12193

Riley and His Story. Me and my outrage. You and us.

Monica Haller’s project Riley and His Story presents the daily life of the Iraq war, as lived and photographed by Riley Sharbonno, an army nurse who served at Abu Ghraib prison from 2004-2005. Riley used his camera as an almost prosthetic device to record the events his memory suppressed; on other occasions he used the camera to “store” overwhelming experiences with the aim of processing them later. Many of these images are indeed overwhelming–“these aren’t the photos we’re likely to find in grandma’s photo album 50 years from now,” he rightly observes–and the photo pages in this book are variously sized, creating intersection and overlap to mimic the unstable nature of such memories and convey the blurry jumble of amnesia and trauma. Riley and His Story is an invitation to all, including war veterans, family and friends, to encounter the realities of warfare as related by one who was there. This is not a book. This is an invitation, a container for unstable images, a model for further action. Here is the formula : Riley and his story. Me and my outrage. You and us. Riley was a friend in college and later served as a nurse at Abu Ghraib prison. This is a container for Riley’s digital pictures and fleeting traumatic memories. Images he could not fully secure or expel and entrusted to me. Art can be a series of acts and challenges. Currently the artwork is an object in your hand—organized, mobile, tactile—a stable site to see information once elusive. The artist can mobilize information by provoking, listening, imagining, organizing and reorganizing. Right now, I am the artist. I want you to see what this war did to Riley. Pay attention. This experience happens right in your lap. To make it happen, you must read compassionately, then actively. Then the experience happens wherever you take this container and whenever you respond to my invitation. You and us, yes. Then you and another. This invitation is a model for veterans, families and friends to speak and share openly with each other. The artwork and artist are adaptable ; you, the tactical reader, can use this object for your own device, or you can attend to another archive in need of careful attention. This is not a book. It is an object of deployment. This book has won the Birgit Skiöld Award of excellence at the London Artists Book Fair 09.

Text: Sharbonno Riley. cm 16,5×23,5; pp. 480; COL; hardcover. Publisher: OneStar press, Paris / Falth & Hassler, 2009.

ISBN: 9782915359381| 2915359385
Request info
ID: 12193

Product Description

Monica Haller’s project Riley and His Story presents the daily life of the Iraq war, as lived and photographed by Riley Sharbonno, an army nurse who served at Abu Ghraib prison from 2004-2005. Riley used his camera as an almost prosthetic device to record the events his memory suppressed; on other occasions he used the camera to “store” overwhelming experiences with the aim of processing them later. Many of these images are indeed overwhelming–“these aren’t the photos we’re likely to find in grandma’s photo album 50 years from now,” he rightly observes–and the photo pages in this book are variously sized, creating intersection and overlap to mimic the unstable nature of such memories and convey the blurry jumble of amnesia and trauma. Riley and His Story is an invitation to all, including war veterans, family and friends, to encounter the realities of warfare as related by one who was there. This is not a book. This is an invitation, a container for unstable images, a model for further action. Here is the formula : Riley and his story. Me and my outrage. You and us. Riley was a friend in college and later served as a nurse at Abu Ghraib prison. This is a container for Riley’s digital pictures and fleeting traumatic memories. Images he could not fully secure or expel and entrusted to me. Art can be a series of acts and challenges. Currently the artwork is an object in your hand—organized, mobile, tactile—a stable site to see information once elusive. The artist can mobilize information by provoking, listening, imagining, organizing and reorganizing. Right now, I am the artist. I want you to see what this war did to Riley. Pay attention. This experience happens right in your lap. To make it happen, you must read compassionately, then actively. Then the experience happens wherever you take this container and whenever you respond to my invitation. You and us, yes. Then you and another. This invitation is a model for veterans, families and friends to speak and share openly with each other. The artwork and artist are adaptable ; you, the tactical reader, can use this object for your own device, or you can attend to another archive in need of careful attention. This is not a book. It is an object of deployment. This book has won the Birgit Skiöld Award of excellence at the London Artists Book Fair 09.