Manifestos by artists, authors, editors, publishers, designers, zinesters explore publishing as artistic practice. Contributors AND Publishing, Oswald de Andrade, Archive Books, Art-Rite, Rasheed Araeen, Tauba Auerbach, Michael Baers, Bibi Bakare-Yusuf, Ricardo Basbaum, Derek Beaulieu, Bernadette Corporation, Riccardo Boglione, Bombay Underground, Jorge Luis Borges, bpNichol, Kate Briggs, Broken Dimanche Press, Eleanor Vonne Brown, Urvashi Butalia, Ulises Carrión, Mariana Castillo Deball, Paul Chan, Chimurenga, Arpita Das, Anita Di Bianco, Guy Debord, Constant Dullaart, Craig Dworkin, Ntone Edjabe, Zenon Fajfer, Marina Fokidis, General Idea, Annette Gilbert, Girls Like Us, Gloria Glitzer, Marianne Groulez, Alex Hamburger, Karl Holmqvist, Lisa Holzer, Mahmood Jamal, Tom Jennings, Ray Johnson, David Jourdan, Sharon Kivland, Kione Kochi, Kwani?, Bruce LaBruce, Tan Lin, El Lissitzky, Alessandro Ludovico, Sara MacKillop, Steve McCaffery, Jonathan Monk, Simon Morris, Mosireen, León Munoz Santini, Takashi Murakami, Deke Nihilson, Aurélie Noury, Johnny Noxzema, Clive Phillpot, Michalis Pichler, Seth Price, Riot Grrrl, Carlos Soto Román, Allen Ruppersberg, Joachim Schmid, Oliver Sieber, Paul Soulellis, Matthew Stadler, Gertrude Stein, Paul Stephens, Hito Steyerl, Mladen Stilinović, Katja Stuke, Temporary Services, Nick Thurston, TIQQUN, Elisabeth Tonnard, V. Vale, Eric Watier, Erik van der Weijde, Lawrence Weiner, Eva Weinmayr, Jan Wenzel, Stephen Willats, Gil J Wolman, zubaan Independent publishing, art publishing, publishing as artistic practice, publishing counterculture, and the zine, DIY, and POD scenes have proliferated over the last two decades. So too have art book fairs, an increasingly important venue—or even medium—for art. Art publishing experienced a similar boom in the 1960s and 1970s, in response to the culture’s “linguistic turn.” Today, art publishing confronts the internet and the avalanche of language and images that it enables. The printed book offers artists both visibility and tangibility. Publishing Manifestos gathers texts by artists, authors, editors, publishers, designers, zinesters, and activists to explore this rapidly expanding terrain for art practice. The book begins in the last century, with texts by Gertrude Stein, El Lissitsky, Oswald de Andrade, and Jorge-Luis Borges. But the bulk of the contributions are from the twenty-first century, with an emphasis on diversity, including contributions from Tauba Auerbach, Mariana Castillo Deball, Ntone Edjabe, Girls Like Us, Karl Holmqvist, Temporary Services, and zubaan. Some contributors take on new forms of production and distribution; others examine the political potential of publishing and the power of collectivity inherent in bookmaking. They explore among other topics, artists’ books, appropriation, conceptual writing, non-Western communities, queer identities, and post-digital publishing. Many texts are reproduced in facsimile—including a handwritten “speculative, future-forward newspaper” from South Africa. Some are proclamatory mission statements, others are polemical self-positioning; some are playful, others explicitly push the boundaries. All help lay the conceptual foundations of a growing field of practice and theory.

Exhibition catalogue published in conjunction with show held September 10 – October 19, 1969. Text by Samuel J. Wagstaff, Jr. Artists include Cecil Abish, Peter Alexander, Carl Andre, Jo Baer, Lynda Benglis, Bill Bollinger, Robert H. Cumming, Susan Deming, Royce Dendler, Jean Dupuy, William Dutterer, George Ettl, Dan Flavin, Sam Gilliam, Hans Haacke, Michael Heizer, Robert Huot, Sheldon Iden, Neil Jenney, Shlomo Koren, Aris Koutroulis, Robert Lobe, Edward McGown, Nam June Paik, David Prentice, Fred Sandback, Charles Santon, Thomas Shannon, Robert Stalkhouse, James Storey, Richard Tuttle and William Wegman. Includes biography and exhibition history for each artists. Catalogue designed by Bill Butts, has a cardboard cover, without stamps.

Manifestos by artists, authors, editors, publishers, designers, zinesters explore publishing as artistic practice.

Independent publishing, art publishing, publishing as artistic practice, publishing counterculture, and the zine, DIY, and POD scenes have proliferated over the last two decades. So too have art book fairs, an increasingly important venue―or even medium―for art. Art publishing experienced a similar boom in the 1960s and 1970s, in response to the culture’s “linguistic turn.” Today, art publishing confronts the internet and the avalanche of language and images that it enables. The printed book offers artists both visibility and tangibility. Publishing Manifestos gathers texts by artists, authors, editors, publishers, designers, zinesters, and activists to explore this rapidly expanding terrain for art practice.

The book begins in the last century, with texts by Gertrude Stein, El Lissitsky, Oswald de Andrade, and Jorge-Luis Borges. But the bulk of the contributions are from the twenty-first century, with an emphasis on diversity, including contributions from Tauba Auerbach, Mariana Castillo Deball, Ntone Edjabe, Girls Like Us, Karl Holmqvist, Temporary Services, and zubaan. Some contributors take on new forms of production and distribution; others examine the political potential of publishing and the power of collectivity inherent in bookmaking. They explore among other topics, artists’ books, appropriation, conceptual writing, non-Western communities, queer identities, and post-digital publishing. Many texts are reproduced in facsimile―including a handwritten “speculative, future-forward newspaper” from South Africa. Some are proclamatory mission statements, others are polemical self-positioning; some are playful, others explicitly push the boundaries. All help lay the conceptual foundations of a growing field of practice and theory.

Contributors
AND Publishing, Oswald de Andrade, Archive Books, Art-Rite, Rasheed Araeen, Tauba Auerbach, Michael Baers, Bibi Bakare-Yusuf, Ricardo Basbaum, Derek Beaulieu, Bernadette Corporation, Riccardo Boglione, Bombay Underground, Jorge Luis Borges, bpNichol, Kate Briggs, Broken Dimanche Press, Eleanor Vonne Brown, Urvashi Butalia, Ulises Carrión, Mariana Castillo Deball, Paul Chan, Chimurenga, Arpita Das, Anita Di Bianco, Guy Debord, Constant Dullaart, Craig Dworkin, Ntone Edjabe, Zenon Fajfer, Marina Fokidis, General Idea, Annette Gilbert, Girls Like Us, Gloria Glitzer, Marianne Groulez, Alex Hamburger, Karl Holmqvist, Lisa Holzer, Mahmood Jamal, Tom Jennings, Ray Johnson, David Jourdan, Sharon Kivland, Kione Kochi, Kwani?, Bruce LaBruce, Tan Lin, El Lissitzky, Alessandro Ludovico, Sara MacKillop, Steve McCaffery, Jonathan Monk, Simon Morris, Mosireen, León Munoz Santini, Takashi Murakami, Deke Nihilson, Aurélie Noury, Johnny Noxzema, Clive Phillpot, Michalis Pichler, Seth Price, Riot Grrrl, Carlos Soto Román, Allen Ruppersberg, Joachim Schmid, Oliver Sieber, Paul Soulellis, Matthew Stadler, Gertrude Stein, Paul Stephens, Hito Steyerl, Mladen Stilinovic, Katja Stuke, Temporary Services, Nick Thurston, TIQQUN, Elisabeth Tonnard, V. Vale, Eric Watier, Erik van der Weijde, Lawrence Weiner, Eva Weinmayr, Jan Wenzel, Stephen Willats, Gil J Wolman, zubaan

Copublished with Miss Read: The Berlin Art Book Fair

45 graphic designers, 90 photographs, 10 years of books on contemporary art. This book is based on an invitation to graphic designers to choose two books on contemporary art from the past decade whose design they think is particularly pertinent to the content, to photograph one double-page spread from each book and, if they wish, to comment on their choices. Double Page provides a selection of recent art publications as viewed by graphic designers who are internationally known for their contribution to that field, and offers a glimpse at the role of book design today in our knowledge and understanding of contemporary art. Shedding light on this prevalent relationship between art and graphic design by means of photography, Double Page constitutes an unprecedented document of how graphic designers see the work of their peers and their own practices as an essential part of the editorial process. Contributors: Philipp Arnold, Stuart Bailey, Ludovic Balland (Typography Cabinet), Jean-Marc Ballée, Peter Bilak (Typotheque), Julia Born, Change is Good (José Albergaria & Rik Bas Backer), Jocelyn Cottencin (Lieuxcommuns), Jean-Marie Courant (Regular), Sara De Bondt, Linda van Deursen & Armand Mevis (Mevis & van Deursen), deValence (Alexandre Dimos & Gaël Étienne), Markus Dreßen (Spector), Daniel Eatock, Gavillet & Rust (Gilles Gavillet, David Rust), Christian Haas (Raffinerie AG für Gestaltung), Will Holder, Simon Josebury (Secondary Modern), Erik Kessels (KesselsKramer), Kummer & Herrman (Arthur Herrman, Jeroen Kummer), Aude Lehmann, Lehni-Trueb (Urs Lehni and Lex Trueb), Joseph Logan, Jonathan Maghen (Textfield), Mike Meiré, Maureen Mooren, Stephan Müller (Müller & Wesse), NORM (Dimitri Bruni & Manuel Krebs), Warren Olds (Studio Ahoy), Tania Prill, Alberto Vieceli (Prill & Vieceli), Purtill Family Business, Yvonne Quirmbach, Manuel Raeder, David Reinfurt (Dexter Sinister, O-R-G), Alex Rich, Georg Rutishauser, Benjamin Sommerhalder (Nieves), Christoph Steinegger (Interkool), Jon Sueda & Gail Swanlund (Stripe) Frédéric Teschner, Alexia de Visscher & Pierre Huyguebaert (Speculoos, SPRL), Markus Weisbeck, Dorothea Weishaupt (groenlandbasel), Roger Willems (Roma), Michael Worthington (Counterspace). Edited by Christophe Keller, Jérôme Saint-Loubert Bié, Catherine de Smet Graphic Design: Caroline Fabès & Joséphine Guérin with Jérôme Saint-Loubert Bié. Copublished with École régionale des Beaux-Arts de Rennes

With contributions by Agency, Irene Albers, Oksana Bulgakowa, Edwin Carels, Bart De Baere, Didier Demorcy, Brigid Doherty, Sergei Eisenstein, Anselm Franke, Masato Fukushima, Avery F. Gordon, Richard William Hill, Darius James, Gertrud Koch, Joachim Koester, Bruno Latour, Maurizio Lazzarato and Angela Melitopoulos, Vivian Liska, Henri Michaux, Santu Mofokeng, Philippe Pirotte, Florian Schneider, Erhard Schüttpelz, Michael Taussig, Eduardo Viveiros de Castro, Martin Zillinger What is the role of aesthetic processes in the drawing of the boundaries between nature and culture, humans and things, the animate and inanimate? Structured around the aesthetic processes and effects of animation and mummification, Animism—a companion publication to the long-term exhibition of the same title, which premiered at Extra City Kunsthal Antwerpen in January 2010—brings together artistic and theoretical perspectives that reflect on the boundary between subjects and objects, and the modern anxiety that accompanies the relation between “persons” and “things.” With works by Agency, Art & Language, Christian W. Braune & Otto Fischer, Marcel Broodthaers, Paul Chan, Tony Conrad, Didier Demorcy, Walt Disney, Lili Dujourie, Jimmie Durham, Eric Duvivier, Harun Farocki, León Ferrari, Christopher Glembotzky, Victor Grippo, Brion Gysin, Luis Jacob, Ken Jacobs, Darius James, Joachim Koester, Zacharias Kunuk, Louise Lawler, Len Lye, Étienne-Jules Marey, Daria Martin, Angela Melitopoulos & Maurizio Lazzarato, Wesley Meuris, Henri Michaux, Santu Mofokeng, Vincent Monnikendam, Tom Nicholson, Otobong Nkanga, Reto Pulfer, Félix-Louis Regnault, Józef Robakowski, Natascha Sadr Haghighian, Paul Sharits, Yutaka Sone, Jan Švankmajer, David G. Tretiakoff, Rosemarie Trockel, Anne-Mie Van Kerckhoven, Dziga Vertov, Klaus Weber, Apichatpong Weerasethakul

As a new movement that arose in the 1950s and 1960s, Minimalism challenged traditional ideas about art-making and the art object. A Minimal Future? Art As Object 1958-1968, which accompanies a major exhibition at The Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, offers a redefinition of Minimalism by situating it in the context of the concurrent aesthetics of modernist abstraction, pop art, and nascent ideas of conceptual art. Minimalism is presented as a range of strategies that propelled new definitions of the structure, form, material, image, and production of the art object and renegotiated its relationship to space and to the spectator.Focusing on the years 1958-1968, A Minimal Future? presents key works within the framework of a scholarly re-examination of minimal art’s emergence and historical context. It reflects the early transitional period that begins in the late 1950s, through the so-called “canonization” of Minimalism by 1968, with an emphasis on work produced in the mid-to-late 1960s.The book includes works from the late 1950s through the late 1960s by 40 artists, including Carl Andre, Richard Artschwager, Jo Baer, Larry Bell, Mel Bochner, Judy Chicago, Dan Flavin, Robert Grosvenor, Eva Hesse, Donald Judd, Sol LeWitt, Agnes Martin, John McCracken, Robert Ryman, Frank Stella, Anne Truitt, and Lawrence Weiner that reflect the shifting object status of painting and sculpture. The text features original essays by prominent art historians and scholars. Diedrich Diedrichsen addresses the relationship between minimal art and music; Jonathan Flatley focuses on Donald Judd and Andy Warhol; Timothy Martin considers perfomance in relation to minimal art; James Meyer examines East and West Coast practices of Minimalism; and Anne Rorimer discusses the relationship of minimal to conceptual art. Exhibition curator Ann Goldstein contributes an introduction. Also included are individual entries on each of the artists, an extensive bibliography, and an exhibition chronology.

The exhibition deutschemalereizweitausenddrei (german painting two thousand and three) is a response to the needs and social circumstances that have given rise to painting’s present (return to) popularity, and to the strategies young artists are developing to meet this. The focus is on individual approaches that seem symptomatic at present insofar as they strive to occupy up-to-date positions, adopting diverse strategies to integrate painting’s historical potential for critique and reflection. With a cover design by artist Liam Gillick, a text by Ingo Niermann and numerous color reproductions, the catalogue documents over fifty current positions of predominantly younger German, or in Germany living, artists. Included are works by Tomma Abts, Kai Althoff, Monika Baer, Dirk Bell, Thomas Eggerer, Christian Flamm, Katharina Grosse, Eberhard Havekost, Sergej Jensen, Johannes Kahrs, Jutta Koether, Hendrik Krawen, Antje Majewski, Jonathan Meese, Stefan Müller, Frank Nitsche, Silke Otto-Knapp, Anselm Reyle, Thomas Scheibitz, Johannes Wohnseifer, Katharina Wulff, Amelie von Wulffen, et al.

For Body of Painting, Gnter Umberg has placed his own oeuvre within the context of images by other artists with whom he feels a special affinity. The other artists featured include Jasper Johns, Sigmar Polke, Ellsworth Kelly, Yves Klein, Jessica Stockholder, Gerhard Richter, Brice Marden, Robert Ryman, Piero Manzoni, Andy Warhol, Jo Baer, Ingrid Calame, Helmut Federle, Dan Flavin, Sam Francis, Hans Hoffman, Oskar Kokoschka, Jonathan Lasker, and David Reed, among others. Together, these works create a discursive dialogue which allows viewers to grasp relationships of both harmony and discord among a multiplicitous network of texts, with surprising and engaging results. Umberg’s own pieces can definitely be counted among the many highlights of this collection–his paintings break the bounds of the visible; they form imaginary fields of extreme openness whose velvety blackness both envelops and releases the viewer.

“L.A. Rising: SoCal Artists Before 1980” is the first comprehensive pictorial showcase of the diverse universe of artists working in the Los Angeles area during the formative period of Los Angeles’ art history. Over 800 color and 100 black and white images of work by almost 500 artists illustrate the edited texts quoted from critical reviews of exhibitions and writings of the period. Special efforts have been made to include both recognized and heretofore unsung key players in the Los Angeles art world. The book acknowledges the legacy of a full range of artists whose lives and work in Los Angeles enabled the city to become the international contemporary art capital it is today.

Contributors: Lyn Kienholz, Elizabeta Betinski, Corinne Nelson, Clinton Adams, Ron Adams, Bas Jan Ader, John Alberty, Lita Albuquerque, Anders Aldrin, Peter Alexander, Martha Alf, Neda Al-Hilali, Carlos Almaraz, John Altoon, Mabel Alvarez, Arthur Ames, Jean Goodwin Ames, Laura Anderson, Oliver Andrews, Eleanor Antin, Craig Antrim, Chuck Arnoldi, Michael Asher, David Askevold, Walter Askin, Ralph Bacerra, Don Bachardy, Jo Baer, Herman Kofi Bailey, George P. Baker, Michael Balog, John Baldessari, Jack Barth, Richmond Barthé, Joel Bass, Lynn Bassler, Robert C. Bassler, Wall Batterton, Herbert Bayer, Phoebe Beasley, Larry Bell, Billy Al Bengston, Karl Benjamin, Ed Bereal, Pat Berger, Tony Berlant, Ben Berlin, Eugene Berman, Wallace Berman, John Bernhardt, Gary Beydler, Edward Biberman, Natalie Bieser, Les Biller, Annette Bird, Streeter Blair, Sandy Bleifer, Bob and Bob, Gloria Cole Bohanen, Douglas Bond, Dorr Bothwell, David Bradford, Rex Brandt, Jerry Brane, Bettina Brendel, Michael Brewster, William Brice, Nicholas Brigante, Morris Broderson, William Theophilus Brown, Nancy Buchanan, Conrad Buff II, David Bungay, Jerry Burchfield, Jerrold Burchman, Chris Burden, Hans Burkhardt, Nathaniel Bustion, JoAnne Callis, Cameron, Greg S. Card, Elaine Carhartt, Harry Carmean, Jae Carmichael, Carol Caroompas, Barbara Carrasco, Eduardo Carrillo, Karen Carson , Bernie Casey, Elizabeth Catlett, Vija Celmins, Roberto Chavez, Carl Cheng, Judy Chicago, Grace Clements, Caron Colvin, Dan Concholar, Houston Conwill, Ron Cooper, Sister Mary Corita, Philip Cornelius, Mary Corse, Eileen Cowin, Robert Cremean, James L. Croak, Keith Crown, William Crutchfield, Robert Cumming, Darryl Curran, Dorit Cypis, Dan Cytron, Edie Danieli, Avery Danziger, Lowell Darling, Paul Darrow, Alonzo Davis, Dale B. Davis, Michael Davis, Ronald Davis, Woods Davy, Guy De Cointet, Francis de Erdely, Rupert Deese, Tony DeLap, Diane Destiny, Boris Deutsch, Charles Dickson, Richard Diebenkorn, Dietrich, Phil Dike, Guy Dill, Laddie John Dill, Paul Dillon, Morton Dimondstein, Sue Dirksen, John Divola, William Dole, James Doolin, Daniel Douke, Robert Dowd, Roy Dowell, Laurence Dreiband, Hildegarde Duane, Tom Eatherton, Bruce Edelstein, Jean Edelstein, Doug Edge, Leonard Edmondson, Melvin Edwards, Jules Engel, Marion Epting, Sam Erenberg, Merion Estes, Ned Evans, Bruce Everett, Fredericl Eversley, Connor Everts, Edgar Ewing, Martin Facey, Claire Falkenstein, Joe Fay, Lorser Feitelson, Lilly Fenichel, Jud Fine, Bruria Finkel, Max Finkelstein, Oskar Fischinger, Ethel Fisher, Judy Fiskin, Robbert Flick, Betty Davenport Ford, Llyn Foulkes, Sam Francis, Magdalena Frimkess, Michael Frimkess, Walter Gabrielson, Simone Gad, Charles Garabedian, John Garrett, Christopher Georgesco, George Geyer, James S. Gill, Shirl Goedike, Betty Gold, Judith Golden, Jack Goldstein, Joe Goode, John S. Gordon, Robert Graham, Mark Greenfield, Scott Grieger, Ron Griffin, Raul Guerrero, Allan Hacklin, Richard Haines, D.J. Hall, Frederick Hammersley, David Hammons, Lloyd Hamrol, Robert Hansen, Marvin Harden, June Harwood, Maren Hassinger, James Hayward, Wayne Alaniz Healy, Phillip Hefferton, Robert Heinecken, Victor Henderson, Maxwell Hendler, George Herms, Anthony Hernandez, Susan Lautman Hertel, Charles Christopher Hill, Gilah Yelin Hirsch, Diana Hobson, David Hockney, Patrick Hogan, Tom Holste, Varnette Honeywood, Dennis Hopper, Channa Horwitz, Bruce Houston, Bernard Hoyes, Douglas Huebler, James Hueter, Robert Irwin, Sandra Jackman, Suzanne Jackson, James Jarvaise, Connie Jenkins, Tom Jenkins, Daniel Larue Johnson, Don Johnson, Wesley Johnson, Ynez Johnston, John Paul Jones, Mary Jones, Reuben Kadish, Steve Kahn, Matsumi Kanemitsu, Allan Kaprow, Barbara Kasten, Craig Kauffman, Claude Kent, Edward Kienholz, The Kipper Kids, Gloria Kisch, Tom Knechtel, Emil Kosa Jr., Peter Krasnow, Patsy Krebs, Roger Kuntz, Suzanne Lacy, Lili Lakich, Paul Landacre, Doyle Lane, William Leavitt, Rico Lebrun, John Lees, Harold Lehman, Mark Lere, Samella Lewis, Peter Liashkov, Joyce Lightbody, Ron Linden

×