Présentées dans un ordre chronologique mais sans autre continuité, les images sont extraites de leur contexte signifiant et réagencées dans les page du livre. La mise en page en mosaïque spécialement développée pour cette publication ne produit pas une séquence rigide, mais constitue une structure flexible qui anime toutes les pages, entrecoupées d’espaces blancs à des intervalles qui semblent aléatoires. Les photographies sont accompagnées d’une interview d’Alex Hanimann par Hans Ulrich Obrist, ainsi que de courts essais de Lorenzo Benedetti et de Ludwig Seyfarth.

Trapped is a massive illustrated book comprised of over 500 snapshots of domestic and exotic animals, mostly taken at night by automatically triggered camera traps. Originally taken for scientific purposes in various habitats and climatic zones, Swiss artist and professor, Alex Hanimann (b. 1955), gathers and presents these surreal compositions to raise questions about the authorship and use of digital pictures. By embedding them in the context of art, each highly idiosyncratic shot may be reassessed according to formal artistic criteria such as lighting, cropping and texture, apart from its original purpose of recording animal behavior at night. Despite Hanimanns contemplative indexing, however, the viewer must grapple with the voyeuristic element of the process. Peering at animals at night in their natural habitats creates a feeling of almost paparazzi intrusiona stark moment loaded with issues regarding human intervention in nature. With 350 pages overflowing with images, Trapped is engaging right to the end.

A collection of works chosen for this publication by the artist. Drawn primarily from Katz’s personal collection, they feature portraits of family and friends preserving a dimension of experience that is intimate and pictorially striking. Interview by David Salle; texts by Vincent Katz and Enzo Cucchi.

American author Ben Lerner and German filmmaker and writer Alexander Kluge come from two different generations but share a single passion: an interest in the long-term effects of things. A line from Lerner’s poem “The Sky Stops Painting and Turns to Criticism,” which Kluge was struck by some years ago, became the starting point for their first joint book project. Kluge responded to this celestial critique with a story about the technically controlled power of a squadron of bombers in the skies over Aleppo, which Lerner answered with a sonnet.

Step by step this dialogue gave rise to poems, stories and conversations in which the heavens reveal their bewitching and threatening qualities. A series of 21 photographs that Gerhard Richter took in Venice in the 1970s augments the interplay of texts and the principle of interconnecting poetic horizons, as well as images by Rebecca H. Quaytman and Thomas Demand.

Ben Lerner (born 1979) is the author of 10:04 and Leaving the Atocha Station as well as three books of poetry. He is based in Brooklyn and is a professor of English at Brooklyn College.

Alexander Kluge (born 1932) is the author and director of numerous novels and films. A student of Theodor Adorno and assistant to Fritz Lang, Kluge has won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival four times and nearly every major German-language literature award.

Lua Cão accompanies a four-part exhibition of digital and 16mm film by Portuguese artist Alexandre Estrela (born 1971) and artist duo João Maria Gusmão (born 1979) and Pedro Paiva (born 1977). The catalog gathers photographs, conversations, emails and essays by critics, curators and participants of the interactive film installation.

Trapped is a massive illustrated book comprised of over 500 snapshots of domestic and exotic animals, mostly taken at night by automatically triggered camera traps. Originally taken for scientific purposes in various habitats and climatic zones, Swiss artist and professor, Alex Hanimann (b. 1955), gathers and presents these surreal compositions to raise questions about the authorship and use of digital pictures. By embedding them in the context of art, each highly idiosyncratic shot may be reassessed according to formal artistic criteria such as lighting, cropping and texture, apart from its original purpose of recording animal behavior at night. Despite Hanimanns contemplative indexing, however, the viewer must grapple with the voyeuristic element of the process. Peering at animals at night in their natural habitats creates a feeling of almost paparazzi intrusiona stark moment loaded with issues regarding human intervention in nature. With 350 pages overflowing with images, Trapped is engaging right to the end.

Lua Cão is the eleventh publication in Kunstverein München’s Companion series, and corresponds to an exhibition by Alexandre Estrela and João Maria Gusmão & Pedro Paiva. Initiated by Natxo Checa at ZdB in Lisbon, then optimized for Munich with Kunstverein München, the exhibition is an immersive moving-image experiment, with a projectionist arranging 20 analog films and digital videos by Estrela and Gusmão & Paiva in five 15-minute constellations, according to a 4-hour technical script. This publication departs from the exhibition to recount the endless encounters of Tom, an avid image consumer, and Jerry, a zealous projectionist, through more than 150 texts (in English and German) by Alexandre Estrela, Chris Fitzpatrick, João Maria Gusmão, Pedro Paiva, and Post Brothers. Designed by Julie Peeters, the A4 publication is punctuated by a series of 10 full color collages that Estrela and Gusmão & Paiva produced collaboratively by superimposing film stills and video stills from the exhibition.

Die Publikation «Birdwatching» von Alex Hanimann erscheint anlässlich der Ausstellung in der Neuen Kunsthalle St.Gallen, die in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Musée d’art moderne et contemporain (mamco), Genf realisiert wurde. Für «Birdwatching» hat Alex Hanimann in den Ausstellungsraum Volieren (zwei in Genf, vier in St. Gallen) eingebaut und sie wie für einen Laborversuch einmal in Schwarz-Weiss, einmal in Rot-Blau ausgemalt. Die Volieren sind von zahlreichen bunten Kanarienvögeln bewohnt. Es sind keine gewöhnlichen Käfige, die Hanimann in den Ausstellungsraum stellt. Seine Volieren haben feste Wände und stellen viel Farbe zur Schau. Es sind zusammengesetzte, monochrome Felder, die an radikale Positionen der Malerei erinnern. So soll der amerikanische Künstler Barnett Newman Betrachter aufgefordert haben, sich in der Unermesslichkeit der Farbe zu verlieren wie ein Vogel im Himmelszelt. Bei Hanimann erinnern die riesigen Dimensionen der farbigen Käfigwände an die Leinwände des Amerikaners. Nur ist uns als Betrachter die freie Sicht durch Maschendraht verdeckt. Die Farbkanarien setzten bunte Akzente dahinter, ständig umher flatternd, und uns dabei die Konzentration raubend. Die wunderbar leichte, malerische Installation von Alex Hanimann findet in der Publikation «Birdwatching» eine adäquate Umsetzung, die über den umfangreichen Bildteil hinaus auch Textmaterial zu einem vertieften Studium anbietet.

To mark the occasion of Alexander Kluge’s eighty-fifth birthday, the Museum Folkwang is organizing a comprehensive show of the work of the film-maker, writer, philosopher, and artist. The exhibition is an introduction to Kluge’s artistic “pluriverse” and sets out to illustrate his main methods, themes, and conceptual approaches, with the central focus on his filmic collages. The accompanying book picks up on the themes addressed in the exhibition and concentrates on the principle of work collaboration, which is of key importance for Kluge: the process of “thinking together” with academics and artists, such as Thomas Demand, Georg Baselitz, and Ben Lerner. Both the book and the exhibition are being produced in close collaboration with Alexander Kluge. “Alexander Kluge: Pluriverse” is at the Museum Folkwang Essen from 15 September 2017 to 7 January 2018 and at the 21er Haus in Vienna from February to April 2018.

his publication, edited by Enzo Cucchi and published by NERO, gathers drawings by Alex Katz and words by Vincent Katz. It is a project that takes shape through the intimate relationship between the three subjects. All the drawings are risograph printings of both original sketches for paintings and the artist’s exercises. Two smaller inserts present, on the front, woodcuts showing portraits of two Katz, father and son, conceived by Enzo Cucchi, and on the back two poems by Vincent Katz, one of which is dedicated to Enzo Cucchi.

The austere fashion and interdisciplinary designs of Alexander van Slobbe epitomize contemporary Dutch style. Drawn to modernist abstraction, simple, rudimentary structures, innovative materials and a variety of production styles (including traditional methods), Van Slobbe has said that he hopes to see “a more democratic relation with a public in which I as a designer no longer set the scene but offer conditions,” and a running theme throughout his career has been the positing of fashion as a platform for collaboration with architects, artists and writers. And And And is presented in an unusual book design by Mevis & Van Deursen, and provides a detailed context for van Slobbe’s work in new essays and images that offer an expansive assessment of the designer’s now widely influential practice.

Louise Bourgeois was an immensely influential sculptor and oneof the iconic figures of twentieth and early twenty-first centuryart. She died in May 2010, aged ninety-eight.In the last year of her life, she invited the artist Alex van Gelderto stay at her New York town house and photograph her. Morethan purely a portrait project, she considered the collaborationto be an extension of her work, allowing her person to beviewed as a segment of her art.Of the hundreds of pictures that van Gelder took, it is thosewhich depict her hands against the black of her clothes thatastonish most: gnarled, sinewy and wrinkled with age, they werethe tools which produced her extraordinary work. This beautifulbook presents twenty of Van Gelderøs portraits of Bourgeoisøshands, each on a double-page spread and accompanied bycomments by the artist.

City portraits were a favorite theme of avant-garde photographers. The booming industrial metropolises, whose faces were to change radically within a few years, called for a new vision and unaccustomed perspectives. This is revealed in The New Moscow, Aleksandr Rodchenko’s view of the capital of the then still young Soviet Union, whose dynamic awakening during the Socialist era inspired the avant-garde artist to create this unusual project. After being expelled from the October group in 1932, Rodchenko was commissioned to take pictures of Moscow. Out of this series Varvara Stepanova, his wife and colleague, compiled a narrative sequence of eight-nine gelatin silver prints adding to it some photographs from the October period. The photos of street parades, housing projects, technical buildings, new sport facilities, and factories taken between the late twenties and early thirties were meant to appeal on two levels: firstly for their new aesthetics—the famous Rodchenko perspective and secondly for their film-like sequencing. The artist prepared the series for a 1933 edition, which was never published. Many of his high quality vintage prints were preserved, however, and are now published in a complete reconstruction of The New Moscow.

• Over 80 photos
• Will be of interest from a photographic as well as cinematic viewpoint
• Compelling document of what was then a young Soviet Union

The striking mobile sculptures of Alexander Calder are among the most notable and original creations of twentieth-century art. Combining for the first time movement and sculpture, these works represent a new and highly influential departure from the practices of the past. Yet Calder’s work ranges much more widely. This lavishly illustrated book reflects the full diversity of Calder’s oeuvre and explores an outstanding selection of more than two hundred of his works.

Based on access to family archives, an overview of Calder’s entire career, and contributions from the artist’s grandson Alexander S. C. Rower, this book for the first time presents the artist in a serious light and proper historical context.

Without ignoring the playful and whimsical dimension of his work, the book emphasizes Calder’s role as one of the great formal innovators of the century. Each work of art selected from those produced during his prolific career is reproduced here in color and is accompanied by comparative works, informative essays, and extensive chronology.

This book is the catalogue of a major centenary exhibit that opens at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., on March 29, 1998 and then travels to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Among his many facets, Alexander Iolas (1907-1987) is recognized as a great champion of Surrealism in America, and for mounting Andy Warhol’s first gallery exhibition and Ed Ruscha’s first solo show in New York. A fantastic character and passionate art lover, Iolas built deep personal relationships and facilitated intercontinental connections among artists, gallerists and collectors via his galleries in Athens, Geneva, Madrid, Milan, New York and Paris. Noted for the pivotal role he played in the building of the Menil Collection in Houston, Iolas operated according to his own taste and discerning eye. This fully illustrated publication includes archival photographs and installation views documenting the artworks, movements, personalities and friendships spanning critical periods in the art of the twentieth century. It includes work by Giorgio de Chirico, William Copley, Joseph Cornell, Max Ernst, Lucio Fontana, Yves Klein, René Magritte, Ed Ruscha, Niki de Saint Phalle, Takis, Dorothea Tanning, Paul Thek and Andy Warhol.

a major exhibition of paintings with the artist-in-residence at Mont Chateau Lodge, Morgantown, West Virginia, August 1st to 31st

This publication, printed on two special papers, focuses on Alexander Rodchenko’s Spatial Constructions, most of which were created around 1920. It begins with facsimile images of Rodchenko’s sketchpads, two spreads to a page, continues with the artist’s groundbreaking wooden sculptural models, and then delves into a series of drawings, paintings and commercial and graphic works. Also features architectural drawings and a cover that folds out to create a poster of a sculptural Spatial Construction in the Surfaces Reflecting Light” series.

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