Afghanistan now produces 93% of the world’s harvest. The number of deaths related to Afghan heroin is estimated at 100,000 people every year by the United Nations Office for Drugs and Crime (UNO DC). The annual trade in opiates amounts to €50 billion, with more than 15 million people using heroin worldwide. De Jong & Knoth decided to show the impact of the heroin production and travelled along its trail. The project’s starting point is Afghanistan’s disintegration in the early 1990s. From there, it follows an avalanche of turmoil and devastation along the Afghan heroin trail through Central Asia into Russia, the Balkans and Western Europe and finally into the United Kingdom. They show the relationship between ‘far-away’ places such as Kandahar, Bishkek and Tirana, and the day-to-day events in our own neighbourhoods, such as street crime, drug addiction and even terrorism. By connecting the dots, the ever more complex patterns of a globalised world are uncovered.

Text: Knoth Robert, de Jong Antoinette. cm 17×24; pp. 384; 180 COL; hardcover. Publisher: Hatje Cantz Verlag, Ostfildern, 2012.

ISBN: 9783775733373| 377573337X

ID: 14966

Product Description

Photographers Antoinette de Jong & Robert Knoth follow the trail of Afghan heroin – an exhibition at Fotomuseum Rotterdam Since the Taliban were removed from power in 2001, opium production has soared. Afghanistan now produces 93% of the world’s harvest. The number of deaths related to Afghan heroin is estimated at 100,000 people every year by the United Nations Office for Drugs and Crime (UNO DC). The annual trade in opiates amounts to €50 billion, with more than 15 million people using heroin worldwide. De Jong & Knoth decided to show the impact of the heroin production and travelled along its trail. The project’s starting point is Afghanistan’s disintegration in the early 1990s. From there, it follows an avalanche of turmoil and devastation along the Afghan heroin trail through Central Asia into Russia, the Balkans and Western Europe and finally into the United Kingdom. They show the relationship between ‘far-away’ places such as Kandahar, Bishkek and Tirana, and the day-to-day events in our own neighbourhoods, such as street crime, drug addiction and even terrorism. By connecting the dots, the ever more complex patterns of a globalised world are uncovered.

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