What Is Art?: Conversations with Joseph Beuys

Joseph Beuys, in a letter to Manfred Schradi, October 21, 1971: “I know that from him [Rudolf Steiner] a mission was given to me to gradually remove people’s alienation and mistrust toward the supersensible through my means. In political thinking the field I have to be working on daily it is a matter of realizing the Threefold Social Order as quickly as possible.” – – – – – – – – – – – – – – Joseph Beuys’s work continues to influence and inspire artists and thinkers around the world in areas from organizational learning, direct democracy, and new forms of money, to new methods of art education and the practice of “ecological art.” Volker Harlan a close colleague of Beuys whose own work also explores substance and sacrament talked with Beuys about the deeper motivations and insights behind “social sculpture” and his expanded view of art. These profound reflections, complemented by Harlan’s thoughtful essays, give a sense of the interconnected nature of all life forms and provide the basis for a path toward a future that is ecologically sustainable.

Text: Harlan Volker . pp. 128; BW ills.; paperback. Publisher: Clairview Books, 2004.

ISBN: 9781905570072 | 1905570074
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ID: 22939

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Joseph Beuys, in a letter to Manfred Schradi, October 21, 1971: “I know that from him [Rudolf Steiner] a mission was given to me to gradually remove people’s alienation and mistrust toward the supersensible through my means. In political thinking the field I have to be working on daily it is a matter of realizing the Threefold Social Order as quickly as possible.” – – – – – – – – – – – – – – Joseph Beuys’s work continues to influence and inspire artists and thinkers around the world in areas from organizational learning, direct democracy, and new forms of money, to new methods of art education and the practice of “ecological art.” Volker Harlan a close colleague of Beuys whose own work also explores substance and sacrament talked with Beuys about the deeper motivations and insights behind “social sculpture” and his expanded view of art. These profound reflections, complemented by Harlan’s thoughtful essays, give a sense of the interconnected nature of all life forms and provide the basis for a path toward a future that is ecologically sustainable.

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