The design profession doesn’t produce many larger-than-life figures. Robert Brownjohn BJ, to just about everyone who knew him, and everyone did was one. His gifts were immense, as were his appetites. Enfant terrible and visionary, he was both. Mick and the Stones wanted to hang with him. Of course it couldn’t last. Robert Brownjohn was simply too big for this world. He died in 1970 at the age of 45, a victim of his own excesses. Today, he is best remembered for his sexy James Bond credit sequences. But Brownjohn’s legacy is far more significant, and his story has all the drama and pathos of a Hollywood blockbuster. Now, for the first time, this extraordinary life and career is remembered in print, with all its richness and complexity. Robert Brownjohn: Sex and Typography tracks the story of this legend from his early years as the prized student of Laszlo Moholy-Nagy to his days as a visionary star in the New York design world of the sixties and his later years as an icon in the film and advertising world of swinging London. Robert Brownjohn illustrates the dynamic work Brownjohn produced on his own and as a cofounder of the firms Brownjohn, Chermayeff, and Geismar in New York, and Cammell, Hudson, and Brownjohn in London, including campaigns for such giants as Pirelli, IBM, and Midland Bank. Robert Brownjohn is both an inspirational monograph of creative genius and a window into the life of a Falstaffian figure who just happened to be one of the formative designers of the twentieth century.

In Context: James Turrell, Occluded Front was curated by Julia Brown and featured works in light, space, and perception created between 1967 and 1985. The survey included five major installations with three Projector Pieces and three new pieces commissioned for the Temporary Contemporary space.

A subversive look at postmodern architecture through its ephemera

Postmodern architecture was characterized by four dominant beliefs: that architecture was distinct from the materiality of things; that history had an operative role to play in the present; that the emergence of a culture dominated by images enabled architects to equate drawing with authorship; and that architecture could secure its status among the arts by staking a claim to the exhibition space. While each strand of this belief system had deep historical roots, the expanding reach of American corporations played a crucial role in transforming these ideas into what was then termed the first global style.

In this volume, Sylvia Lavin looks at a series of canonical buildings of the late 20th century alongside archival materials―invoices, surveys, exhibition posters, reproduced models, travel photography, Xeroxed drawings―from the CCA and other museum collections that represent the work of Peter Eisenman, Aldo Rossi, Venturi Scott Brown Associates, Vincent Scully, Michael Graves, James Stirling, Michael Hejduk, Cedric Price and others.

Sylvia Lavin is Professor of Architectural History and Theory at UCLA.

This book begins with the observation that contemporary artists have embraced and employed gravity as an immaterial readymade. Necessarily focusing on material practices – chiefly sculpture, installation, performance, and film – this discussion takes account of how and why artists have used gravity and explores the similarities between their work and the popular cultural forms of circus, vaudeville, burlesque, and film. Works by Rodney Graham, Stan Douglas, and Robert Smithson are mediated through ideas of Gnostic doubt, atomism, and new materialism. In other examples – by John Wood and Paul Harrison, Gordon Matta-Clark, Peter Fischli and David Weiss, Trisha Brown, and Bas Jan Ader – mass and momentum, falling objects, and falling bodies are examined in relation to architecture, sculpture, and dance. In performances, projects and events curated by Bruce Nauman, Santiago Sierra, and Catherine Yass, gravity is resisted in Sisyphean ordeals and death-defying stunts. This account of contemporary art and performance, read through the invisible membrane of gravity, exposes new and distinctive approaches to agency reduction, authorial doubt, and redemptive failure.

Analytical compilation of essays on the energy issue in architecture – Texts by multiple authors and Foreword by James Wines – ON SITE Publications: New York, NY USA 1974 On Energy contains an examination of energy in the light of new conceptual ideas, which may determine the shape of our environment. The energy question is treated as a psychological, sociological, technological, and aesthetic phenomena with potential impact on conservation practices, perception and habitat. The publication is divided into sections: On Resources, On Systems, On Mobility, On Habitat, On Synergy, On Iconology. Partial list of contributors includes: Hugh Hardy, James S. Mellett, Renee Dubos, John Lobell, Allan Kaprow, Ant Farm, Percival Goodman, Mimi Lobell, Fred Dubin, Denise Scott Brown, Lewis Mumford.

Utopianism is not dead; it has migrated from politics to materialism. This book, says Canadian industrial designer Mau (who founded Toronto City College’s Institute Without Borders), is “not about the world of design; it’s about the design of the world.” In a form that is part Apple ad, part Powerpoint presentation and part architectural pastiche à la Rem Koolhaus, Mau’s volume brings together designs and theories (mostly Western) and photographers (global) that “tap into global commons,” “distribute capacity” and “embrace paradox”: superstrong fibers modeled on gecko hairs; “sustainable business” that embraces corporate accountability; the “redesigning” of Third World property law; genetic engineering, macro- and microimaging technologies; virtual reality technology that allows collaboration over large distances; a “cyberneticized” military that paradoxically has more nonviolent options. All of these ideas (some of which are now reality) are here in words and pictures, often further explained through q&a’s with leading researchers. The result reads, intentionally, like a friendly corporate prospectus or catalogue, except that the “product” on offer is a radically hopeful vision of the future. With 250 color and 50 b&w photos in a fractally chaotic layout, and a text that speaks in affirmative sound bites, this book offers a vision of the world in a package designed to get readers excited about stoves that burn peanut shells, superlight gels that can protect flowers from flame, and plants and microbes that turn open sewers into water supplies. It succeeds beautifully. Includes transcripts of interviews with: Philip Ball, Janine Benyus, Stewart Brand, Stephen Browne, Carol Burns, James Der Derian, Bill Drayton, Gwynne Dyer, Freeman Dyson, Ian Foster, Felice Frankel, Robert Freling, Ashok Gadgil, Catherine Gray, Hazel Henderson, Dean Kamen, Arthur Kroker, Robert S. Langer, Jaime Lerner, Lawrence Lessig, David Malin, Michael McDonough, William McDonough, Seymour Melman, Nancy Padian, Matt Ridley, Jeffrey Sachs, Richard Smalley, Hernando de Soto, Bruce Sterling and Eugene Thacker.

In “Why America Fights,” Susan A. Brewer, a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point, says wartime presidents chant political propaganda instinctively, as if leveling with the citizenry would rally dissent and gum the chances for conquest. In understated prose and meticulous detail — 595 end notes in six chapters — Brewer ably argues that the strategies of presidential persuasion for starting or remaining in wars are little more than watery stews of lies, bluffs and exaggerations or the perfuming of facts to scent the air with what Donald Rumsfeld called “perception management.” Brewer examines the narratives of six military efforts: the Philippine War, World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War and the Iraq war. Under a succession of presidents — McKinley, Wilson, Roosevelt, Truman, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon and Bush — American involvement was enshrined as humanitarian and the enemy demonized as barbaric. Whether the United States went to the Philippines to aid what William McKinley called our “little brown brothers,” or to Iraq for what Bush called “a divine mission,” or to extend Madeleine Albright’s credo that America is “the indispensable nation. We stand tall. We see further into the future than other countries,” Americans suffered few civilian casualties and saw other lands ravaged, not their own. With presidents trying to persuade — not educate — the public, Brewer writes, a “propaganda campaign seeks to disguise a paradoxical message: war is not a time for citizens to have an informed debate and make up their own minds even as they fight in the name of freedom to do just that.” Brewer’s scholarship on the manipulation of public opinion places her in the company of Noam Chomsky, James Loewen, Michael True, Howard Zinn and other historians or social analysts of skeptical bent. Like them, she scours the record to counter the historical amnesia of the public. She documents how presidents at war portrayed themselves as travelers on the high road to peace and justice, not the low road to battle and dystopia: “Throughout the twentieth century, American leaders presented war aims dedicated to the spread of democracy and freedom rather than the expansion of U.S. power.” Although, Brewer writes, “the United States repeatedly denied that it sought more territory, it steadily acquired naval and military bases. As of 2008, the United States had more than seven hundred bases in 132 countries. . . . Its priority was the maintenance of governments, whether democratic or not, that allowed the Americans economic and strategic access to their countries.” “Why America Fights” would be stronger had a chapter been devoted to the mainstream media, which so often act as dummies dandled on the knees of presidential ventriloquists mouthing propaganda. While Brewer touches on the collective complicity in spots — the Pentagon’s Office of Media Outreach and its “Operation Truth” campaign to bring pliant talk show hosts to Iraq, the Committee on Public Information that sold reporters on Woodrow Wilson’s “war to end war” policies — her analysis lacks the depth found in Norman Solomon’s 2005 book, “War Made Easy: How Presidents and Pundits Keep Spinning Us to Death” or William Blum’s 2003 “Killing Hope: U.S. Military and CIA Interventions Since World War II.” Brewer’s interpretation of presidential propaganda is likely to be dismissed by keepers of the temple’s secrets as a baleful outburst by a lefty professor hawking her ideological assumptions. That might be plausible, except that “Why America Fights” soars well above the usual marks of bias: carelessness, rants or conclusions not connected to facts. Brewer’s work is one with George Orwell’s line in “Homage to Catalonia”: “One of the most horrible features of war is that the war-propaganda, all the screaming and lies and hatred, comes invariably from people who are not fighting.” It also gives credibility to Martin Luther King Jr.’s April 4, 1967, comment: “The greatest purveyor of violence in the world today [is] my own government.” The accuracy of that judgment, heightened, not lessened, by the passing of time, might be better relished if more historians were as questioning as Susan Brewer.

In 1936 an American ornithologist named James Bond published the definitive taxonomy Birds of the West Indies. Ian Fleming, an active bird-watcher living in Jamaica, appropriated the name for his novel’s lead character. He found it “flat and colourless,” a fitting choice for a character intended to be “anonymous… a blunt instrument in the hands of the government.” In Field Guide to Birds of the West Indies, Taryn Simon casts herself as James Bond (1900–89) the ornithologist, and identifies, photographs and classifies all the birds that appear within the 24 films of the James Bond franchise. The appearance of many of the birds was unplanned and virtually undetected, operating as background noise for whatever set they happened to fly into. Simon’s ornithological discoveries occupy a liminal space―confined within the fiction of the James Bond universe and yet wholly separate from it. This taxonomy of 331 birds is a precise consideration of a new nature found in an alternate reality.
Taryn Simon (born 1975) is a multidisciplinary artist who has worked in photography, text, sculpture and performance. Guided by an interest in systems of categorization and classification, her practice involves extensive research into the power and structure of secrecy and the precarious nature of survival. Simon’s works have been the subject of monographic exhibitions at Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing (2013); The Museum of Modern Art, New York (2012); Tate Modern, London (2011); Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin (2011); and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2007). Permanent collections include The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Tate Modern, the Guggenheim Museum, Centre Georges Pompidou and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Her work is included in the 56th Venice Biennale (2015). She is a graduate of Brown University and a Guggenheim Fellow. Simon lives and works in New York.

Los Angeles is a city of dualities-sunshine and noir, coastline beaches and urban grit, natural beauty and suburban sprawl, the obvious and the hidden. Both Sides of Sunset: Photographing Los Angeles reveals these dualities and more, in images captured by master photographers such as Bruce Davidson, Lee Friedlander, Daido Moriyama, Julius Shulman and Garry Winogrand, as well as many younger artists, among them Matthew Brandt, Katy Grannan, Alex Israel, Lise Sarfati and Ed Templeton, just to name a few. Taken together, these individual views by more than 130 artists form a collective vision of a place where myth and reality are often indistinguishable. Spinning off the highly acclaimed Looking at Los Angeles (Metropolis Books, 2005), Both Sides of Sunset presents an updated and equally unromantic vision of this beloved and scorned metropolis. In the years since the first book was published, the artistic landscape of Los Angeles has flourished and evolved. The extraordinary Getty Museum project Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980 focused global attention on the city’s artistic heritage, and this interest has only continued to grow. Both Sides of Sunset showcases many of the artists featured in the original book-such as Lewis Baltz, Catherine Opie, Stephen Shore and James Welling-but also incorporates new images that portray a city that is at once unhinged and driven by irrepressible exuberance. Proceeds from the sale of the book will benefit Inner-City Arts-an oasis of learning, achievement and creativity in the heart of Los Angeles’ Skid Row that brings arts education to elementary, middle and high school students.

Controversy swirled around the Black Panthers from the moment the revolutionary black nationalist Party was founded in Oakland, California, in 1966. Since that time, the group that J. Edgar Hoover called “the single greatest threat to the nation’s internal security” has been celebrated and denigrated, deified and vilified. Rarely, though, has it received the sort of nuanced analysis offered in this rich interdisciplinary collection. Historians, along with scholars in the fields of political science, English, sociology, and criminal justice, examine the Panthers and their present-day legacy with regard to revolutionary violence, radical ideology, urban politics, popular culture, and the media. The essays consider the Panthers as distinctly American revolutionaries, as the products of specific local conditions, and as parts of other movements of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

One contributor evaluates the legal basis of the Panthers’ revolutionary struggle, explaining how they utilized and critiqued the language of the Constitution. Others explore the roles of individuals, looking at a one-time Panther imprisoned for a murder he did not commit and an FBI agent who monitored the activities of the Panthers’ Oakland branch. Contributors assess the Panthers’ relations with Students for a Democratic Society, the Young Lords, the Brown Berets, and the Peace and Freedom Party. They discuss the Party’s use of revolutionary aesthetics, and they show how the Panthers manipulated and were manipulated by the media. Illuminating some of the complexities involved in placing the Panthers in historical context, this collection demonstrates that the scholarly search for the Black Panthers has only just begun.

Contributors. Bridgette Baldwin, Davarian L. Baldwin, David Barber, Rod Bush, James T. Campbell, Tim Lake, Jama Lazerow, Edward P. Morgan, Jeffrey O. G. Ogbar, Roz Payne, Robert O. Self, Yohuru Williams, Joel Wilson

“L.A. Rising: SoCal Artists Before 1980” is the first comprehensive pictorial showcase of the diverse universe of artists working in the Los Angeles area during the formative period of Los Angeles’ art history. Over 800 color and 100 black and white images of work by almost 500 artists illustrate the edited texts quoted from critical reviews of exhibitions and writings of the period. Special efforts have been made to include both recognized and heretofore unsung key players in the Los Angeles art world. The book acknowledges the legacy of a full range of artists whose lives and work in Los Angeles enabled the city to become the international contemporary art capital it is today.

Contributors: Lyn Kienholz, Elizabeta Betinski, Corinne Nelson, Clinton Adams, Ron Adams, Bas Jan Ader, John Alberty, Lita Albuquerque, Anders Aldrin, Peter Alexander, Martha Alf, Neda Al-Hilali, Carlos Almaraz, John Altoon, Mabel Alvarez, Arthur Ames, Jean Goodwin Ames, Laura Anderson, Oliver Andrews, Eleanor Antin, Craig Antrim, Chuck Arnoldi, Michael Asher, David Askevold, Walter Askin, Ralph Bacerra, Don Bachardy, Jo Baer, Herman Kofi Bailey, George P. Baker, Michael Balog, John Baldessari, Jack Barth, Richmond Barthé, Joel Bass, Lynn Bassler, Robert C. Bassler, Wall Batterton, Herbert Bayer, Phoebe Beasley, Larry Bell, Billy Al Bengston, Karl Benjamin, Ed Bereal, Pat Berger, Tony Berlant, Ben Berlin, Eugene Berman, Wallace Berman, John Bernhardt, Gary Beydler, Edward Biberman, Natalie Bieser, Les Biller, Annette Bird, Streeter Blair, Sandy Bleifer, Bob and Bob, Gloria Cole Bohanen, Douglas Bond, Dorr Bothwell, David Bradford, Rex Brandt, Jerry Brane, Bettina Brendel, Michael Brewster, William Brice, Nicholas Brigante, Morris Broderson, William Theophilus Brown, Nancy Buchanan, Conrad Buff II, David Bungay, Jerry Burchfield, Jerrold Burchman, Chris Burden, Hans Burkhardt, Nathaniel Bustion, JoAnne Callis, Cameron, Greg S. Card, Elaine Carhartt, Harry Carmean, Jae Carmichael, Carol Caroompas, Barbara Carrasco, Eduardo Carrillo, Karen Carson , Bernie Casey, Elizabeth Catlett, Vija Celmins, Roberto Chavez, Carl Cheng, Judy Chicago, Grace Clements, Caron Colvin, Dan Concholar, Houston Conwill, Ron Cooper, Sister Mary Corita, Philip Cornelius, Mary Corse, Eileen Cowin, Robert Cremean, James L. Croak, Keith Crown, William Crutchfield, Robert Cumming, Darryl Curran, Dorit Cypis, Dan Cytron, Edie Danieli, Avery Danziger, Lowell Darling, Paul Darrow, Alonzo Davis, Dale B. Davis, Michael Davis, Ronald Davis, Woods Davy, Guy De Cointet, Francis de Erdely, Rupert Deese, Tony DeLap, Diane Destiny, Boris Deutsch, Charles Dickson, Richard Diebenkorn, Dietrich, Phil Dike, Guy Dill, Laddie John Dill, Paul Dillon, Morton Dimondstein, Sue Dirksen, John Divola, William Dole, James Doolin, Daniel Douke, Robert Dowd, Roy Dowell, Laurence Dreiband, Hildegarde Duane, Tom Eatherton, Bruce Edelstein, Jean Edelstein, Doug Edge, Leonard Edmondson, Melvin Edwards, Jules Engel, Marion Epting, Sam Erenberg, Merion Estes, Ned Evans, Bruce Everett, Fredericl Eversley, Connor Everts, Edgar Ewing, Martin Facey, Claire Falkenstein, Joe Fay, Lorser Feitelson, Lilly Fenichel, Jud Fine, Bruria Finkel, Max Finkelstein, Oskar Fischinger, Ethel Fisher, Judy Fiskin, Robbert Flick, Betty Davenport Ford, Llyn Foulkes, Sam Francis, Magdalena Frimkess, Michael Frimkess, Walter Gabrielson, Simone Gad, Charles Garabedian, John Garrett, Christopher Georgesco, George Geyer, James S. Gill, Shirl Goedike, Betty Gold, Judith Golden, Jack Goldstein, Joe Goode, John S. Gordon, Robert Graham, Mark Greenfield, Scott Grieger, Ron Griffin, Raul Guerrero, Allan Hacklin, Richard Haines, D.J. Hall, Frederick Hammersley, David Hammons, Lloyd Hamrol, Robert Hansen, Marvin Harden, June Harwood, Maren Hassinger, James Hayward, Wayne Alaniz Healy, Phillip Hefferton, Robert Heinecken, Victor Henderson, Maxwell Hendler, George Herms, Anthony Hernandez, Susan Lautman Hertel, Charles Christopher Hill, Gilah Yelin Hirsch, Diana Hobson, David Hockney, Patrick Hogan, Tom Holste, Varnette Honeywood, Dennis Hopper, Channa Horwitz, Bruce Houston, Bernard Hoyes, Douglas Huebler, James Hueter, Robert Irwin, Sandra Jackman, Suzanne Jackson, James Jarvaise, Connie Jenkins, Tom Jenkins, Daniel Larue Johnson, Don Johnson, Wesley Johnson, Ynez Johnston, John Paul Jones, Mary Jones, Reuben Kadish, Steve Kahn, Matsumi Kanemitsu, Allan Kaprow, Barbara Kasten, Craig Kauffman, Claude Kent, Edward Kienholz, The Kipper Kids, Gloria Kisch, Tom Knechtel, Emil Kosa Jr., Peter Krasnow, Patsy Krebs, Roger Kuntz, Suzanne Lacy, Lili Lakich, Paul Landacre, Doyle Lane, William Leavitt, Rico Lebrun, John Lees, Harold Lehman, Mark Lere, Samella Lewis, Peter Liashkov, Joyce Lightbody, Ron Linden

Included artists: Adams Alice, Agostini Peter, Andre Carl, Antonakos Stephen, Arneson Robert, Artschwager Richard, Bochner Mel, Bollinger Bill, Bourgeois Louise, Brown Marvin, Calder Alexander, Celmins Vija, Chamberlain John, Chase-Riboud Barbara, Chryssa, Corse Mary, De Andrea John, De Rivera Jose, Di Suvero Mark, Duff John, Edwards Melvin, Eversley Frederick John, Ferrara Jackie, Ferrer Rafael, Flavin Dan, Frank Mary, Friedberg Richard, Gilhooley David, Graham Robert, Graves Nancy, Grieger Scott, Haber Ira Joel, Hanson Duane, Hubbard Robert, Hudson Robert, Hunt Richard, James Laurace, Johnson Daniel La Rue, Judd Danald, Kipp Lyman, Kohn Gabriel, Larson Haydn, Lerner Marilyn, Le Va Barry, Levinson Mon, Linder Jean, Lipton Seymour, Lobe Robert, McCracken John, Melchert James, Miss Mary, Moore G.E., Morris Robert, Morton Ree, Murray Robert, Myers Forrest, Nauman Bruce, Neri Manuel, Noguchi Isamu, Noland Kenneth, Oldenburg Claes, Oppenheim Dennis, Ossorio Alfonso, Price Kenneth, Reginato Peter, Rickey George, Roche Jim, Rockburne Dorothea, Rohm Robert, Ruppersberg Allen, Saar Bettye, Samaras Lucas, Scanga Italo, Segal george, Serra Richard, Shapiro Joel, Shaw Richard, Shostak Ed, Smith George, Smith Tony, Smithson Robert, Snelson Kenneth, Sonnier Keith, Steiner Michael, Stone Sylvia, Strider Marjorie, Sugarman George, Tetherow Michael, Todd Mike, Truitt Anne, Valentine DeWain, Van Buren Richard, Van Fleet Ellen, Voulkos Peter, Westermann H.C., Wiley William T., Wilmarth Christopher, Wilson May, Winsor Jackie

Parkett 78features the artists Ernesto Neto, Olaf Nicolai and Rebecca Warren. Neto’s drooping, opaque lycra installations envelop the viewer in a fog of fabric, a cushion for the gaze, their milky skins leaving children ecstatic and adults in a Fredric Jamesonian “Hyperspace.” Olaf Nicolai’s concept-driven art, like much of the avant-garde work of the last half-century, remains set on integrating art with daily life. We experience this “blurring” in his randomly arranged pre-fabricated Pantone colors, ornamental stones taken from a 1960s Dresden shopping mall and wall text reading, “A short catalogue of things that you think you want ” Rebecca Warren makes vulgar, lumpy plasticine figures that show the influence of Giacometti and R. Crumb alike. As Neal Brown writes, her figures are, “fingered and improperly squeezed into something that is compulsively-chaotic-masturbatory-fat-ugly-disfigured-repressed-incontinent-excretory-bestial-bulimic ” The issue also features Erwin Wurm, Andro Wekua and Vito Acconci, with texts by Yuko Hasegawa, Paulo Herkenhoff, Charles Esche, Vincent P coil, Catherine Lampert, Marjorie Perloff and Kate Fowle, among others.

Contains contributions by George Brecht, Claus Bremer, Earle Brown, Joseph Bryd, John Cage, David Degener, Walter De Maria, Henry Flynt, Yoko Ono, Dick Higgins, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Terry Jennings Dennis, Ding Dong, Ray Johnson, Jackson Mac Low, Richard Maxfield, Malka Safro, Simone Forti, Nam June Paik, Terry Riley, Dieter Rot [Dieter Roth], James Waring, Emmett Williams, Christian Wolff, and La Monte Young. 2 loose sheets laid in (musical score and perforated sheet); 2 mounted envelopes plus contents (performace scores) are missing.

Band 1: malerei, plastik, performance.- Band 2: fotografie film video.- Band 3: handzeichnungen, utopisches design, bücher.- Artsts: Berenice Abbott, Hermann Albert, Carl Andre, Ben d’Armagnac, Christian Ludwig Attersee, Vito Acconci, Pierre Alechinsky, Theo Angelopoulos, Arman (Armand Fernandez), Bernhard Aubertin, Valerio Adami, Gerhard Altenbourg, Ottomar Anschütz, Fernando Arrabal, Joannis Avramidis, Robert Adamson, Robert Altman, Horst Antes, Eduardo Arroyo, Alice Aycock, Peter Ackermann, Anatol, Ant Farm, Art & Language, Billy Adler, Gisela Andersch, Shusaku Arakawa, David Askevold, Chantal Akerman, Laurie Anderson, Diane Arbus, Eugène Atget, Francis Bacon, Monika Baumgartl, Joseph Beuys, Fernando Botero, Kevin Brownlow & Andrew Mollo, Michael Badura, Hippolyte Bayard, Michael von Biel, Margaret Bourke-White, Günter Brus, Eduard Denis Baldús, Thomas Bayrle, Werner Bischof, Mathew B. Brady, Anatol Brosilowsky, Balthus, Cecil Beaton, Louis-Auguste Bisson & Auguste-Rosalie Bisson, Brassaï (Gyula Halász), Wojciech Bruszewski, Joachim Bandau, Bernd e Hilla Becher, Irma Blanck, George Brecht, Luis Buñuel, Jared Bark, Stephan Beck, Karl Blossfeldt, KP Brehmer, Chris Burden, Robert Barry, Bill Beckley, Bernhard Blume, George Hendrik Breitner, Daniel Buren, Jennifer Bartlett, John Ernest Joseph Bellocq, Mel Bochner, Heinz Breloh, Scott Burton, Gianfranco Baruchello, Carmelo Bene, Peter Bogdanovich, Robert Bresson, Michael Buthe, Giorgio Batistella, Franz Bernhard, Claus Böhmler, Stuart Brisley, James Lee Byars, Gerd Baukhage, Jean-Marie Bertholin, Blythe Bohnen, Jürgen Brodwolf, Horst H. Baumann, Nuccio Bertone, Karl Bohrmann, Marcel Broodthaers, Bodo Baumgarten, Jean-Louis Bertucelli, Christian Boltanski, Stanley Brouwn, Enzo Cacciola, Robert Capa, Barbara Chase-Riboud, Pinchas Cohen-Gan, Michael Craig-Martin, Julia Margaret Cameron, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Eduardo Chillida, James Collins, Fritz Cremer, Colin Campell, Étienne Carjat, Christo, Miguel Condé, José Luis Cuevas, Peter Campus, Ugo Carrega, Chryssa, Tony Conrad, Edward Curtis, Louis Cane, Lewis Carroll, Chuck Close, Steven Cortright, Veassis Caniaris, Claude Chabrol, Harold Cohen, Claudio Costa, Miodrag Djuric (Dado), Douglas Davis, Walter De Maria, Jim Dine, Juan Downey, Louis Daguerre, Ger Dekkers, Agnes Denes, Henry + Bool Alfred + John Dixon, Peter Downsborough, Hanne Darboven, Willem de Kooning, Fred Deux, Dore O., Michael Druks, Alan Davie, Philip Henry Delamotte, Jan Dibbets, Ugo Dossi, Marcel Duchamp, John Davies, Jack Delano, Braco Dimitrijevic, Christian Dotremont, David Douglas Duncan, Don Eddy, Paul Eliasberg, Heinz Emigholz, Ulrich Erben, Walker Evans, Benni Efrat, Ger van Elk, Ed Emshwiller, Hugo Erfurth, Valie Export, Sergej Eisenstein, Peter Henry Emerson, Leo Erb, Garth Evans, Öyvind Fahlström, Federico Fellini, Dan Flavin, Charles Frazier, Lee Friedlander, Herbert Falken, Roger Fenton, Richard Fleischer, Hermine Freed, Hamish Fulton, Ralston Farina, Armand Fernandez, Lucio Fontana, Will Frenken, Heidi Fasnacht, Vincenzo Ferrari, Fred Forest, Achim Freyer, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Robert Filliou, Terry Fox, Gisèle Freund, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Wolfgang Gäfgen, Jochen Gerz, Tina Girouard, Dan Graham, Nancy Graves, Abel Gance, Paul-Armand Gette, Michael Gitlin, Eve Gramatzki, Alan Green, Alexander Gardner, Peter Gidal, Wilhelm von Gloeden, Tom J. Gramse, Marty Greenbaum, Winfred Gaul, Wolfram Giersbach, Jean-Luc Godard, Gotthard Graubner, Alberto Grifi, Rupprecht Geiger, Gilbert & George, Hubertus Gojowczyk, Nancy Graves, Robert Grosvenor, Michael Geissler, Frank Gilette, Kuno Gonschior, Walter Grasskamp, Hetum Gruber, Arnold Genthe, Raimund Girke, Camille Graeser, Gotthard Graubner, Renato Guttuso, Roel D’Haese, Haus-Rucker-Co, Wilhelm Hein, Lewis Hine, Nan Hoover, Helfried Hagenberg, Erich Hauser, Bernhard Heisig, Leon Hirszman, Rebecca Horn, David Hall, Lady Hawarden, Michael Heizer, Antonius Höckelmann, Horst P. Horst, Nigel Hall, Ron Hays, Al Held, David Hockney, George Hoyningen-Huene, Phillipe Halsman, Tim Head, Werner Herzog, Anatol Herzfeld, Alfred Hofkunst, Richard Hamilton, Erwin Heerich, Eva Hesse, Rudolf Hoflehner, Douglas Huebler, Heijo Hangen, Axel Heibel, David Octavius Hill, Edgar Hofschen, Danièle Huillet, Noriyuki Haraguchi, Birgit Hein, John Hilliard, Hans Hollein, Alfonso Hüppi, Karl Horst Hödicke, Shohei Imamura, Will Insley, Jean Ipoustéguy, Patrick Ireland, Hans Paul Isenrath, Ken Jacobs, Paul Jaray, Jasper Johns, Francis Benjamin Johnston, Miklós Jancsó, Jo Jastram, J. Douglas Johnson, Donald Judd, Horst Janssen, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Joan Jonas, Martha Jungwirth, Wolf Kahlen, Buster Keaton, Jürgen Klauke, Beril Korot, Ferdinand Kriwet, Max Kaminski, Ellsworth Kelly, Alexander Kluge, Joseph Kosuth, Germaine Krull, Howard Kanovitz, Michael Kenny, Werner Knaupp, Jannis Kounellis, Shigeko Kubota, Tadeusz Kantor, André Kertész, Günther Knipp, Andras Kovács, Stanley Kubrick, Allan Kaprow, Anselm Kiefer, Milan Knížák, Attila Kovács, Gary Kuehn, Dani Karavan, Harry Kipper, Imi Knoebel, Kurt Kren, Marin Karmitz, Alain Kirili, Alice Kochs, Dieter Krieg, Gertrude Kasebier, Ronald B. Kitaj, Christof Kohlhöfer, Richard Kriesche, On Kawara, Konrad Klapheck, Jiří Kolář, Les Krims, Willem de Kooning, László Lakner, Barry Le Va, Michael Leisgen, Lawrence Lobe, Urs Lüthi, Arthur Lamothe, Russell Lee, Les Levine, Francisco Lopez, Georg Platt Lynes, Richard Landry, Jean Le Gac, Sol LeWitt, Antonio Lopez-Garcia, Nikolaus Lang, Gustave Le Gray, Roy Lichtenstein, Joseph Losey, Dorothea Lange, Malcolm Le Grice, Richard Lindner, Bernhard Luginbühl, John Latham, Barbara Leisgen, Michael Lingner, Bernhard Lüthi, Heinz Mack, Kenneth Martin, Gerhard Merz, Alexander Mitta, Robert Morris, Nino Malfatti, Charles Marville, Mario Merz, Milan Mölzer, Alfons Maria Mucha, Felix H. Man (Hans Baumann), Roberto Matta, Borg Mesch, Bernard Moninot, Ugo Mulas, Robert Mangold, Gordon Matta-Clark, Anette Messager, Henry Moore, Antoni Muntadas, Andy Mann, Wolfgang Mattheuer, Adolphe de Meyer, Stefan Moore, Walter Murch, Werner Mantz, Cynthia Lee Maughan, Duane Michals, Carmengloria Morales, J.-J. Murphy, Piero Manzoni, Antony McCall, Henri Michaux, Marcello Morandini, Zoran Mušič, Giacomo Manzù, Barry McCallion, Rune Mields, Pit Morell, Eadweard Muybridge, Robert Mapplethorpe, Bruce McLean, Antoni Miralda, François Morellet, Brice Marden, Syd Mead, Josef Mikl, Maria Moreno, Agnes Martin, Dariush Mehrjui, Joan Miró, Malcolm Morley, Tomitaro Nachi, Bruce Nauman, Wolfgang Nestler, Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, Maria Nordman, Félix Nadar, Charles Nègre, Richard Newton, Ansgar Nierhoff, Gabriele & Helmut Nothhelfer, Maurizio Nannucci, Werner Nekes, Max Neuhaus, Richard Nonas, Lev V. Nussberg, Dore O., Timothy O’Sullivan, Roman Opalka, Nagisa Oshima, Oswald Oberhuber, Claes Oldenburg, Dennis Oppenheim, Jean Otth, Brian O’Doherty, Claudio Olivieri, Anna Oppermann, Hilmar Pabel, Giulio Paolini, A. R. 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In 1936, an ornithologist called James Bond released the definitive taxonomy of birds found in the Caribbean, titled Birds of the West Indies. Ian Fleming, an active bird watcher living in Jamaica, subsequently appropriated the name for his novel’s lead character. This co-opting of names was the first in a series of substitutions that would become central to the construction of the James Bond narrative. In a meticulous and comprehensive dissection of the Bond films, artist Taryn Simon inventoried women, weapons and vehicles, constant elements in the films between 1962 and 2012. The contents of these categories function as essential accessories to the narrative’s myth of the seductive, powerful and invincible western male. Maintaining the illusion the narrative relies upon–an ageless Bond, state-of-the-art weaponry, herculean vehicles and desirable women–requires constant replacements, and a contract exists between Bond and the viewer, which binds the narrative to that set of expectations. Continually satisfying those obligations allowed Bond to become a ubiquitous brand, a signifier to be activated with each subsequent novel and film. In Birds of the West Indies, Simon presents a visual database of interchangeable variables used in the production of fantasy, through which she examines the economic and emotional value generated by their repetition.
Taryn Simon was born in New York in 1975. She is a graduate of Brown University and a Guggenheim Fellow. Her photographs and writing have been the subject of solo exhibitions at institutions including The Museum of Modern Art, New York (2012), Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2012); Tate Modern, London (2011); Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin (2011); Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2007) and P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center, New York (2003). In 2011 her work was included in the 54th Venice Biennale.

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