Samurai and Beautiful Women The Japanese Color Woodcut Masters Kuniyoshi and Kunisada

The first comprehensive, side-by-side comparison of works by woodcut masters Kunisada and Kuniyoshi In the early 1960s, what was then the Kunstmuseum Düsseldorf received a large gift of Japanese woodcuts (ukiyo-e), and the donor generously added to the collection until 1988. Among the works are 220 pieces by the illustrators Kunisada (1786–1865) and Kuniyoshi (1798–1861), which are distinguished by their finely tuned palettes and the expressive gestures of their figures. The prints take the observer into a colorful, imaginative dream world, while some even seem like early examples of the Manga comics so popular today. This publication offers a rare opportunity to compare the two artists’ illustrations of the same themes. The essays provide an introduction to nineteenth-century Japanese popular culture, bridging the gap between the centuries by exploring aspects of the grotesque in Japanese art, explaining legends and plays, and presenting some of Kuniyoshi’s preliminary studies.

Text: Luyken Gunda, von der Schulenburg Stephan et al. cm 24×30; pp. 304; 230 COL; hardcover. Publisher: Hatje Cantz Verlag, Ostfildern, 2011.

ISBN: 9783775732390| 377573239X

ID: 13585

Product Description

The first comprehensive, side-by-side comparison of works by woodcut masters Kunisada and Kuniyoshi In the early 1960s, what was then the Kunstmuseum Düsseldorf received a large gift of Japanese woodcuts (ukiyo-e), and the donor generously added to the collection until 1988. Among the works are 220 pieces by the illustrators Kunisada (1786–1865) and Kuniyoshi (1798–1861), which are distinguished by their finely tuned palettes and the expressive gestures of their figures. The prints take the observer into a colorful, imaginative dream world, while some even seem like early examples of the Manga comics so popular today. This publication offers a rare opportunity to compare the two artists’ illustrations of the same themes. The essays provide an introduction to nineteenth-century Japanese popular culture, bridging the gap between the centuries by exploring aspects of the grotesque in Japanese art, explaining legends and plays, and presenting some of Kuniyoshi’s preliminary studies.