In 1936 an American ornithologist named James Bond published the definitive taxonomy Birds of the West Indies. Ian Fleming, an active bird-watcher living in Jamaica, appropriated the name for his novel’s lead character. He found it “flat and colourless,” a fitting choice for a character intended to be “anonymous… a blunt instrument in the hands of the government.” In Field Guide to Birds of the West Indies, Taryn Simon casts herself as James Bond (1900–89) the ornithologist, and identifies, photographs and classifies all the birds that appear within the 24 films of the James Bond franchise. The appearance of many of the birds was unplanned and virtually undetected, operating as background noise for whatever set they happened to fly into. Simon’s ornithological discoveries occupy a liminal space―confined within the fiction of the James Bond universe and yet wholly separate from it. This taxonomy of 331 birds is a precise consideration of a new nature found in an alternate reality.
Taryn Simon (born 1975) is a multidisciplinary artist who has worked in photography, text, sculpture and performance. Guided by an interest in systems of categorization and classification, her practice involves extensive research into the power and structure of secrecy and the precarious nature of survival. Simon’s works have been the subject of monographic exhibitions at Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing (2013); The Museum of Modern Art, New York (2012); Tate Modern, London (2011); Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin (2011); and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2007). Permanent collections include The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Tate Modern, the Guggenheim Museum, Centre Georges Pompidou and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Her work is included in the 56th Venice Biennale (2015). She is a graduate of Brown University and a Guggenheim Fellow. Simon lives and works in New York.

The Art of Walking: A Field Guide is a unique look at walking as a mode of artistic practice and is the first book to explore this fascinating subject of how walking can be used as an artistic medium.

An introductory essay identifies breaks and continuities between walking artists now and the pedestrian activities of the historic- and neo-avant-gardes of the early- and mid-20th Century, respectively. Subsequent visually-led sections deal with recent art engaging with different types of walkers including pilgrims, peripatetic writers and philosophers, dandies, drifters, marchers, stalkers, tour guides and dog walkers.

Artists to be evaluated include Marina Abramovic and Ulay, Vito Acconci, Dennis Adams, Francis Alÿs, Keith Arnatt, Tim Brennan, Stanley Brouwn, Bruce Nauman, Sophie Calle, Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller, Jeremy Deller, Simon Faithfull, Hamish Fulton, Regina José Galindo, Mona Hatoum, Akira Kanayama, Richard Long, The Long March Foundation, Melanie Manchot, Yoko Ono, Adrian Piper, Simon Pope and Kryzysztov Wodiczko.

The British painter, filmmaker, set designer and author Derek Jarman is well-known to a wide audience, particularly as the director of distinctive films and music videos. Less widely known, yet a decisive part of his oeuvre, are the Super 8 films that Jarman made in the 1970s and 1980s. Recorded from the subjective-personal perspective of his handheld camera, the staged compositions convey Jarman’s artistic position, in which life and art constantly, and naturally, connect with one another. The stills from Derek Jarman’s Super 8 films are published here as a series for the first time.

Manifestos by artists, authors, editors, publishers, designers, zinesters explore publishing as artistic practice. Contributors AND Publishing, Oswald de Andrade, Archive Books, Art-Rite, Rasheed Araeen, Tauba Auerbach, Michael Baers, Bibi Bakare-Yusuf, Ricardo Basbaum, Derek Beaulieu, Bernadette Corporation, Riccardo Boglione, Bombay Underground, Jorge Luis Borges, bpNichol, Kate Briggs, Broken Dimanche Press, Eleanor Vonne Brown, Urvashi Butalia, Ulises Carrión, Mariana Castillo Deball, Paul Chan, Chimurenga, Arpita Das, Anita Di Bianco, Guy Debord, Constant Dullaart, Craig Dworkin, Ntone Edjabe, Zenon Fajfer, Marina Fokidis, General Idea, Annette Gilbert, Girls Like Us, Gloria Glitzer, Marianne Groulez, Alex Hamburger, Karl Holmqvist, Lisa Holzer, Mahmood Jamal, Tom Jennings, Ray Johnson, David Jourdan, Sharon Kivland, Kione Kochi, Kwani?, Bruce LaBruce, Tan Lin, El Lissitzky, Alessandro Ludovico, Sara MacKillop, Steve McCaffery, Jonathan Monk, Simon Morris, Mosireen, León Munoz Santini, Takashi Murakami, Deke Nihilson, Aurélie Noury, Johnny Noxzema, Clive Phillpot, Michalis Pichler, Seth Price, Riot Grrrl, Carlos Soto Román, Allen Ruppersberg, Joachim Schmid, Oliver Sieber, Paul Soulellis, Matthew Stadler, Gertrude Stein, Paul Stephens, Hito Steyerl, Mladen Stilinović, Katja Stuke, Temporary Services, Nick Thurston, TIQQUN, Elisabeth Tonnard, V. Vale, Eric Watier, Erik van der Weijde, Lawrence Weiner, Eva Weinmayr, Jan Wenzel, Stephen Willats, Gil J Wolman, zubaan Independent publishing, art publishing, publishing as artistic practice, publishing counterculture, and the zine, DIY, and POD scenes have proliferated over the last two decades. So too have art book fairs, an increasingly important venue—or even medium—for art. Art publishing experienced a similar boom in the 1960s and 1970s, in response to the culture’s “linguistic turn.” Today, art publishing confronts the internet and the avalanche of language and images that it enables. The printed book offers artists both visibility and tangibility. Publishing Manifestos gathers texts by artists, authors, editors, publishers, designers, zinesters, and activists to explore this rapidly expanding terrain for art practice. The book begins in the last century, with texts by Gertrude Stein, El Lissitsky, Oswald de Andrade, and Jorge-Luis Borges. But the bulk of the contributions are from the twenty-first century, with an emphasis on diversity, including contributions from Tauba Auerbach, Mariana Castillo Deball, Ntone Edjabe, Girls Like Us, Karl Holmqvist, Temporary Services, and zubaan. Some contributors take on new forms of production and distribution; others examine the political potential of publishing and the power of collectivity inherent in bookmaking. They explore among other topics, artists’ books, appropriation, conceptual writing, non-Western communities, queer identities, and post-digital publishing. Many texts are reproduced in facsimile—including a handwritten “speculative, future-forward newspaper” from South Africa. Some are proclamatory mission statements, others are polemical self-positioning; some are playful, others explicitly push the boundaries. All help lay the conceptual foundations of a growing field of practice and theory.

Manifestos by artists, authors, editors, publishers, designers, zinesters explore publishing as artistic practice.

Independent publishing, art publishing, publishing as artistic practice, publishing counterculture, and the zine, DIY, and POD scenes have proliferated over the last two decades. So too have art book fairs, an increasingly important venue―or even medium―for art. Art publishing experienced a similar boom in the 1960s and 1970s, in response to the culture’s “linguistic turn.” Today, art publishing confronts the internet and the avalanche of language and images that it enables. The printed book offers artists both visibility and tangibility. Publishing Manifestos gathers texts by artists, authors, editors, publishers, designers, zinesters, and activists to explore this rapidly expanding terrain for art practice.

The book begins in the last century, with texts by Gertrude Stein, El Lissitsky, Oswald de Andrade, and Jorge-Luis Borges. But the bulk of the contributions are from the twenty-first century, with an emphasis on diversity, including contributions from Tauba Auerbach, Mariana Castillo Deball, Ntone Edjabe, Girls Like Us, Karl Holmqvist, Temporary Services, and zubaan. Some contributors take on new forms of production and distribution; others examine the political potential of publishing and the power of collectivity inherent in bookmaking. They explore among other topics, artists’ books, appropriation, conceptual writing, non-Western communities, queer identities, and post-digital publishing. Many texts are reproduced in facsimile―including a handwritten “speculative, future-forward newspaper” from South Africa. Some are proclamatory mission statements, others are polemical self-positioning; some are playful, others explicitly push the boundaries. All help lay the conceptual foundations of a growing field of practice and theory.

Contributors
AND Publishing, Oswald de Andrade, Archive Books, Art-Rite, Rasheed Araeen, Tauba Auerbach, Michael Baers, Bibi Bakare-Yusuf, Ricardo Basbaum, Derek Beaulieu, Bernadette Corporation, Riccardo Boglione, Bombay Underground, Jorge Luis Borges, bpNichol, Kate Briggs, Broken Dimanche Press, Eleanor Vonne Brown, Urvashi Butalia, Ulises Carrión, Mariana Castillo Deball, Paul Chan, Chimurenga, Arpita Das, Anita Di Bianco, Guy Debord, Constant Dullaart, Craig Dworkin, Ntone Edjabe, Zenon Fajfer, Marina Fokidis, General Idea, Annette Gilbert, Girls Like Us, Gloria Glitzer, Marianne Groulez, Alex Hamburger, Karl Holmqvist, Lisa Holzer, Mahmood Jamal, Tom Jennings, Ray Johnson, David Jourdan, Sharon Kivland, Kione Kochi, Kwani?, Bruce LaBruce, Tan Lin, El Lissitzky, Alessandro Ludovico, Sara MacKillop, Steve McCaffery, Jonathan Monk, Simon Morris, Mosireen, León Munoz Santini, Takashi Murakami, Deke Nihilson, Aurélie Noury, Johnny Noxzema, Clive Phillpot, Michalis Pichler, Seth Price, Riot Grrrl, Carlos Soto Román, Allen Ruppersberg, Joachim Schmid, Oliver Sieber, Paul Soulellis, Matthew Stadler, Gertrude Stein, Paul Stephens, Hito Steyerl, Mladen Stilinovic, Katja Stuke, Temporary Services, Nick Thurston, TIQQUN, Elisabeth Tonnard, V. Vale, Eric Watier, Erik van der Weijde, Lawrence Weiner, Eva Weinmayr, Jan Wenzel, Stephen Willats, Gil J Wolman, zubaan

Copublished with Miss Read: The Berlin Art Book Fair

Restricted Areas brings together the results from a nine year project looking at some of the key military bases in Eastern Germany that lie abandoned following the fall of the Iron Curtain and withdrawal of the Soviet Armed forces. For the first time, this publication includes colour images and film stills by Angus Boulton alongside comprehensive textual analysis by Simon Faulkner, John Schofield and Angela Weight. The photographs survey the varied structural and material remains representative of this legacy. The films interrogate various aspects of recent history and the Cold War, researching the visual culture of such sites and inhabiting the growing field that exists between strict documentary work and artist film and video.

Fashion is a high-impact, fast-paced industry that demands an aspirational visual message which requires constant reinvention. Graphic design for fashion must represent the core values of the brand while pushing boundaries and expectations. Often seen as a showcase for a design studios most inventive work, the seasonal nature of the end product provides a limitless testing ground for new ideas and innovative production solutions. This visually-led book contains a global selection of the best graphic design studios work for the fashion industry from packaging and lookbooks to swing tags and invitations with exclusive insights from both clients and designers. The book features not simply the visual identities of big budgets and luxury brands, but showcases the creative processes of the worlds leading design studios. With each of the four chapters printed on a different paper stock, the book itself reflects the exciting graphic developments in the field of fashion. The result is a visually diverse collection of graphic design, which is a rich source of inspiration for new and groundbreaking production techniques and a perfect reference point for those across the creative industries. Table of Contents: 1. BRANDING Acne Art Department (SE) for Acne Studios (SE) Anothercompany (NL) for Tenue de Nimes (NL) Buero NY (US) for Kai Kahune (US) Jiminie Ha (US) for Gar-De (US) Mevis & van Deursen (NL) for Viktor & Rolf (NL) MORE (CN) for ZucZug (CN) Ohlsonsmith (SE) for Van Deurs (SE) Sanderson Bob (UK) for Yutaka Tajima (UK) Stiletto (US) for threeASFOUR (US) 2. INVITATIONS Aboud Creative (UK) for Paul Smith (UK) Antoine+Manuel (FR) for Christian Lacroix (FR) Egelnick & Webb (UK) for House of Holland (UK) Hansje van Halem (NL) for Orson+Bodil (NL) John Morgan (UK) for Sinha-Stanic (UK) Karen van de Kraats (NL) for Antoine Peters (NL) Multistorey (UK) for Staerk (US) Paul Boudens (BE) for Yohji Yamamoto (JP) Paolo Bazzani (IT) for Kenzo (FR) Roanne Adams (US) for Bodkin (US) Sean Carmody (US) for Rachel Comey (US) Studio Newwork (US) for Robert Geller (US) Studio Small (UK) for Margaret Howell (UK) StudioThomson (UK) for Preen (UK) ThorbjA rn Ankerstjerne (UK) for Blaak (UK) 3. LOOKBOOKS Bluemark (JP) for Sally Scott (JP) Design Bolagent (DK) for Won Hundred (DK) Freudenthal Verhagen (NL) for Bernhard Willhelm (NL) HarrimanSteel (UK) for Eley Kishimoto (UK) Johan Hjerpe (SE) for Dianne Orving (SE) Julia Born (NL) for JOFF (NL) Manuel Raeder (DE) for BLESS (DE) Plug-in Graphic (JP) for Arts+Science (JP) Rosebud Inc (AT) for Ute Ploier (AT) Sagmeister (US) for Anni Kuan (US) Susan Barber (US) for Opening Ceremony (US) Takeshi Hamada (JP) for Adam et Rope (JP) William Hall (UK) for Mother of Pearl (UK) 4. PACKAGING Artless (JP) for Issey Miyake (JP) Homework (DK) for Fleur Tang (DK) Marque Creative (US) for Victor Alfaro (US) ThorbjA rn Ankerstjerne (UK) for Qasimi (UK)

45 graphic designers, 90 photographs, 10 years of books on contemporary art. This book is based on an invitation to graphic designers to choose two books on contemporary art from the past decade whose design they think is particularly pertinent to the content, to photograph one double-page spread from each book and, if they wish, to comment on their choices. Double Page provides a selection of recent art publications as viewed by graphic designers who are internationally known for their contribution to that field, and offers a glimpse at the role of book design today in our knowledge and understanding of contemporary art. Shedding light on this prevalent relationship between art and graphic design by means of photography, Double Page constitutes an unprecedented document of how graphic designers see the work of their peers and their own practices as an essential part of the editorial process. Contributors: Philipp Arnold, Stuart Bailey, Ludovic Balland (Typography Cabinet), Jean-Marc Ballée, Peter Bilak (Typotheque), Julia Born, Change is Good (José Albergaria & Rik Bas Backer), Jocelyn Cottencin (Lieuxcommuns), Jean-Marie Courant (Regular), Sara De Bondt, Linda van Deursen & Armand Mevis (Mevis & van Deursen), deValence (Alexandre Dimos & Gaël Étienne), Markus Dreßen (Spector), Daniel Eatock, Gavillet & Rust (Gilles Gavillet, David Rust), Christian Haas (Raffinerie AG für Gestaltung), Will Holder, Simon Josebury (Secondary Modern), Erik Kessels (KesselsKramer), Kummer & Herrman (Arthur Herrman, Jeroen Kummer), Aude Lehmann, Lehni-Trueb (Urs Lehni and Lex Trueb), Joseph Logan, Jonathan Maghen (Textfield), Mike Meiré, Maureen Mooren, Stephan Müller (Müller & Wesse), NORM (Dimitri Bruni & Manuel Krebs), Warren Olds (Studio Ahoy), Tania Prill, Alberto Vieceli (Prill & Vieceli), Purtill Family Business, Yvonne Quirmbach, Manuel Raeder, David Reinfurt (Dexter Sinister, O-R-G), Alex Rich, Georg Rutishauser, Benjamin Sommerhalder (Nieves), Christoph Steinegger (Interkool), Jon Sueda & Gail Swanlund (Stripe) Frédéric Teschner, Alexia de Visscher & Pierre Huyguebaert (Speculoos, SPRL), Markus Weisbeck, Dorothea Weishaupt (groenlandbasel), Roger Willems (Roma), Michael Worthington (Counterspace). Edited by Christophe Keller, Jérôme Saint-Loubert Bié, Catherine de Smet Graphic Design: Caroline Fabès & Joséphine Guérin with Jérôme Saint-Loubert Bié. Copublished with École régionale des Beaux-Arts de Rennes

For the last 11 years, Invideo has gathered and rendered ripe for consultation a unique legacy of video art and experimental cinema that is extraordinarily complete and admirably varied. This edition is characterized by the participation of such unexpected countries as China, Peru and Australia alongside the usual suspects, including the United States, France, Italy and Great Britain, which have a strong historical presence in this field. Also in this year’s publication are a collection of videos on the Genoa Social Forum, an English video retrospective, a debate on cinema voyeurism, a peek into the world of music videos, and many previously unseen contributions from the world of advertising and art.

“Artist Joan Jonas is one of the most groundbreaking pioneers in the fields of video and performance, having worked in these media since the 1960s. This catalogue documents her work with an interview, numerous performance and film stills, installation drawings and photographs, many of them published here for the first time.”

“L.A. Rising: SoCal Artists Before 1980” is the first comprehensive pictorial showcase of the diverse universe of artists working in the Los Angeles area during the formative period of Los Angeles’ art history. Over 800 color and 100 black and white images of work by almost 500 artists illustrate the edited texts quoted from critical reviews of exhibitions and writings of the period. Special efforts have been made to include both recognized and heretofore unsung key players in the Los Angeles art world. The book acknowledges the legacy of a full range of artists whose lives and work in Los Angeles enabled the city to become the international contemporary art capital it is today.

Contributors: Lyn Kienholz, Elizabeta Betinski, Corinne Nelson, Clinton Adams, Ron Adams, Bas Jan Ader, John Alberty, Lita Albuquerque, Anders Aldrin, Peter Alexander, Martha Alf, Neda Al-Hilali, Carlos Almaraz, John Altoon, Mabel Alvarez, Arthur Ames, Jean Goodwin Ames, Laura Anderson, Oliver Andrews, Eleanor Antin, Craig Antrim, Chuck Arnoldi, Michael Asher, David Askevold, Walter Askin, Ralph Bacerra, Don Bachardy, Jo Baer, Herman Kofi Bailey, George P. Baker, Michael Balog, John Baldessari, Jack Barth, Richmond Barthé, Joel Bass, Lynn Bassler, Robert C. Bassler, Wall Batterton, Herbert Bayer, Phoebe Beasley, Larry Bell, Billy Al Bengston, Karl Benjamin, Ed Bereal, Pat Berger, Tony Berlant, Ben Berlin, Eugene Berman, Wallace Berman, John Bernhardt, Gary Beydler, Edward Biberman, Natalie Bieser, Les Biller, Annette Bird, Streeter Blair, Sandy Bleifer, Bob and Bob, Gloria Cole Bohanen, Douglas Bond, Dorr Bothwell, David Bradford, Rex Brandt, Jerry Brane, Bettina Brendel, Michael Brewster, William Brice, Nicholas Brigante, Morris Broderson, William Theophilus Brown, Nancy Buchanan, Conrad Buff II, David Bungay, Jerry Burchfield, Jerrold Burchman, Chris Burden, Hans Burkhardt, Nathaniel Bustion, JoAnne Callis, Cameron, Greg S. Card, Elaine Carhartt, Harry Carmean, Jae Carmichael, Carol Caroompas, Barbara Carrasco, Eduardo Carrillo, Karen Carson , Bernie Casey, Elizabeth Catlett, Vija Celmins, Roberto Chavez, Carl Cheng, Judy Chicago, Grace Clements, Caron Colvin, Dan Concholar, Houston Conwill, Ron Cooper, Sister Mary Corita, Philip Cornelius, Mary Corse, Eileen Cowin, Robert Cremean, James L. Croak, Keith Crown, William Crutchfield, Robert Cumming, Darryl Curran, Dorit Cypis, Dan Cytron, Edie Danieli, Avery Danziger, Lowell Darling, Paul Darrow, Alonzo Davis, Dale B. Davis, Michael Davis, Ronald Davis, Woods Davy, Guy De Cointet, Francis de Erdely, Rupert Deese, Tony DeLap, Diane Destiny, Boris Deutsch, Charles Dickson, Richard Diebenkorn, Dietrich, Phil Dike, Guy Dill, Laddie John Dill, Paul Dillon, Morton Dimondstein, Sue Dirksen, John Divola, William Dole, James Doolin, Daniel Douke, Robert Dowd, Roy Dowell, Laurence Dreiband, Hildegarde Duane, Tom Eatherton, Bruce Edelstein, Jean Edelstein, Doug Edge, Leonard Edmondson, Melvin Edwards, Jules Engel, Marion Epting, Sam Erenberg, Merion Estes, Ned Evans, Bruce Everett, Fredericl Eversley, Connor Everts, Edgar Ewing, Martin Facey, Claire Falkenstein, Joe Fay, Lorser Feitelson, Lilly Fenichel, Jud Fine, Bruria Finkel, Max Finkelstein, Oskar Fischinger, Ethel Fisher, Judy Fiskin, Robbert Flick, Betty Davenport Ford, Llyn Foulkes, Sam Francis, Magdalena Frimkess, Michael Frimkess, Walter Gabrielson, Simone Gad, Charles Garabedian, John Garrett, Christopher Georgesco, George Geyer, James S. Gill, Shirl Goedike, Betty Gold, Judith Golden, Jack Goldstein, Joe Goode, John S. Gordon, Robert Graham, Mark Greenfield, Scott Grieger, Ron Griffin, Raul Guerrero, Allan Hacklin, Richard Haines, D.J. Hall, Frederick Hammersley, David Hammons, Lloyd Hamrol, Robert Hansen, Marvin Harden, June Harwood, Maren Hassinger, James Hayward, Wayne Alaniz Healy, Phillip Hefferton, Robert Heinecken, Victor Henderson, Maxwell Hendler, George Herms, Anthony Hernandez, Susan Lautman Hertel, Charles Christopher Hill, Gilah Yelin Hirsch, Diana Hobson, David Hockney, Patrick Hogan, Tom Holste, Varnette Honeywood, Dennis Hopper, Channa Horwitz, Bruce Houston, Bernard Hoyes, Douglas Huebler, James Hueter, Robert Irwin, Sandra Jackman, Suzanne Jackson, James Jarvaise, Connie Jenkins, Tom Jenkins, Daniel Larue Johnson, Don Johnson, Wesley Johnson, Ynez Johnston, John Paul Jones, Mary Jones, Reuben Kadish, Steve Kahn, Matsumi Kanemitsu, Allan Kaprow, Barbara Kasten, Craig Kauffman, Claude Kent, Edward Kienholz, The Kipper Kids, Gloria Kisch, Tom Knechtel, Emil Kosa Jr., Peter Krasnow, Patsy Krebs, Roger Kuntz, Suzanne Lacy, Lili Lakich, Paul Landacre, Doyle Lane, William Leavitt, Rico Lebrun, John Lees, Harold Lehman, Mark Lere, Samella Lewis, Peter Liashkov, Joyce Lightbody, Ron Linden

Contains contributions by George Brecht, Claus Bremer, Earle Brown, Joseph Bryd, John Cage, David Degener, Walter De Maria, Henry Flynt, Yoko Ono, Dick Higgins, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Terry Jennings Dennis, Ding Dong, Ray Johnson, Jackson Mac Low, Richard Maxfield, Malka Safro, Simone Forti, Nam June Paik, Terry Riley, Dieter Rot [Dieter Roth], James Waring, Emmett Williams, Christian Wolff, and La Monte Young. 2 loose sheets laid in (musical score and perforated sheet); 2 mounted envelopes plus contents (performace scores) are missing.

Born in Samoa in 1947, Richard Wentworth first came to prominence in the late 1970s along with a generation of artists whose work came to be known as New British Sculpture. By concentrating on the overlooked, and transforming and manipulating industrial or found objects into works of art, Wentworth both subverts their original function and challenges existing systems of classification. Playful, often fantastic, all his work reveals an acute intelligence allied to an irreverent and mischievous sense of humor. Leading authors from the fields of visual arts, psychology, and linguistics examine Wentworth’s interest in language, visual perception, and memory and explore his role in the history of British and international art over the last three decades.

Simon Norfolk’s 2002 book Afghanistan: chronotopia is now recognised as a classic of photography. It established Norfolk’s reputation as one of the leading photographers in the world and has been exhibited at more than thirty venues worldwide. In 2010 Simon Norfolk returned to Afghanistan. This time he followed in the footsteps of the nineteenth century Irish photographer John Burke, a superb, yet virtually unknown, war photographer. Burke’s eloquent and beautiful photographs of the Second Anglo-Afghan War (1878-1880) provide an extraordinary record. Using unwieldy wet-plate collodion negatives and huge wooden cameras he shot landscapes, battle-fields, archaeological sites, street scenes, portraits of British officers and ethnological group portraits of Afghans in what amounts to a record of an Imperial encounter. The range is tremendously broad, yet suffused with a delicate humanism. These are also amongst the first ever pictures made in Afghanistan. With this book, one hundred and thirty years too late, John Burke’s time has come at last. Norfolk’s new work looks at what happens when you add half a trillion US war dollars to an impoverished and broken country such as Afghanistan. Very loosely re-photographic in nature, the work is presented as an artistic collaboration between Burke and Norfolk. It features photographs by Burke never before published as well as Norfolk’s new pictures from Kabul and Helmand.

The traditional landscape genre was radically transformed in the 1960s when many artists stopped merely representing the land and made their mark directly in the environment. Drawn by the vast uncultivated spaces of the desert and mountain as well as post-industrial wastelands, artists such as Michael Heizer, Nancy Holt or Robert Smithson moved earth to create colossal primal symbols. Others punctuated the horizon with man-made signposts, such as Christo’s “Running Fence” or Walter de Maria’s “Lightning Field”. Journeys became works of art for Richard Long whilst Dennis Oppenheim and Ana Mendieta immersed their bodies in the contours of the land. This text traces early developments to the present day, where artists are exploring eco-systems and the interface between industrial, urban and rural cultures. Alongside photographs, sketches and project notes, Kastner compiles an archive of statements by all the featured artists alongside related texts by art historians, critics, philosophers and cultural theorists including Jean Baudrillard, Edmund Burke, Guy Debord, Michael Fried, Dave Hickey, Rosalind Krauss, Lucy R. Lippard, Thomas McEvilley, Carolyn Merchant and Simon Schama.

In this issue the idea of the object is exploded in the works of two artists with strikingly different yet subtly similar approaches to the legacies of Minimalism and Conceptualism. Since the 1960s, Lawrence Weiner has questioned artistic authority and originality eschewing images for an art “made” entirely of language. Winner of the prestigious Turner Prize in 1994, Rachel Whiteread relies on the imaginative associations of her audience, constructing a world where objects are described in terms of absences. Also in this issue, Vince Leo on Robert Frank; INSERT by Nan Goldin. Contributors include Simon Watney, Trevor Fairbrother, Lane Relya, Daniela Salvioni, Brook Adams, Neville Wakefield and more.

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