Ueda Shoji

Comprising work produced throughout the span of Ueda’s professional life, from the 1930s through the 1990s, this book features photographs that were originally published in the now-defunct Camera Mainichi magazine between 1974 and 1985. From the Shoji Ueda Museum of Photography: “Shoji Ueda (1913-2000) is regarded as one of the most outstanding Japanese photographers of his time. Although he only left his native Tottori Prefecture on a few occasions, Ueda discovered the photographic innovations of the Western avant-garde through specialist publications that he received from time to time, and he felt drawn toward technical and aesthetic experimentation. Following a barren period during the Second World War, Ueda returned to his work and produced some of his most representative [imagery], in which the dunes of Tottori became a stage on which he arranged human figures in his own particular way. The charm and ingenuity of these curious images has no parallel in the history of photography. His conception of this art form was closely linked to his sense of humour, to a highly special aesthetic approach, and to his enormous curiosity about the small things of everyday life.”

Text: Bauret Gabriel. cm 23×26; pp. 168; 157 BW ills.; hardcover. Publisher: Hysteric Glamour, Tokyo, 2006.

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ID: OP-2673

Product Description

Comprising work produced throughout the span of Ueda’s professional life, from the 1930s through the 1990s, this book features photographs that were originally published in the now-defunct Camera Mainichi magazine between 1974 and 1985. From the Shoji Ueda Museum of Photography: “Shoji Ueda (1913-2000) is regarded as one of the most outstanding Japanese photographers of his time. Although he only left his native Tottori Prefecture on a few occasions, Ueda discovered the photographic innovations of the Western avant-garde through specialist publications that he received from time to time, and he felt drawn toward technical and aesthetic experimentation. Following a barren period during the Second World War, Ueda returned to his work and produced some of his most representative [imagery], in which the dunes of Tottori became a stage on which he arranged human figures in his own particular way. The charm and ingenuity of these curious images has no parallel in the history of photography. His conception of this art form was closely linked to his sense of humour, to a highly special aesthetic approach, and to his enormous curiosity about the small things of everyday life.”