Lucido protagonista della “nuova topografia” americana degli anni settanta, artista costantemente impegnato a decostruire la politica dei luoghi e delle rappresentazioni, sin dai suoi esordi Lewis Baltz ha accompagnato alla ricerca visiva una meditata attività di scrittura critica e autocritica. Le riflessioni raccolte in questo volume illuminano da prospettive differenti la sua opera ultraquarantennale e il contesto transatlantico nel quale si è sviluppata: interventi che hanno affiancato le opere topografiche del primo periodo, narrazioni incorporate nei lavori testo-immagine della fine degli anni ottanta, ma anche una corposa serie di saggi dedicati ad alcuni tra i più importanti fotografi e artisti del Novecento. In questi ultimi l’ascolto dell’enigmatica materialità delle opere si fonde con un ragionare secco e disincantato sulla loro adeguatezza culturale e, infine, politica. Rientrano in tale filone gli scritti dedicati a Walker Evans, Edward Weston, Robert Adams, Michael Schmidt, Allan Sekula, Thomas Ruff e Jeff Wall, che in modi diversi interrogano le possibilità e i limiti delle pratiche fotografiche di stampo modernista; in alcuni passi affiorano inoltre circostanziati apprezzamenti di artisti come Krzysztof Wodiczko, Felix Conzàlez-Torres, Barry Le Va, Chris Burden, James Turrell, Robert Irwin, John McLaughlin e Alessandro Laita, con i quali Baltz ha condiviso aspetti cruciali della ricerca e, in diversi casi, della propria biografia…

Violence is in language and violence is language. The violence of language stratifies voices into those that matter and those that do not, using ideas of appropriate form and structure as its weaponry. It claims propriety and politeness are the correct mode of address, when urgency and anger are what is needed. Where languages intersect, hierarchies of language become means for domination and colonization, for othering, suppression, negation, and obliteration. The demand for a correctness of grammar, the refusal to see what is seen as incorrect, the dismissal of vernacular in favour of the homogenised tongue: all are violent. The narrative of history is a narrative of violence. The contributions herein refuse this narrative. They explore how violence permeates and performs in language, how language may be seized, taken back to be used against the overwhelming force of structural and institutional violence that passes as acceptable or normal. Violence may be a force for rupture, for refusal, for dissent, for the herstories that refuse to cohere into a dominant narrative. Contributors: Travis Alabanza, Katherine Angel, Skye Arundhati-Thomas, Mieke Bal, Janani Balasubramanian, Elena Bajo, Jordan Baseman, Emma Bolland, Pavel Büchler, Paul Buck,Kirsten Cooke, Jih-Fie Cheng, John Cunningham, Andy Fisher, Caspar Heinemann, Jakob Kolding, Candice Lin, Rudy Loewe, Nick Mwaluko, Vanessa Place, Katharina Poos, Tai Shani, Linda Stupart, Benjamin Swaim, Jonathan Trayner, Jala Wahid, Isobel Wohl, Sarah Wood

Faraway, So Close 25th Biennial of Design, Ljubljana Museum of Architecture and Design (MAO) Faraway, So Close presents seven investigations through the concept of time – time as a key with which to identify new patterns that can connect design with the phenomenological world and the myriad consequences of such an interrelation. Acting in various dispersed territories across Slovenia, Faraway, So Close seeks out “low-intensity” places in which to test the possibility of changing our notions of economic progress and which could work toward and in the name of such fundamental aspirations as stability, community and a better future. Design is, or at least can be, a vehicle for exploring basic new metaphors. It is a dialogic procedure. This break from the strictly disciplinary approach of design creates space for an expansive investigation of various interdisciplinary intersections and engagement with a markedly different production of knowledge. By presenting the seven investigative episodes developed within BIO 25 and their interchange with both local archives and broader paradigms, the book works to explore ways of changing the goals of design culture; of turning away from the urgent need to solve problems and instead opening up new frontiers for observation and experimentation, to look at our inhabited and habitable world for what it is and what it is becoming, and not simply what we think it should, ideally, be. Contributions by Nabil Ahmed Andrea Branzi Tony Côme Brendan Cormier matali crasset Domitilla Dardi Odo Fioravanti Didier Fiúza Faustino Studio Formafantasma Thomas Geisler Rory Hyde Alexandra Midal mischer’traxler studio Dimitrij Mlekuž Point Supreme Architects Emanuele Quinz Renata Salecl Anna-Sophie Springer Studio Folder James Westcott Elia Zenghelis and many others Photographic Essays by Delfino Sisto Legnani and Marco Cappelletti

This book presents 123 calling cards of artists (painters, sculptors, photographers, architects, graphic designers, illustrators etc.) from the 18th century to the present day. The facsimiled cards are slipped like bookmarks into a book by several authors on the history of the use of calling cards, the social context in which they were produced, and related historical and fictional narratives. The often unexpected graphic qualities of these personalized objects, each designed to capture an individual identity within the narrow confines of a tiny rectangle card, implicitly recount a history of taste and typographic codes in the West. But this calling card collection also lays the foundations for a microhistory of art, inspired by the Italian microstoria, or a looser narrative that breaks free from geographic contexts and historical periods. We can imagine how social networks were formed before the advent of Facebook, and how artists defined themselves in the social sphere, whether they were students or teachers, dean of the art school or museum curator, founder of a journal, firm, restaurant or political party, and so on. Superimposed on this imaginary or idealized network formed by chance encounters is a living network of students of art or history, historians or anthropologists, librarians, archivists, gallerists, museum curators and artists themselves, the network upon which this pocket museum is constructed. The sheer variety of perspectives and stories brought together here makes this book a prodigious forum for discussion. The carded artists include: Absalon, Anni and Josef Albers, John Armleder, Iain Baxter, Larry Bell, Joseph Beuys, Joseph Binder, Max Bill, Pierrette Bloch, Rosa Bonheur, Irma Boom, Aglaüs Bouvenne, Constantin Brancusi, Marcel Broodthaers, Antonio Canova, Caran d’Ache, A.M. Cassandre, Chenue malletier, Iris Clert, Claude Closky, Le Corbusier, Silvie Défraoui, Sonia Delaunay, Fortunato Depero, Marcel Duchamp, A.R. Dunton, Céline Duval, Nathalie Du Pasquier, Yan Duyvendak, Daniel Eatock, Edward Fella, Sylvie Fleury, Schwestern Flöge, Piero Fornasetti, Hans Frank, Lene Frank, Emile Gallé, General Idea, Dan Graham, Wolfgang von Gœthe, Jean-Baptiste Greuze, Walter Gropius, Guerrilla Girls, Hector Guimard, Friedrich Haeffcke, Raymond Hains, Keith Haring, Raoul Hausmann, John Heartfield, Anton Herrgesell, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Ray Johnson, Ana Jotta, Wassily Kandinsky, André Kertész, Martin Kippenberger, Paul Klee, Johann Adam Klein, Yves Klein, Július Koller, Joseph Kosuth, Yayoi Kusama, Carl Gotthard Langhans, Fernand Léger, Pierre Leguillon, George Maciunas, Robert Mallet-Stevens, Edouard Manet, Piero Manzoni, Christian Marclay, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Karel Martens, Annette Messager, Lucia Moholy, Piet Mondrian, Valérie Mréjen, Félix Nadar, Isamu Noguchi, The Offices of Jenny Holzer, Peter Nadin, Richard Prince and al., Yoko Ono, Claes Oldenburg, Nam June Paik, Francis Picabia, Adrian Piper, Emil Pirchan, Man Ray, Les ready made appartiennent à tout le monde®, Carl August Reinhardt, Gerrit Rietveld, Auguste Rodin, Edward Ruscha, Alexander Search, Willem Sandberg, Erik Satie, Gino Severini, Johan Gottfried Schadow, Egon Schiele, Oskar Schlemmer, Käthe Schmidt, Roman Signer, Alec Soth, Gertrude Stein and Alice Toklas, Jack Smith, Hélène Smith, Harald Szeemann, Sophie Taeuber, Karel Teige, Oliviero Toscani, Theo van Doesburg, Roman Vishniac, Andy Warhol, Weegee, Neill Whistler, Heimo Zobernig, Piet Zwart, Emmy Zweybrück Prochaska With texts by: Samuel Adams, Damarice Amao, Daniel Baumann, Stuart Bertolotti-Bailey, Géraldine Beck, Paul Bernard, Christian Besson, Christianna Bonin, Véronique Borgeaud, Marie de Brugerolle, Garance Chabert, Kyrill Charbonnel, Yann Chateigné, Manuel Cirauqui, Chiara Costa, Caroline Coutau, Jean-Baptiste Delorme, Carla Demierre, Dakota DeVos, Corinne Diserens, Eva Fabbris, Patricia Falguières, Arthur Fink, Sophie Gayerie, Kati Gegenheimer, Mark Thomas Gibson, Nicolas Giraud, Victor Guégan, Andrea Gyorody, Nastassja Haidinger, Dean Inkster, Aurélie Jacquet, Elisabeth Jobin, Vincent Jolivet, Moritz Küng, Angela Lampe, Charlotte Laubard, Anaël Lejeune, Quentin Lannes, Pierre Leguillon, Charlotte Magnin, Nicole Marchand-Zañartu, Valérie Mavridorakis, Aurélien Mole, Michael J. Moore, Adrien Mouginot, Christiane Mühlegger, Émilie Parendeau, Ying Sze Pek, Corine Pencenat, Mathias Pfund, Fabien Pinaroli, Raphaël Pirenne, Paulo Pires do Vale, Carrie Pilto, Frans Postma, Jeanne Quéheillard, Fabienne Radi, Ivan Ristić, Vincent de Roguin, Paul-Louis Roubert, Margot Sanitas, Gilles Saussier, Elana Shapira, Klaus-Peter Speidel, Friedrich Tietjen, Rebecca Topakian, Gesine Tosin, Xiaoda Wang, Christophe Wavelet, David Zerbib, Célia Zuber Co-published by HEAD – Genève (Geneva University of Art and Design) and Edition Patrick Frey under the patronage of the Museum of Mistakes Editors: Pierre Leguillon in collaboration with Barbara Fédier and Kyrill Charbonnel, Pauline Cordier, Aurélie Jacquet, Aline Melaet, Anaïs Perez, and Charlotte Schaer, students of WorkMaster at HEAD – Genève

Ogni artista prende le mosse da alcune fonti di ispirazione tentando un superamento dei modelli che lo hanno preceduto: il volume è dedicato alla tensione generata da questo agone a distanza, un tema che rivela diverse sfaccettature: il confronto tra l’artista e la sua pietra di paragone (dalle figure arcaiche di Mario Sironi ai ritratti fotografici di August Sander, Walker Evans, Thomas Ruff), la sfida alle proprie certezze espressive (come negli autoritratti di Roberto Cuoghi e Urs Lüthi), la performance del corpo dell’artista (nelle immagini ad esempio di Gunther Brüs e Marina Abramovic, o di Pino Pascali ritratto da Claudio Abate), il conflitto linguistico fra i due media (da Paolo Gioli a Vincenzo Agnetti, solo per citarne alcuni). Il volume accoglie fotografie e disegni di cento artisti che ripercorrono gli ultimi cento anni della storia dell’arte.

Theodor W. Adorno described artworks as windowless monads, for it is through their double character as both autonomous and “fait social” that unsolved antagonisms of reality return in them as immanent problems of form. Socially committed contemporary artists, however, experiment with other spheres of reference. They involve human beings as actors in communicative processes of reality construction, thus creating new spaces of possibility. The “New Relations in Art and Society” conference hosted by the Campus Museum of the Art Collections of the Ruhr-University of Bochum (RUB) considered this challenge. Taking the exhibition “Mischa Kuball: NEW POTT” and the mentioned conference as their starting point, various authors reflected on positions of participation in socially engaged art, discussing theoretical frameworks, artistic projects, and institutional challenges. This book presents participatory art projects and includes contributions from Claire Bishop, Beatrice Gibson, Thomas Hirschhorn, Sandra Höptner, Mischa Kuball, Kristin Marek, Nina Möntmann, Jacques Rancière, Eva Schmidt, Gerald Schröder, Beate Söntgen, Apolonia Sustersic, Franz Erhard Walther, Friederike Wappler, Astrid Wege, Lawrence Weiner and Harald Welzer. The publication is part of the series of artists’ projects edited by Christoph Keller.

At the end of the 1960s in the USA a group of painters stepped out of the shadows of Abstract Expressionism and turned towards the tradition of painterly realism but, however, in doing so they also exaggerated the illusionism that had been handed down from the 1920s and 1930s. These painters often used the photographic image as a verbatim model but could ‘correct’ the photographs as Chuck Close did in his portraits by placing different photos next to each other in order to give each segment of the picture its own focal point and, in a complex work process, turning photography into painting. Starting from the MUMOK’s extensive collection of 40 works, this major exhibition places the museum’s own holdings in a context of realisms and investigates the concepts behind a painting genre that is determined by the subject matter of the city, streets, automobiles and the American way of life. Time and again the Photorealists emphasised the importance of Pop Art some of which is shown at the start of the exhibition before the presentation of the main protagonists. Artists represented in the exhibition include: Richard Artschwager, Peter Blake, Chuck Close, Thomas Demand, William Eggleston, Eric Fischl, Andreas Gursky, Richard Hamilton, Duane Hanson, David Hockney, Candida Höfer, Jasper Johns, Alex Katz, Jeff Koons, Louise Lawler, Roy Lichtenstein, Malcolm Morley, Tom Phillips, Sigmar Polke, Mel Ramos, Gerhard Richter, James Rosenquist, Thomas Ruff, Ed Ruscha, Markus Schinwald, Cindy Sherman, Thomas Struth, Jeff Wall, Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselmann.

n the landscape photography chosen for this catalogue, there is one thing that all the pictures have in common: the horizon is missing. The catalogue shows works by 15 international contemporary photographers, each of whom in their own specific view of landscape blends out the separating and and defining horizon. The absence of the horizon as a borderline between heaven and earth, as an orientation mark between above and below, is demonstrated by the illustrated photographs, opening up new and unforeseen perspectives of landscapes that seem familiar to us. Accepted patterns of reception and the self-assurance of man in his place in the world, for which the visible horizon is all-important, are questioned in very different ways. Works by: Dieter Appelt, Boris Becker, Daniel Gustav Cramer, Natalie Czech, Miklos Gaál, Andreas Gefeller, Jitka Hanzlová, Naoya Hatakeyama, Zhao Liang, Taiji Matsue, Walter Niedermayr, Thomas Struth, Adam Thompson, Timm Ulrichs, Thomas Wrede

The Berlin Wall fell almost 20 years ago, and since then a generation of artists has come of age in reunified Germany. Reality Bites investigates the effect of that historical context, identifying the new kinds of work that have grown out of it, full of strategies and materials borrowed from and referring back to one kind of recent German reality or another, aesthetic exploration of experience in which the themes of reality and history take on increased meaning. This representative selection of about 70 pieces created since 1989 includes work from Franz Ackermann, Kutlug Ataman, Sophie Calle, Tacita Dean, Thomas Demand, Sabine Hornig, Christian Jankowski, Andre Korpys, Markus Loffler, Via Lewandowsky, rude_architecture, Gregor Schneider, Collier Schorr, Wolfgang Tillmans. Among those less known to U.S. audiences are Cosima von Bonin, born in Kenya, who plays curator, critic, DJ and producer in the course of her sometimes risque work; Rudolf Herz, whose Lenin on tour put busts of the great leader on the back of a flatbed and took them on the road; and Renata Stih and Frieder Schnock, whose “Places of Remembrance,” in Berlin’s Bavarian Quarter and “Bus Stop,” Holocaust Memorial project build the city’s history into its streetscape.

A personal encounter with 50 of the world’s most significant contemporary artists, “pressPlay” draws together the full texts of the complete Phaidon interviews with living artists, 1995-2005, originally appearing in “Phaidon’s Contemporary Artists” series and “Robert Mangold” monograph. Highlights include veteran painter Vija Celmins and noted sculptor Robert Gober (who represented the US at the 2001 Venice Biennale) in an intimate discussion on their differing art practices; longtime friends and fellow travellers for decades, Benjamin Buchloh and Lawrence Weiner recall 35 years of work, in the definitive, career-long interview for this key Conceptual artist; the late Sir Ernst Gombrich honoured the “Contemporary Artists” series in a discussion with the UK’s pre-eminent sculptor Antony Gormley – who confesses that it was Gombrich’ “Story of Art” that first inspired him to become an artist; the taciturn, legendary Raymond Pettibon muses on the evolution of his work with noted hip novelist Dennis Cooper; musician artist Christian Marclay is interviewed by Sonic Youth rockstar Kim Gordon. From highly established artists Louise Bourgeois and Alex Katz, to midcareer masters Richard Prince, Mike Kelley, Fischli and Weiss, Jenny Holzer, and Raymond Pettibon, to the most exciting artists of the current generation, including Maurizio Cattelan, Olafur Eliasson and Pipilotti Rist, pressPlay is a highly readable, comprehensive look at contemporary art today. Vito Acconci/Mark C Taylor; Doug Aitken/Amanda Sharp; Uta Barth/Matthew Higgs; Christian Boltanski/Tamar Garb; Louise Bourgeois/Paulo Herkenhoff; Cai Guo Qiang/Octavio Zaya; Maurizio Cattelan/Nancy Spector; Vija Celmins/Robert Gober; Richard Deacon/Pier Luigi Tazzi; Mark Dion/Miwon Kwon; Stan Douglas/Diana Thater; Marlene Dumas/Barbara Bloom; Jimmie Durham/Dirk Snauwaert; Olafur Eliasson/Daniel Birnbaum; Peter Fischli and David Weiss/Beate Soentgen; Tom Friedman/Dennis Cooper; Isa Genzken/Diedrich Diederichsen; Antony Gormley/Sir Ernst Gombrich; Dan Graham/Mark Francis; Paul Graham/Gillian Wearing; Hans Haacke/Molly Nesbit; Mona Hatoum/Michael Archer; Thomas Hirschhorn/Alison M Gingeras; Jenny Holzer/Joan Simon; Roni Horn/Lynne Cooke; Ilya Kabakov/David A Ross; Alex Katz/Robert Storr; Mary Kelly/Douglas Crimp; Mike Kelley/Isabelle Graw; William Kentridge/Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev; Yayoi Kusama/Akira Tatehata; Robert Mangold/Sylvia Plimack Mangold; Christian Marclay/Kim Gordon; Paul McCarthy/Kristine Stiles; Cildo Meireles/Gerardo Mosquera; Lucy Orta/Roberto Pinto; Raymond Pettibon/Dennis Cooper; Richard Prince/Jeff Rian; Pipilotti Rist/Hans Ulrich Obrist; Doris Salcedo/Carlos Basualdo; Thomas Schutte/James Lingwood; Lorna Simpson/Thelma Golden; Nancy Spero/Jo Anna Isaak; Jessica Stockholder/Lynne Tillman; Wolfgang Tillmans/Peter Halley; Luc Tuymans/Juan Vicente Aliaga; Jeff Wall/Arielle Pelenc; Gillian Wearing/Donna De Salvo; Lawrence Weiner/Benjamin H D Buchloh; Franz West/Bice Curiger.

Architecture has always been a central subject matter for photographers. For most of the 20th century, however, the practice of architectural photography has been a professional endeavor; anonymous photographs taken for clients for specific, commercial reasons. This book concerns itself with another, rarer, topic: the photography of architecture as an art practice. It considers the work of seven contemporary photographers who use buildings in their work in a new way. In these photographs, they respond to the work of prominent architects by creating their own interpretations. Here are Andreas Gursky’s photos of the Stockhom Library by Gunnar Asplund, Tomas Ruff’s photos of several works by Herzog & de Meuron, Hiroshi Sugimoto’s photos of Le Corbusier’s Villa Savoye, as well as works by Candida Hofer, Jeff Wall, Gunther Forg, and Balthasar Burkhard. A beautiful and valuable book on one of the prominent movements in contemporary photography. Featuring: Andreas Gursky, Candida Hofer, Thomas Ruff, Jeff Wall, Gunther Forg, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Balthasar Burkhard Edited by Gloria Moure. Essays by Abalos & Enguita, Joerg Bader, Catherine Hurzeler, Hans Irrek, Gloria Moure, Barry Schwabsky, Jeff Wall and Martin Tschanz. Introduction by Terence Riley.

Since starting out as a photographer in the mid-1960s, Boris Mikhailov (b. Kharkov, Ukraine, 1938; lives and works in Kharkov and Berlin) has built a wide-ranging and strikingly multifaceted oeuvre. A virtuoso of his art, he has explored a great variety of ways of using the medium to paint a picture of his immediate surroundings that is as unsparing as it is ironic. His unflagging critical engagement of photographic techniques and the work with different cameras and stylistic devicesas well as the alternation in his oeuvre between conceptual photography and documentary approaches render him the preeminent present-day photographer whose work reaches back to the Soviet era. The book–which accompanies his largest exhibition in Germany to date–brings together a selection of works that includes the experimental pictures of his early years as well as his most recent photographs created in Berlin. With essays by Thomas Köhler, Christina Landbrecht, Olga Sviblova, and Jan Verwoert.

Multiples by: John L. Tancock, Abe Ajay, Otmar Alt, Arman, Jean Arp, Richard Artschwager,Enrico Baj, Mary Bauermeister, Miguel Berrocal, Joseph Beuys, Max Bill, Mel Bochner, Sandro Bocola, Hartmut Bohm, Agostino Bonalumi, Victor Bonato,Davide Boriani, Derek Boshier, Martha Boto, David Bradshaw, K.P. Brehmer,Marcel Broodthaers, Robert Bryant, Ursula Burghardt, Pol Bury, John Cage,Alexander Calder, Malcolm Carder, Enrico Castellani, Alik Cavaliere, Mario Ceroli, Thomas Chimes, Christo, Chryssa, Genevieve Claisse, Gianni Colombo,Kenelm Cox, Carlos Cruz-Diez, Bill Culbert, Allan D’Arcangelo, Sandro de Alexandris, Lucio Del Pezzo, H.R. Demarco, Walter De Maria, Jim Dine, Herbert Distel, Francesco Marino di Teana, Piero Dorazio, Angel Duarte, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Michel Fadt, Rafael Ferrer, Robert Filliou, Lucio Fontana,Horacio Garcia-Rossi, Karl Gerstner, Gilbert & George, Ludwig Gosewitz, Hans Haacke, Raymond Hains, Etienne Hajdu, Richard Hamilton, Maurice Henry,Eva Hesse, Charles Hinman, Karl Horst Dodicke, Douglas Huebler, Fritz Hendertwasser, Jean Ipousteguy, Allen Jones, Howard Jones, Donald Judd,Iwao Kagoshima, Stephen Kaltenbach, Pierre Keller, Milan Knizak, Piotr Kowalski, David Lamelas, Fernand Leger, Julio Le Parc, Sol LeWitt, Roy Lichtenstein, Shoji Lida, Liliane Lijn, Richard Lindner, Yuan-Chia Li, Bernard Luginbuhl, Adolf Luther, Rene Magritte, Piero Manzoni, Enzo Mari, Marisol,Gino Marotta, Henri Matisse, Paul Matisse, Rory McEwen, Tomio Miki, Marcello Morandini, Francois Morellet, Robert Morris, Bruno Munari, Bruce Nauman,Louise Nevelson, Kazuo Okazaki, Claes Oldenburg, Dennis Oppenheim, George Ortman, Claus Paeffgen, Palermo, Pavlos, Henry Pearson, David Pelham, Alicia Penalba, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Sigmar Polke, Arnaldo Pomodoro, Gio Pomodoro, William Pye, Edival Ramosa, Robert Rauschenberg, May Ray, Martial Raysse, Paul Reich, George Rickey, Larry Rivers, James Rosenquist, Dieter Rot [Dieter Roth], Mimmo Rotella, Gerhard Rühm, Edward Ruscha, Lucas Samaras,Remo Saraceni, Pedroni Sarenco, Alan Saret, Nicholas Schoffer, Peter Sedgley,George Segal, Richard Serra, Richard Smith, Tony Smith, Robert Smithson,Kenneth Snelson, Francisco Sobrino, Keith Sonnier, Jesus Raphael Soto, Daniel Spoerri, Klaus Staeck, Klaus Staudt, Joel Stein, Saul Steinberg, Kumi Sugai,George Sugarman, Takis, Paul Palman, Takao Tanabe, Andre Thomkins, Joe Tilson, Jean Tinguely, Luis Tomasello, David Tremlett, Ernest Trova, Michael Tyzack, Raoul Ubac, Gunther Uecker, De Wain Valentine, Gregorio Vardanega,Victor Vasarely, Wolf Vostell, Andy Warhol, Willy Weber, Lawrence Weiner,Gunter Wesler, Ludwig Wilding, Jean Pierre Yvaral

The book of the 11th edition of the international exhibition, curated by Argentinean curator Victoria Noorthoorn (gathering 78 artists from all over the world, mostly from Europe, Africa and Latin America), conceived as an autonomous montage of visual and verbal works engendering a multiplicity of meanings. Texts, works and contributions by Gabriel Acevedo Velarde, Ayreen Anastas, Roberto Arlt, The Artic Perspective Initiative, Ronaldo Azevedo, Zbynek Baladrán, Ernesto Ballesteros, Lenora de Barros, Hannah van Bart, Eduardo Basualdo, Samuel Beckett, Erick Beltrán, Walter Benjamin, Thomas Bernhard, Diego Bianchi, Guillaume Bijl, Arthur Bispo do Rosário, Pierre Bismuth, Katinka Bock, Jorge Luis Borges, Paul Bowles, Ulla von Brandenburg, Cyrille Bret, Fernando Bryce, François Bucher, Georg Büchner, William Burroughs, John Cage & Henning Lohner, Augusto de Campos, Beatriz Catani, The Center for Historical Reenactments, Virginia Chiota, Robbie Cornelissen, Marina De Caro, Jochen Dehn, Julien Discrit, Elsa Drucaroff, Marlene Dumas, Eschyle, Ariel Farace, Morton Feldman, Stano Filko, Robert Filliou, Yona Friedman, Aurélien Froment, Richard Buckminster Fuller, René Gabri, Carlos Gamerro, Witold Gombrowicz, Luis de Góngora y Argote, Milan Grygar, Joana Hadjithomas, Felisberto Hernández, Arturo Herrera, Homère, Michel Huisman, Jessica Hutchins, Roberto Jacoby, Yun-Fei Ji, Khalil Joreige, Franz Kafka, Christoph Keller, Irina Kirchuk, Lúcia Koch, Eva Kotátkova, Robert Kusmirowski, Osvaldo Lamborghini, Luciana Lamothe, Moshekwa Langa, Langer, Ruth Laskey, Guillaume Leblon, Kemang Wa Lehulere, Christian Lhopital, Laura Lima, Jarbas Lopes, Jorge Macchi, Linda Matalon, Cildo Meireles, Ruben Mira, Laurent Montaron, María Moreno, Hugo Mujica, Victoria Noorthoorn, The Otolith Group, Bernardo Ortiz, Juan L. Ortiz, Nicolás Paris, Sarah Pierce, Dominique Petitgand, Garrett Phelan, Sarah Rapson, Thierry Raspail, Tracey Rose, José Alejandro Restrepo, Alexander Schellow, Benjamin Seror, Gabriel Sierra, Tom Stoppard, Elly Strik, Jonathan Swift, Neal Tait, Alejandro Tantanian, Javier Téllez, Daniela Thomas, Barthélemy Toguo, Erika Verzutti, Miguel Vitagliano, Christophe Wavelet, Judi Werthein, William Butler Yeats, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, Héctor Zamora.

Andy Warhol’s silk screens, Gerhard Richter’s blurred images, Vija Celmins’ hyperrealism: some of the most influential developments in the history of contemporary art hinge on the use of photographs as source material. Beginning in the early 60s, with seminal works by the aforementioned artists, The Painting of Modern Life charts the 45-year evolution of the translation of photographic images to paint–revealing an extraordinary breadth of stylistic and thematic diversity. This volume features 22 painters whose sources range from snapshots to commercial media, among them Richard Artschwager, Robert Bechtle, Celmins, Peter Doig, Marlene Dumas, Thomas Eggerer, Judith Eisler, Franz Gertsch, Richard Hamilton, Eberhard Havekost, David Hockney, Johannes Kahrs, Johanna Kandl, Martin Kippenberger, Liu Xiaodong, Malcolm Morley, Elizabeth Peyton, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Richter, Wilhelm Sasnal, Luc Tuymans and Warhol. Essays by curator Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, writer and critic Martin Herbert, Hayward Director Ralph Rugoff and poet and critic, Barry Schwabsky lend insight to issues of translation, context and content.

With the hotly discussed resurgence of painting at the dawn of the new century, it is clear that reports of the medium’s death have been greatly exaggerated. “Painting at the Edge of the World” explores the possibilities of a redefinition and ”hybridization” of painting begun in the 1960s, examining the manifestations of these new artistic vistas in the present day. This full-color catalogue features illustrations and a variety of critical texts by some of the most exciting established and emerging critical voices working today, in addition to work by an international and intergenerational group of artists hailing from places as diverse as Brazil, Ethiopia, Germany, South Africa, Scotland, Japan, Belgium, Iran, Italy, and the United States. Designed in two sections–a gatefold plate section containing reproductions of the work, and a french-folded section containing critical essays–the book brings together a wide range of contemporary views on painting from a diverse array of disciplines, including the visual arts, film, architecture, design, and music in an attempt to assess the relevance of painting in the contemporary global context. In addition, “Painting at the Edge of the World” includes documentation of each artist’s work and an examination of their artistic methodology. Essays by: Daniel Birnbaum, Paulo Herkenhoff, Midori Matsui, Jorg Heiser, Frances Stark, Andrew Blauvelt, Reindaldo Laddaga, Yves-Alain Bois, Helio Oiticica, Takashi Murakami, Mike Kelley, and Cuauhtemoc Medina. Introduction by Douglas Fogle. Featuring artworks by: Franz Ackerman, Haluk Akakçe, Francis Alÿs, Kevin Appel, Marcel Broodthaers, John Currin, Marlene Dumas, Andreas Gursky, Eberhard Havekost, Arturo Herrera, Mike Kelley, Martin Kippenberger, Udomsak Krisanamis, Jim Labie, Margherita Manzelli, Paul McCarthy, Lucy McKenzie, Julie Mehretu, Takashi Murakami, Nader, Chris Ofili, Helio Oiticica, Michael Raedecker, Thomas Scheibitz, Rudolph Stingel, Hiroshi Sugito, Paul Thek, and Richard Wright.

La storia del rapporto tra l’arte e il “mondo delle notizie stampate” inizia con il Cubismo e con le avanguardie del primo Novecento, attraversa tutto il secolo e giunge fino a noi articolandosi in modi sempre nuovi. Su questo rapporto è incentrata la straordinaria collezione dei coniugi Annette e Peter Nobel, di cui questo catalogo presenta un’ampia e significativa selezione. Il saggio di Jean Baudrillard e gli altri saggi che accompagnano le 370 opere riprodotte non si limitano a ripercorre la storia di questo rapporto, ma ci aiutano a capire la rilevanza che esso assume nei nostri anni, in cui fotografie e notizie ci inseguono ovunque, veicolate non solo dalla stampa ma anche da smartphone, computer ecc., facendosi sempre più pervasive. Tra i numerosi artisti rappresentati: Jean Arp, John Baldessari, George Baselitz, Joseph Beuys, Alighiero e Boetti, Georges Braque, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Christo, Fortunato Depero, Walker Evans, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Urs Fischer, Gilbert & George, Nan Goldin, Richard Hamilton, John Heartfield, Thomas Hirschhorn, Dennis Hopper, Roni Horn, Alfredo Jaar, William Kentridge, Willem de Kooning, Joseph Kosuth, Jannis Kpunellis, Le Corbusier, Roy Lichtenstein, Joan Mirò, Gianni Motti, Sigmar Polke, Richard Prince, Man Ray, Gerhard Richter, Dieter Roth, Edward Ruscha, Kurt Schwitters, Cindy Sherman, David Shrigley, Roman Signer, Antoni Tàpies, Zhou Tiehai, Wolfgan Tillmans.

Publié à l’occasion de l’exposition Coollustre à la Collection Lambert en Avignon (24 mai – 28 septembre 2003), ce catalogue richement illustré documente les trois expositions d’Eric Troncy : Dramatically Different (centre national d’art contemporain Le Magasin, Grenoble, 1997) ; Weather Everything (Musée de Leipzig, 1998) et Coollustre (collection Lambert, 2003). « Comme j’écris, je suis le spectateur à venir de l’exposition qui m’occupe déjà dans sa fabrication. Celle-ci, comme je le crois les précédentes, n’atteint pas aujourd’hui ce stade si proche de son visage ultime au prix d’une pénétration globale dont elle serait la matérialisation exacte. A la différence des précédentes, cependant, les accidents qui auront présidé à son architecture finale n’auront pas été dus aux réponses des artistes invités. Pour la première fois, en ce qui me concerne, il s’agit d’une exposition faite avec les oeuvres et non, de manière générale, avec les artistes. Elle ne s’entend pas non plus comme la démonstration d’une idée précise, la réalisation de quelque chose qu’aurait précédé une pensée achevée. Comme le signale Liam Gillick au sujet même de son travail, ici les intentions et les résultats ne sont pas faits pour coïncider. Disons que, paradoxalement, c’est plutôt l’image finale de l’exposition, ou une image générique de cet état final, qui a été le point de départ de cette réflection. Comme j’observais au fil des jours cette réflexion, j’ai cerné diverses questions qu’elle m’adressait, ou que, dans un mouvement constant de dribble, j’adressais aux oeuvres, aux expositions. » Eric Troncy (p.280) Œuvres de Bazile Bustamante, Robert Barry, Bernard Buffet, Angela Bulloch, Jake & Dinos Chapman, Stéphane Dafflon, Sylvie Fleury, Gloria Friedmann, Katharina Fritsch, Kendell Geers, Piero Gilardi, Liam Gillick, Robert Gober, Steven Gontarski, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Gucci, Mark Handforth, Jenny Holzer, Pierre Huyghe, Wendy Jacobs, IFP, On Kawara, Anselm Kiefer, Koo Jeong-A, Bertrand Lavier, Claude Lévêque, Sol LeWitt, Didier Marcel, Allan McCollum, M/M (Paris), Sarah Morris, Helmut Newton, Philippe Parreno, Pino Pascali, Richard Phillips, Ugo Rondinone, Thomas Ruff, Bruno Serralongue, Niele Toroni, Gavin Turk, Xavier Veilhan, Jean-Luc Verna, Andy Warhol, Lawrence Weiner, Franz West.

The contribution of Albert Renger-Patzsch (1897 -1966) to the avant-garde photography of the 1920s and early 1930s has established his leading role in the history of the medium. His most important publication Die Welt ist schön (The World is Beautiful), became one of the most influential photography books ever. August Sander’s achievements in portraiture and Karl Blossfeldt’s in plant photography are matched in Renger-Patzsch’s rendering of the material world. His photographs – cool, free from passion and almost clinical in their purity, showing details of technical apparatus, industrial products and natural organisms – are models of a new kind of vision, combining objectivity and order with beauty and technology.

“When Attitudes Become Form: Bern 1969/Venice 2013”, a cura di Germano Celant in dialogo con Thomas Demand e Rem Koolhaas ricostruisce, in un inedito e sorprendente rifacimento, “Live in Your Head. When Attitudes Become Form”, una mostra ideata e realizzata da Harald Szeemann alla Kunsthalle di Berna nel 1969 e passata alla storia per il radicale approccio del curatore alla pratica espositiva, concepita come medium linguistico. Riproporre oggi in modo letterale una mostra del 1969, mantenendo le originarie relazioni e connessioni visuali e formali tra le opere, ha posto una serie di interrogativi sulla problematicità e sul significato stesso di un progetto che si è sviluppato attraverso una profonda discussione sotto diverse prospettive: artistica, architettonica e curatoriale. Si è deciso di innestare la mostra – nella sua totalità di muri, pavimenti e relative installazioni e oggetti d’arte – nella storica struttura architettonica e negli ambienti di Ca’ Corner della Regina, arrivando a inserire in scala 1:1 le stanze moderne della Kunsthalle, delimitate da superfici parietali bianche, negli antichi saloni affrescati del palazzo veneziano. Si tratta di fatto di un esercizio di doppia occupazione: così come la Kunsthalle fu occupata da una giovane generazione di artisti rivoluzionari nel 1969, con lo stesso spirito le sale riccamente decorate di Ca’ Corner della Regina sono a loro volta invase dalle stanze novecentesche della Kunsthalle. Il risultato è una sovrapposizione tanto letterale quanto radicale di spazi, che genera relazioni nuove e inaspettate tra le opere stesse e tra le opere e lo spazio. L’intento di questa operazione è ridare vita al processo espositivo con cui “When Attitudes Become Form” venne realizzata, così da evitare la mediazione dei documenti fotografici e filmici, e poterlo esperire e analizzare “dal vero”, esattamente com’era, seppur trasportato dall’ieri all’oggi. “When Attitudes Become Form: Bern 1969/Venice 2013” riunirà – dopo un’approfondita ricerca, compiuta a stretto contatto con gli artisti, i loro eredi e le loro fondazioni, e in collaborazione con Glenn Phillips, curatore del Getty Research Institute di Los Angeles (GRI) che ospita l’archivio e la biblioteca di Harald Szeemann – le opere originali e presenti a Berna, quelle ritrovate e provenienti da importanti collezioni private e musei internazionali, Tra gli artisti presentati alla mostra figuravano, per citarne alcuni, Carl Andre, Giovanni Anselmo, Richard Artschwager, Joseph Beuys, Alighiero Boetti, Hanne Darboven, Walter De Maria, Jan Dibbets, Michael Heizer, Eva Hesse, Jannis Kounellis, Sol LeWitt, Richard Long, Mario Merz, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Claes Oldenburg, Robert Ryman, Sarkis, Richard Serra, Keith Sonnier, Lawrence Weiner e Gilberto Zorio.

Band 1: malerei, plastik, performance.- Band 2: fotografie film video.- Band 3: handzeichnungen, utopisches design, bücher.- Artsts: Berenice Abbott, Hermann Albert, Carl Andre, Ben d’Armagnac, Christian Ludwig Attersee, Vito Acconci, Pierre Alechinsky, Theo Angelopoulos, Arman (Armand Fernandez), Bernhard Aubertin, Valerio Adami, Gerhard Altenbourg, Ottomar Anschütz, Fernando Arrabal, Joannis Avramidis, Robert Adamson, Robert Altman, Horst Antes, Eduardo Arroyo, Alice Aycock, Peter Ackermann, Anatol, Ant Farm, Art & Language, Billy Adler, Gisela Andersch, Shusaku Arakawa, David Askevold, Chantal Akerman, Laurie Anderson, Diane Arbus, Eugène Atget, Francis Bacon, Monika Baumgartl, Joseph Beuys, Fernando Botero, Kevin Brownlow & Andrew Mollo, Michael Badura, Hippolyte Bayard, Michael von Biel, Margaret Bourke-White, Günter Brus, Eduard Denis Baldús, Thomas Bayrle, Werner Bischof, Mathew B. Brady, Anatol Brosilowsky, Balthus, Cecil Beaton, Louis-Auguste Bisson & Auguste-Rosalie Bisson, Brassaï (Gyula Halász), Wojciech Bruszewski, Joachim Bandau, Bernd e Hilla Becher, Irma Blanck, George Brecht, Luis Buñuel, Jared Bark, Stephan Beck, Karl Blossfeldt, KP Brehmer, Chris Burden, Robert Barry, Bill Beckley, Bernhard Blume, George Hendrik Breitner, Daniel Buren, Jennifer Bartlett, John Ernest Joseph Bellocq, Mel Bochner, Heinz Breloh, Scott Burton, Gianfranco Baruchello, Carmelo Bene, Peter Bogdanovich, Robert Bresson, Michael Buthe, Giorgio Batistella, Franz Bernhard, Claus Böhmler, Stuart Brisley, James Lee Byars, Gerd Baukhage, Jean-Marie Bertholin, Blythe Bohnen, Jürgen Brodwolf, Horst H. Baumann, Nuccio Bertone, Karl Bohrmann, Marcel Broodthaers, Bodo Baumgarten, Jean-Louis Bertucelli, Christian Boltanski, Stanley Brouwn, Enzo Cacciola, Robert Capa, Barbara Chase-Riboud, Pinchas Cohen-Gan, Michael Craig-Martin, Julia Margaret Cameron, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Eduardo Chillida, James Collins, Fritz Cremer, Colin Campell, Étienne Carjat, Christo, Miguel Condé, José Luis Cuevas, Peter Campus, Ugo Carrega, Chryssa, Tony Conrad, Edward Curtis, Louis Cane, Lewis Carroll, Chuck Close, Steven Cortright, Veassis Caniaris, Claude Chabrol, Harold Cohen, Claudio Costa, Miodrag Djuric (Dado), Douglas Davis, Walter De Maria, Jim Dine, Juan Downey, Louis Daguerre, Ger Dekkers, Agnes Denes, Henry + Bool Alfred + John Dixon, Peter Downsborough, Hanne Darboven, Willem de Kooning, Fred Deux, Dore O., Michael Druks, Alan Davie, Philip Henry Delamotte, Jan Dibbets, Ugo Dossi, Marcel Duchamp, John Davies, Jack Delano, Braco Dimitrijevic, Christian Dotremont, David Douglas Duncan, Don Eddy, Paul Eliasberg, Heinz Emigholz, Ulrich Erben, Walker Evans, Benni Efrat, Ger van Elk, Ed Emshwiller, Hugo Erfurth, Valie Export, Sergej Eisenstein, Peter Henry Emerson, Leo Erb, Garth Evans, Öyvind Fahlström, Federico Fellini, Dan Flavin, Charles Frazier, Lee Friedlander, Herbert Falken, Roger Fenton, Richard Fleischer, Hermine Freed, Hamish Fulton, Ralston Farina, Armand Fernandez, Lucio Fontana, Will Frenken, Heidi Fasnacht, Vincenzo Ferrari, Fred Forest, Achim Freyer, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Robert Filliou, Terry Fox, Gisèle Freund, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Wolfgang Gäfgen, Jochen Gerz, Tina Girouard, Dan Graham, Nancy Graves, Abel Gance, Paul-Armand Gette, Michael Gitlin, Eve Gramatzki, Alan Green, Alexander Gardner, Peter Gidal, Wilhelm von Gloeden, Tom J. Gramse, Marty Greenbaum, Winfred Gaul, Wolfram Giersbach, Jean-Luc Godard, Gotthard Graubner, Alberto Grifi, Rupprecht Geiger, Gilbert & George, Hubertus Gojowczyk, Nancy Graves, Robert Grosvenor, Michael Geissler, Frank Gilette, Kuno Gonschior, Walter Grasskamp, Hetum Gruber, Arnold Genthe, Raimund Girke, Camille Graeser, Gotthard Graubner, Renato Guttuso, Roel D’Haese, Haus-Rucker-Co, Wilhelm Hein, Lewis Hine, Nan Hoover, Helfried Hagenberg, Erich Hauser, Bernhard Heisig, Leon Hirszman, Rebecca Horn, David Hall, Lady Hawarden, Michael Heizer, Antonius Höckelmann, Horst P. Horst, Nigel Hall, Ron Hays, Al Held, David Hockney, George Hoyningen-Huene, Phillipe Halsman, Tim Head, Werner Herzog, Anatol Herzfeld, Alfred Hofkunst, Richard Hamilton, Erwin Heerich, Eva Hesse, Rudolf Hoflehner, Douglas Huebler, Heijo Hangen, Axel Heibel, David Octavius Hill, Edgar Hofschen, Danièle Huillet, Noriyuki Haraguchi, Birgit Hein, John Hilliard, Hans Hollein, Alfonso Hüppi, Karl Horst Hödicke, Shohei Imamura, Will Insley, Jean Ipoustéguy, Patrick Ireland, Hans Paul Isenrath, Ken Jacobs, Paul Jaray, Jasper Johns, Francis Benjamin Johnston, Miklós Jancsó, Jo Jastram, J. Douglas Johnson, Donald Judd, Horst Janssen, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Joan Jonas, Martha Jungwirth, Wolf Kahlen, Buster Keaton, Jürgen Klauke, Beril Korot, Ferdinand Kriwet, Max Kaminski, Ellsworth Kelly, Alexander Kluge, Joseph Kosuth, Germaine Krull, Howard Kanovitz, Michael Kenny, Werner Knaupp, Jannis Kounellis, Shigeko Kubota, Tadeusz Kantor, André Kertész, Günther Knipp, Andras Kovács, Stanley Kubrick, Allan Kaprow, Anselm Kiefer, Milan Knížák, Attila Kovács, Gary Kuehn, Dani Karavan, Harry Kipper, Imi Knoebel, Kurt Kren, Marin Karmitz, Alain Kirili, Alice Kochs, Dieter Krieg, Gertrude Kasebier, Ronald B. Kitaj, Christof Kohlhöfer, Richard Kriesche, On Kawara, Konrad Klapheck, Jiří Kolář, Les Krims, Willem de Kooning, László Lakner, Barry Le Va, Michael Leisgen, Lawrence Lobe, Urs Lüthi, Arthur Lamothe, Russell Lee, Les Levine, Francisco Lopez, Georg Platt Lynes, Richard Landry, Jean Le Gac, Sol LeWitt, Antonio Lopez-Garcia, Nikolaus Lang, Gustave Le Gray, Roy Lichtenstein, Joseph Losey, Dorothea Lange, Malcolm Le Grice, Richard Lindner, Bernhard Luginbühl, John Latham, Barbara Leisgen, Michael Lingner, Bernhard Lüthi, Heinz Mack, Kenneth Martin, Gerhard Merz, Alexander Mitta, Robert Morris, Nino Malfatti, Charles Marville, Mario Merz, Milan Mölzer, Alfons Maria Mucha, Felix H. Man (Hans Baumann), Roberto Matta, Borg Mesch, Bernard Moninot, Ugo Mulas, Robert Mangold, Gordon Matta-Clark, Anette Messager, Henry Moore, Antoni Muntadas, Andy Mann, Wolfgang Mattheuer, Adolphe de Meyer, Stefan Moore, Walter Murch, Werner Mantz, Cynthia Lee Maughan, Duane Michals, Carmengloria Morales, J.-J. Murphy, Piero Manzoni, Antony McCall, Henri Michaux, Marcello Morandini, Zoran Mušič, Giacomo Manzù, Barry McCallion, Rune Mields, Pit Morell, Eadweard Muybridge, Robert Mapplethorpe, Bruce McLean, Antoni Miralda, François Morellet, Brice Marden, Syd Mead, Josef Mikl, Maria Moreno, Agnes Martin, Dariush Mehrjui, Joan Miró, Malcolm Morley, Tomitaro Nachi, Bruce Nauman, Wolfgang Nestler, Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, Maria Nordman, Félix Nadar, Charles Nègre, Richard Newton, Ansgar Nierhoff, Gabriele & Helmut Nothhelfer, Maurizio Nannucci, Werner Nekes, Max Neuhaus, Richard Nonas, Lev V. Nussberg, Dore O., Timothy O’Sullivan, Roman Opalka, Nagisa Oshima, Oswald Oberhuber, Claes Oldenburg, Dennis Oppenheim, Jean Otth, Brian O’Doherty, Claudio Olivieri, Anna Oppermann, Hilmar Pabel, Giulio Paolini, A. R. Penck, Pablo Picasso, Lucio Pozzi, Nam June Paik, Eduardo Paolozzi, Peng-Wan-Ts, Otto Piene, Heinz-Günter Prager, Blinky Palermo, Gordon Parks, Beverly Pepper, Walter Pichler, Mario Prassinos, Magnus Palsson, Sergei Paradschanow, Elio Petri, Anne & Patrick Poirier, Panamarenko, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Wolfgang Petrick, Sigmar Polke, Gina Pane, Max Peintner, Friederike Pezold, Don Potts, Isabel Quintanilla, Daniel Quintero, William Raban, John Reilly, Jacob August Riis, Peter Roehr, Ed Ruscha, David Rabinowitch, James Reineking, Bridget Riley, Ulrike Rosenbach, Ken Russell, Arnulf Rainer, Albert Renger-Patzsch, Klaus Rinke, James Rosenquist, Claude Rutault, Yvonne Rainer, Jean Renoir, Larry Rivers, Francesco Rosi, Reiner Ruthenbeck, Robert Rauschenberg, Alain Resnais, Jacques Rivette, Roberto Rossellini, Robert Ryman, Man Ray, Erich Reusch, Józef Robakowski, Dieter Roth, Éric Rohmer, Tony Ray-Jones, Hans Peter Reuter, Dorothea Rockburne, Arthur Rothstein, Martial Raysse, George Warren Rickey, Alexander Rodtschenko, Gerhard Rühm, Reindeer Werk, Hans Salentin, Tomas Schmit, Eugen Schönebeck, Michael Singer, Edward Steichen, Sohrab Shadid Saless, Wolfgang Schmitz, Martin Schwarz (Künstler), Willi Sitte, Saul Steinberg, Erich Salomon, Helmut Schober, Martin Scorsese, Neal Slavin, Frank Stella, Lucas Samaras, Eugen Schönebeck, George Segal, David Smith, Alfred Stieglitz, Fred Sandback, Ben Schonzeit, Antonio Seguí, Robert Smithson, Sir Benjamin Stone, August Sander, Rudolf Schoofs, Friedrich Seidenstücker, Fernando Ezequiel Solanas, Paul Strand, Sarkis Zabunyan, Jan Schoonhoven, Richard Serra, Michael Snow, Jean-Marie Straub, Antonio Saura, Werner Schroeter, Ben Shahn, Alan Sonfist, Liselotte Strelow, Konrad Balder Schäuffelen, Heinz Schubert, Joel Shapiro, Eve Sonneman, Michell Stuart, Georgij Schengalaja, Alf Schuler, Charles Sheeler, Keith Sonnier, Josef Sudek, Alexander Schleber, HA Schult, Stephen Shore, Daniel Spoerri, István Szábo, Barbara Schmidt-Heins, Bernard Schultze, Katharina Sieverding, Klaus Staeck, Gabriele Schmidt-Heins, Emil Schumacher, Charles Simonds, Ted Stamm, Jiro Takamatsu, Andrej Tarkowskij, George Trakas, Peter Tuma, Vassilakis Takis, André Thomkins, François Truffaut, Deborah Turbeville, William Henry Fox Talbot, Jean Tinguely, Costas Tsoclis, Richard Tuttle, Antoni Tàpies, Gérard Titus-Carmel, Werner Tübke, Cy Twombly,Günther Uecker, Lee U Fan, Timm Ulrichs, Ursula Schultze-Bluhm, Giuliano Vangi, Wladimir Veličkovič, Bill Viola, Klaus Vogelsang, Hannsjörg Voth, Agnès Varda, Bernard Venet, Luchino Visconti, Wolf Vostell, Andrzej Wajda, Weegee, Orson Welles, Gottfried Wiegand, Claus Peter Wittig, Willie Walker, William Wegman, Wim Wenders, Klaus Wildenhahn, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Franz Erhard Walther, Peter Weibel, Lina Wertmüller, Dorothee von Windheim, Erwin Wortelkamp, Andy Warhol, Lawrence Weiner, Dsiga Wertow, Gerd Winner, Fritz Wotruba, Ryszard Wasko, Roger Welch, Marthe Wéry, Reindert Wepko van de Wint, Klaus Wyborny, Wolfgang Weber, Peter Weller, Tom Wesselmann, Rainer Wittenborn, Keigo Yamamoto, Yves Yerson, Yoshio Yoshida, Frank Young, Herbert Zangs, Gianfranco Zappettini, Jerry Zeniuk, Heinrich Zille, Krzysztof Zanussi, Michele Zaza, Christian Ziewer, Zush

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