Michaël Borremans: Black Mould documents the artist’s first exhibition at David Zwirner, London in 2015 and his first solo presentation in the city in ten years. This intimately scaled catalogue, which has been designed by the artist in collaboration with Kim Beirnaert, includes 32 small- and large-scale paintings from his new series, most of which feature anonymous, black-robed characters. Alone or in groups, they perform mysterious acts within monochromatic spaces reminiscent of an artist’s barren studio. Seemingly behaving according to a symbolic language of their own, they pose alone or interact in communal dances, with some figures holding torches and others exposed naked from the waist down. Their facelessness opens up ambiguous narrative possibilities, as if they were empty canvases with which to construct meaning. Like archetypes capable of embodying shifting meanings, the blank figures become a mold for the human condition, at once satirical, tragic, humorous and above all, contradictory.

This monograph offers the first survey of Belgian painter Michaël Borremans’ drawings. Like the paintings, the drawings favor absurd fragmentary figures that inhabit an indeterminate time. Because of Borremans’ drab palate, these figures dwell in a gloomy universe that only heightens the uncanny subject matter. Critic David Coggins has noted, “Michaël Borremans’ portraits of somber young men, elusively posed before muted backgrounds, create a tone of uncertainty that becomes a virtue, not an evasion. Working both large and small, he grounds his paintings (all oil on canvas) in traditional Realism, achieving finely rendered details, soft light and surfaces that are delicate and painterly.” The drawings envelop viewers in a similarly surreal, ambiguous and unreliable universe, depicted with a subdued combination of pencil, watercolor, ballpoint, white ink and coffee washes. They make use of newspapers, books, magazines and turn-of-the-century photographic archives as source material. This volume includes an essay by critic and art historian Michael Amy. Borremans is represented in New York by David Zwirner.

Since the late 1990s, when he first began to produce drawings and paintings, Michaël Borremans has created an extraordinarily mature body of work that has captured international attention. The disparate spaces he imagines in his paintings, drawings, sculptures and films are unified by an uncanny sense of dislocation and an often unsettling beauty. Rendered in complex palettes and exquisite techniques, Borremans’ works in all media embrace a rich legacy of artistic progenitors, but remain firmly anchored in the present. Presenting over 100 works created by the artist over a 14-year period in all media, this publication includes many works not previously reproduced in books or catalogues, offering the most complete overview of Borremans’ oeuvre to date. Contributions include a concise and incisive overview of Borremans’ practice; a revealing, in-depth interview between the main author of the book, Jeffrey Grove, and the artist, addressing process, influence and philosophical and critical issues; as well as more than 50 individual entries and mini-essays on individual works in the artist’s oeuvre by notable writers, curators, filmmakers and musicians. Described by the artist as “the mother of all Borremans books,” Michaël Borremans: As Sweet As It Gets is published on the occasion of a major mid-career retrospective.
Initially trained in photography and graphic design, the Belgian artist Michaël Borremans (born 1963) turned to painting at the age of 30. Work by the artist is held in numerous public collections, including The Art Institute of Chicago; High Museum of Art, Atlanta, Georgia; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Borremans lives and works in Ghent.

PROPORTIO features specially commissioned artworks by contemporary artists, 20th century masterpieces, Old Master paintings, archaeological artefacts, as well as architectural models and a large library of historical books on proportions. All these works provide a lens to help us see what proportion can teach us about the essential design of the present and how we can use this knowledge to create a blueprint for the future. This exhibition is an opportunity to explore universal proportions and an invitation to reflect upon the interconnectedness of our universe. Proportio includes newly commissioned installations by contemporary artists such as Marina Abramovíc, Anish Kapoor, Massimo Bartolini, Rei Naito, Michaël Borremans, Ettore Spaletti, along with existing masterpieces by Ellsworth Kelly, Carl André and Sol Lewitt, as well as antiquities, Old Masters and antique architectural models.

The first volume of Vitamin P, published in 2002, inaugurated a vibrant period for painting. Since its publication, a whole new generation of painters has emerged, some inspired by the artists who appeared in that book, others taking cues from new sources. Vitamin P2 introduces this new wave of painters to the world. The vast medium of painting continues to be a central pillar of artistic practice, and Vitamin P2 presents the outstanding artists who are currently engaging with and pushing the boundaries of the medium. Over 80 international critics, artists and curators have nominated the 115 artists who have made a fresh, unique or innovative contribution to recent painting. All of the artists in Vitamin P2 have recently emerged onto the international scene, and none appeared in the first Vitamin P. An introduction by Barry Schwabsky, who also wrote the introduction for Vitamin P, provides a broad overview of recent developments in the medium while also looking towards its future. Artists featured in Vitamin P2: Nina Chanel Abney, Richard Aldrich, Ellen Altfest, Hurvin Anderson, Juan Araujo, Tauba Auerbach, Karin Mamma Andersson, Jules de Balincourt, Antonio Ballester Moreno, Tilo Baumgartel, Hernan Bas, Michael Borremans, Mark Bradford, Kerstin Brätsch, Lisa Brice, Rafal Bujnowski, Stephen Bush, Varda Caivano, Brian Calvin, Gillian Carnegie, Sarah Crowner, William Daniels, Noah Davis, Philippe Decrauzat, Benjamin Degen, Kaye Donachie, Pierre Dorion, Milena Dragicevic, Thomas Eggerer, Nicole Eisenman, Ida Ekblad, Zhang Enli, Michael Fullerton, Wayne Gonzales, Adrian Ghenie, Mark Grotjahn, Wade Guyton, Josephine Halvorson, N. S. Harsha, Richard Hawkins, Carmen Herrera, Charline Von Heyl, Alex Hubbard, Jacqueline Humphries, Nathan Hylden, Merlin James, Xylor Jane, Jia Ailli, Magdalena Jitrik, Chantal Joffe, Chris Johanson, Jitish Kallat, Maki Na Kamura, Jacob Kassay, Khalif Kelly, Martin Kobe, Jutta Koether, Tomasz Kowalski, Makiko Kudo, Stefan Kürten, Li Dafang, Li Shurui, Li Songsong, Liang Yuanwei, Liu Xiaodong, Marcin Maciejowski, Tala Madani, Nalini Malani, Victor Man, I Nyoman Masriadi, Birgit Megerle, Dianna Molzan, Katy Moran, Kristine Moran, Justin Mortimer, Farhad Moshiri, Surendran Nair, Odili Donald Odita, Paulina Olowska, Silke Otto-Knapp, Christopher Orr, Alessandro Pessoli, Jon Pestoni, Vitaly Pushnitsky, R. H. Quaytman, Blake Rayne, Clare E. Rojas, Sterling Ruby, Christoph Ruckhäberle, Serban Savu, Maaike Schoorel, Dana Schutz, Raqib Shaw, Amy Sillman, Anj Smith, Josh Smith, Glenn Sorensen, Neal Tait, Mickalene Thomas, Padraig Timoney, Alexander Tinei, Phoebe Unwin, Lesley Vance, Pieter Vermeersch, Kelley Walker, Wang Xingwei, Corinne Wasmuht, Matthias Weischer, Andro Wekua, Wendy White, Katharina Wulff, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, Luiz Zerbini, Jakub Julian Ziolkowski

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