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Richard Serra. Animal habitats live and stuffed

“Time Magazzine, May 1966: Another realist of sorts also opened last week to grunts of approval in Rome’s Gallerie [sic] La Salita. He is Richard Serra, 27, whose credentials include a Master of Fine Arts degree from Yale and a Fulbright fellowship; he is currently deep in his zoo period. On exhibit were crude cages in which disport two turtles, two quail, a rabbit, a hen, two guinea pigs and a 97-lb sow. The big pig oinks away as part of a work called Live Pig Cage I. “I’m not saying the pig is art or is not art, says the artist, “but she makes a form.” Other goodies on view include a stuffed ocelot, a stuffed owl and a stuffed boar (serra’s wife is an amateur taxidermist), bidets crammed with conch shells beaten-up boxing gloves, and broom bristles. Of his crass menageries, Serra says, “People didn’t know whether Robert Rauschenberg’s goat with a tire around it was art. Now they know. If an artist goes on making goats, though, he’s hung up.” Serra tries to stay loose and designs his works to last. Says he proudly, “I take great care to glue every feather down.” First exhibition catalogue of Richard Serra, Galleria La Salita, Roma, 24 maggio 1966 “The work involves a placement of juxtaposed materials for the sake of the idea: the projected sexual metaphor. The concern is not with the merit of any particular esthetic object. The works are psychological and obsessive. Medium is mixed _ Animals are used as sex. Containers as sex. Experience as sex. My ambition is to present a daisy chain” “I dropped painting and started working with stuffed and live animals, including chickens, rabbits, and a live pig, zoological cage experiments, which led to my first one-man show in Rome at the Galleria La Salita. At that time, Arte Povera hadn’t really coalesced as a movement–I’m not saying I was responsible for it, but it was in the air. I think a year and a half later, Kounellis was showing live horses in a gallery, and the movement took off.”

cm 17×24; pp. 12; 5 BW ills.; staple binding. Publisher: Galleria la Salita, Roma, 1966.

 900,00

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ID: 23056

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“Time Magazzine, May 1966: Another realist of sorts also opened last week to grunts of approval in Rome’s Gallerie [sic] La Salita. He is Richard Serra, 27, whose credentials include a Master of Fine Arts degree from Yale and a Fulbright fellowship; he is currently deep in his zoo period. On exhibit were crude cages in which disport two turtles, two quail, a rabbit, a hen, two guinea pigs and a 97-lb sow. The big pig oinks away as part of a work called Live Pig Cage I. “I’m not saying the pig is art or is not art, says the artist, “but she makes a form.” Other goodies on view include a stuffed ocelot, a stuffed owl and a stuffed boar (serra’s wife is an amateur taxidermist), bidets crammed with conch shells beaten-up boxing gloves, and broom bristles. Of his crass menageries, Serra says, “People didn’t know whether Robert Rauschenberg’s goat with a tire around it was art. Now they know. If an artist goes on making goats, though, he’s hung up.” Serra tries to stay loose and designs his works to last. Says he proudly, “I take great care to glue every feather down.” First exhibition catalogue of Richard Serra, Galleria La Salita, Roma, 24 maggio 1966 “The work involves a placement of juxtaposed materials for the sake of the idea: the projected sexual metaphor. The concern is not with the merit of any particular esthetic object. The works are psychological and obsessive. Medium is mixed _ Animals are used as sex. Containers as sex. Experience as sex. My ambition is to present a daisy chain” “I dropped painting and started working with stuffed and live animals, including chickens, rabbits, and a live pig, zoological cage experiments, which led to my first one-man show in Rome at the Galleria La Salita. At that time, Arte Povera hadn’t really coalesced as a movement–I’m not saying I was responsible for it, but it was in the air. I think a year and a half later, Kounellis was showing live horses in a gallery, and the movement took off.”

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