Boulevard is a visual tale of two disparate cities: Paris and Los Angeles. In the early 70s Adam Bartos began to use color photography to document the contemporary urban landscape, infusing his images with a quiet calm and finding composition in even the most random corners. He often focused his lens on his native New York and published a monumental series of photographs examining the modern architecture of the United Nations. In the late 70s and then again in the early 80s, Bartos traveled to Los Angeles and to Paris. These two influential trips would have a strong and lasting impact upon his vision. And yet, until recently, Bartos had never considered the two cities–or bodies of work–together. In this book, an intriguing dialogue takes place before our eyes. As we venture through the scarcely inhabited hotel rooms, backyards, gas stations, and, inevitably, city streets, we are struck by the graphical relationships, the surprisingly similar color palate between the two. There is a magnetism and repulsion operating here polar opposites–in art and life–that at unexpected moments converge and suddenly attract. Novelist, essayist, and travel writer Geoff Dyer examines the two. Essay by Geoff Dyer.

The Space Race was an exhilirating moment in history, alternately frighten-ing, thrilling, awe-inspiring, and ultimately, sublime. Its most enigmatic element was the competition. The Soviets seemed less technologically sophisticated (at least from the American perspective) but in fact won many of the races: first satellite to orbit the earth; first man in space; first unmanned landings on Mars, Venus, and the Moon; first woman in space; most powerful rockets; and, until its recent fiery death, the most long-lived space station to name but a few. The inherent contradictions of the age–the mixture of technologies high and low, of nostalgia and progress, of pathos and promise–are revealed in Kosmos, Adam Bartos’s astonishing photographic survey of the Soviet space program. Bartos’ fascination with this subject led him to seek out places like the bedroom where Yuri Gagarian slept the night before his history-making flight into space, located in the Baiknour Cosmodrome, the one-time top-secret space complex in the Kazakh desert. Bartos also takes us inside the cockpit of the Merkur space capsule, used to ferry crew members and supplies to the super-secret Almaz orbital space stations, and behind the changing screens cosmonauts used before being fitted for their space suits at Zvezda, the chief manufacturer of Soviet life-support systems. In total, Kosmos presents over 100 of Bartos’s photographs, rich with the incongruities of the history, science, culture, and politics of the Space Age. Professor Svetlana Boym’s insightful introduction to the technological and cultural aspects of Soviet space exploration provides a fitting context for the photographs.

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