Mona Hatoum is an internationally renowned Lebanese-born, British-based Palestinian artist whose work is both deeply personal and quietly political. Inspired by her familial connections to war-torn Beirut as well as her sensitivity to contemporary racial and gender-based injustice, she transgresses the boundaries of performance, video, and sculpture while strategically reworking minimalism from a vantage point grounded in a feminist and cross-cultural sensibility.

Taking its title from Harald Szeemanns landmark show, Live in Your Head re-examines the artistic legacy of the 1960s and 70s and attempts to clarify the points of origin of a formative generation in British art. An essential guide to the period, being the first since the 1970s to focus specifically on conceptual and experimental art in Britain. Featuring a double-page spread on each of the 64 participating artists, this catalogue also includes artists statements and portraits, reproductions of numerous works, biographic and bibliographical information. In addition, Live in Your Head includes a lively and illustrated chronology of social and cultural events between 1965-1975, and essays by Michael Archer, Rosetta Brooks and co-curators, Andrea Tarsia and Clive Phillpot.

A ghost town in Cyprus as a metaphor for an aesthetic and political reconstruction in the margins of Europe: an artistic approach to contemporary issues related to a real situation, with about 30 international artists and contributions by writers from different fields (philosophy, anthropology, history, politics, and sociology). Contemporary political Europe is built on a principle involving the disappearance of physical borders. The Schengen area is gradually seeing the boundaries between European Union member states vanish, thus symbolically erasing what lay, twice over, at the root of the 20th century’s two world wars. In specific cases, however, and with distinct violence, border areas, buffer zones and “suspended spaces” are all unsettling Europe’s geography, like so many points of tension. The town of Famagusta in Cyprus is one such point. As a partly closed town, emptied of its inhabitants, occupied by the turkish army and also guarded by UN forces since 1974, the year that saw the end of the armed conflict between Greece and Turkey, Famagusta becomes the metaphor of an aesthetic and political construct in the book Suspended spaces. The Suspended spaces project is a collective experiment involving an intellectual and visual displacement. It is played out in several phases. A team of international researchers proposes a residency in Cyprus. In it, thinkers, writers and artists square off against one another in Famagusta, a town partly forgotten by the rest of Europe, and whose political status is in the balance. An exhibition in Amiens comes about as a result of this encounter “with the terrain”. Then, in a third phase that encompasses the first two, this book is produced. In it, visual, plastic and written propositions intermingle. Artists and authors fill the book’s pages with original ideas (portfolios, essays, discussions). Without any emphasis on consensus, Suspended spaces-Famagusta expresses the eclectic viewpoints in relation to a complex historical and political reality on the inner sidelines of Europe. Reading between the lines, the book also questions the conditions behind present-day art productions, thinking, and activities. Without borrowing a research method, in the strict sense of the term, Suspended spaces proposes a modus operandi which adapts and redefines itself based on the territory it focuses on. So the project has a migratory brief, and Suspended spaces-Famagusta is its first chapter. Published on the occasion of the eponymous exhibition at maison de la Culture d’Amiens, france, from January to April, 2011. Works by Berger&Berger, Pravdoliub Ivanov, Marcel Dinahet, Lia Lapithi ,Christian Barani, Christophe Viart, Köken Ergun, Adrian Paci, Jan Kopp, Filip Berte, Armin Linke, Serap Kanay and Aristide Antonas, Ziad Antar, Antoine Boutet, François Bellenger, Mira Sanders, Yiannis Toumazis, Sophie Ristelhueber, Elizabeth Hoak Doering, Michael Panayotis, Nikos Charalambidis, Eric Valette, Daniel Lê, Katerina Attalides, Maider Fortuné, Yannis Kyriakides, Stefanos Tsivopoulos, Françoise Parfait, Denis Pondruel.

Utopianism is not dead; it has migrated from politics to materialism. This book, says Canadian industrial designer Mau (who founded Toronto City College’s Institute Without Borders), is “not about the world of design; it’s about the design of the world.” In a form that is part Apple ad, part Powerpoint presentation and part architectural pastiche à la Rem Koolhaus, Mau’s volume brings together designs and theories (mostly Western) and photographers (global) that “tap into global commons,” “distribute capacity” and “embrace paradox”: superstrong fibers modeled on gecko hairs; “sustainable business” that embraces corporate accountability; the “redesigning” of Third World property law; genetic engineering, macro- and microimaging technologies; virtual reality technology that allows collaboration over large distances; a “cyberneticized” military that paradoxically has more nonviolent options. All of these ideas (some of which are now reality) are here in words and pictures, often further explained through q&a’s with leading researchers. The result reads, intentionally, like a friendly corporate prospectus or catalogue, except that the “product” on offer is a radically hopeful vision of the future. With 250 color and 50 b&w photos in a fractally chaotic layout, and a text that speaks in affirmative sound bites, this book offers a vision of the world in a package designed to get readers excited about stoves that burn peanut shells, superlight gels that can protect flowers from flame, and plants and microbes that turn open sewers into water supplies. It succeeds beautifully. Includes transcripts of interviews with: Philip Ball, Janine Benyus, Stewart Brand, Stephen Browne, Carol Burns, James Der Derian, Bill Drayton, Gwynne Dyer, Freeman Dyson, Ian Foster, Felice Frankel, Robert Freling, Ashok Gadgil, Catherine Gray, Hazel Henderson, Dean Kamen, Arthur Kroker, Robert S. Langer, Jaime Lerner, Lawrence Lessig, David Malin, Michael McDonough, William McDonough, Seymour Melman, Nancy Padian, Matt Ridley, Jeffrey Sachs, Richard Smalley, Hernando de Soto, Bruce Sterling and Eugene Thacker.

A personal encounter with 50 of the world’s most significant contemporary artists, “pressPlay” draws together the full texts of the complete Phaidon interviews with living artists, 1995-2005, originally appearing in “Phaidon’s Contemporary Artists” series and “Robert Mangold” monograph. Highlights include veteran painter Vija Celmins and noted sculptor Robert Gober (who represented the US at the 2001 Venice Biennale) in an intimate discussion on their differing art practices; longtime friends and fellow travellers for decades, Benjamin Buchloh and Lawrence Weiner recall 35 years of work, in the definitive, career-long interview for this key Conceptual artist; the late Sir Ernst Gombrich honoured the “Contemporary Artists” series in a discussion with the UK’s pre-eminent sculptor Antony Gormley – who confesses that it was Gombrich’ “Story of Art” that first inspired him to become an artist; the taciturn, legendary Raymond Pettibon muses on the evolution of his work with noted hip novelist Dennis Cooper; musician artist Christian Marclay is interviewed by Sonic Youth rockstar Kim Gordon. From highly established artists Louise Bourgeois and Alex Katz, to midcareer masters Richard Prince, Mike Kelley, Fischli and Weiss, Jenny Holzer, and Raymond Pettibon, to the most exciting artists of the current generation, including Maurizio Cattelan, Olafur Eliasson and Pipilotti Rist, pressPlay is a highly readable, comprehensive look at contemporary art today. Vito Acconci/Mark C Taylor; Doug Aitken/Amanda Sharp; Uta Barth/Matthew Higgs; Christian Boltanski/Tamar Garb; Louise Bourgeois/Paulo Herkenhoff; Cai Guo Qiang/Octavio Zaya; Maurizio Cattelan/Nancy Spector; Vija Celmins/Robert Gober; Richard Deacon/Pier Luigi Tazzi; Mark Dion/Miwon Kwon; Stan Douglas/Diana Thater; Marlene Dumas/Barbara Bloom; Jimmie Durham/Dirk Snauwaert; Olafur Eliasson/Daniel Birnbaum; Peter Fischli and David Weiss/Beate Soentgen; Tom Friedman/Dennis Cooper; Isa Genzken/Diedrich Diederichsen; Antony Gormley/Sir Ernst Gombrich; Dan Graham/Mark Francis; Paul Graham/Gillian Wearing; Hans Haacke/Molly Nesbit; Mona Hatoum/Michael Archer; Thomas Hirschhorn/Alison M Gingeras; Jenny Holzer/Joan Simon; Roni Horn/Lynne Cooke; Ilya Kabakov/David A Ross; Alex Katz/Robert Storr; Mary Kelly/Douglas Crimp; Mike Kelley/Isabelle Graw; William Kentridge/Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev; Yayoi Kusama/Akira Tatehata; Robert Mangold/Sylvia Plimack Mangold; Christian Marclay/Kim Gordon; Paul McCarthy/Kristine Stiles; Cildo Meireles/Gerardo Mosquera; Lucy Orta/Roberto Pinto; Raymond Pettibon/Dennis Cooper; Richard Prince/Jeff Rian; Pipilotti Rist/Hans Ulrich Obrist; Doris Salcedo/Carlos Basualdo; Thomas Schutte/James Lingwood; Lorna Simpson/Thelma Golden; Nancy Spero/Jo Anna Isaak; Jessica Stockholder/Lynne Tillman; Wolfgang Tillmans/Peter Halley; Luc Tuymans/Juan Vicente Aliaga; Jeff Wall/Arielle Pelenc; Gillian Wearing/Donna De Salvo; Lawrence Weiner/Benjamin H D Buchloh; Franz West/Bice Curiger.

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