This book is the first single volume to present a complete guide to the most notorious and radical art movement of the twentieth century, the Situationist International (SI). Simon Ford offers a unique history and analysis of the SI and its main protagonists, including Guy Debord, Asger Jorn, Constant and Michele Bernstein. Tracing its development back to the European avant-garde, Ford provides a comprehensive historical background to the SI’s foundation.

Wreckers of Civilisation tells the story of two interconnected groups; the performance art group COUM Transmissions and the music group. Throbbing Gristle. The four key members of these groups were Genesis P-Orridge, Cosey Fanni Tutti, Peter Christopherson and Chris Carter. COUM shocked art audiences with their public nudity and often masochristic art actions. TG, likewise, shocked music audiences with their sonic terrorism and explicit lyrics. Wreckers of Civilistaion is a first and only book to document the work of both groups, placing it in the context of 70s notions of avantgardism and permissiveness.

More than any movement before or since, punk was defined by the poster. Excluded from TV and daytime radio, struggling to be heard in the mainstream press, posters provided an effective – and virtually free – means for bands to reach the public. This collection, which also incorporates fanzines, flyers and other ephemera, delivers a gripping snapshot of the Britain of that time, a country rife with divisions which was slowly awakening to the reality of its reduced status in the post-war world.

Out There addresses the theme of cultural marginalization – the process whereby various groups are excluded from access to and participation in the dominant culture. It engages fundamental issues raised by attempts to define such concepts as mainstream, minority, and “other,” and opens up new ways of thinking about culture and representation. All of the texts deal with questions of representation in the broadest sense, encompassing not just the visual but also the social and psychological aspects of cultural identity. Included are important theoretical writings by Homi Bhabha, Helene Cixous, Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, and Monique Wittig. Their work is juxtaposed with essays on more overtly personal themes, often autobiographical, by Gloria Anzaldua, Bell Hooks, and Richard Rodriguez, among others. This rich anthology brings together voices from many different marginalized groups – groups that are often isolated from each other as well as from the dominant culture. It joins issues of gender, race, sexual preference, and class in one forum but without imposing a false unity on the diverse cultures represented. Each piece in the book subtly changes the way every other piece is read. While several essays focus on specific issues in art, such as John Yau’s piece on Wilfredo Lam in the Museum of Modern Art, or James Clifford’s on collecting art, others draw from debates in literature, film, and critical theory to provide a much broader context than is usually found in work aimed at an art audience. Topics range from the functions of language to the role of public art in the city, from gay pornography to the meanings of black hair styles. Out There also includes essays by Rosalyn Deutsche, Richard Dyer, Kobena Mercer, Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, Gerald Vizenor and Simon Watney, as well as by the editors.

Technological optimism, even utopianism, was widespread at midcentury; in Britain, Harold Wilson in 1963 promised a new nation “forged from the white heat of the technological revolution.” In this heady atmosphere, pioneering artists transformed the cold logic of computing into a new medium for their art and played a central role in connecting technology and culture. White Heat Cold Logic tells the story of these early British digital and computer artistsóand fills in a missing chapter in contemporary art history.

In this heroic period of computer art, artists were required to build their own machines, collaborate closely with computer scientists, and learn difficult computer languages. White Heat Cold Logic’s chapters, many written by computer art pioneers themselves, describe the influence of cybernetics, with its emphasis on process and interactivity; the connections to the constructivist movement; and the importance of work done in such different venues as commercial animation, fine art schools, and polytechnics.

The advent of personal computing and graphical user interfaces in 1980 signaled the end of an era, and today we do not have so many dreams of technological utopia. And yet our highly technologized and mediated world owes much to these early practitioners, especially for expanding our sense of what we can do with new technologies.

Contributors: Roy Ascott, Stephen Bell, Paul Brown, Stephen Bury, Harold Cohen, Ernest Edmonds, Maria Fernandez, Simon Ford, John Hamilton Frazer, Jeremy Gardiner, Charlie Gere, Adrian Glew, Beryl Graham, Stan Hayward, Graham Howard, Richard Ihnatowicz, Malcolm Le Grice, Tony Longson, Brent MacGregor, George Mallen, Catherine Mason, Jasia Reichardt, Stephen A. R. Scrivener, Brian Reffin Smith, Alan Sutcliffe, Doron D. Swade, John Vince, Richard Wright, Aleksandar Zivanovic.

A Leonardo Book

“L.A. Rising: SoCal Artists Before 1980” is the first comprehensive pictorial showcase of the diverse universe of artists working in the Los Angeles area during the formative period of Los Angeles’ art history. Over 800 color and 100 black and white images of work by almost 500 artists illustrate the edited texts quoted from critical reviews of exhibitions and writings of the period. Special efforts have been made to include both recognized and heretofore unsung key players in the Los Angeles art world. The book acknowledges the legacy of a full range of artists whose lives and work in Los Angeles enabled the city to become the international contemporary art capital it is today.

Contributors: Lyn Kienholz, Elizabeta Betinski, Corinne Nelson, Clinton Adams, Ron Adams, Bas Jan Ader, John Alberty, Lita Albuquerque, Anders Aldrin, Peter Alexander, Martha Alf, Neda Al-Hilali, Carlos Almaraz, John Altoon, Mabel Alvarez, Arthur Ames, Jean Goodwin Ames, Laura Anderson, Oliver Andrews, Eleanor Antin, Craig Antrim, Chuck Arnoldi, Michael Asher, David Askevold, Walter Askin, Ralph Bacerra, Don Bachardy, Jo Baer, Herman Kofi Bailey, George P. Baker, Michael Balog, John Baldessari, Jack Barth, Richmond Barthé, Joel Bass, Lynn Bassler, Robert C. Bassler, Wall Batterton, Herbert Bayer, Phoebe Beasley, Larry Bell, Billy Al Bengston, Karl Benjamin, Ed Bereal, Pat Berger, Tony Berlant, Ben Berlin, Eugene Berman, Wallace Berman, John Bernhardt, Gary Beydler, Edward Biberman, Natalie Bieser, Les Biller, Annette Bird, Streeter Blair, Sandy Bleifer, Bob and Bob, Gloria Cole Bohanen, Douglas Bond, Dorr Bothwell, David Bradford, Rex Brandt, Jerry Brane, Bettina Brendel, Michael Brewster, William Brice, Nicholas Brigante, Morris Broderson, William Theophilus Brown, Nancy Buchanan, Conrad Buff II, David Bungay, Jerry Burchfield, Jerrold Burchman, Chris Burden, Hans Burkhardt, Nathaniel Bustion, JoAnne Callis, Cameron, Greg S. Card, Elaine Carhartt, Harry Carmean, Jae Carmichael, Carol Caroompas, Barbara Carrasco, Eduardo Carrillo, Karen Carson , Bernie Casey, Elizabeth Catlett, Vija Celmins, Roberto Chavez, Carl Cheng, Judy Chicago, Grace Clements, Caron Colvin, Dan Concholar, Houston Conwill, Ron Cooper, Sister Mary Corita, Philip Cornelius, Mary Corse, Eileen Cowin, Robert Cremean, James L. Croak, Keith Crown, William Crutchfield, Robert Cumming, Darryl Curran, Dorit Cypis, Dan Cytron, Edie Danieli, Avery Danziger, Lowell Darling, Paul Darrow, Alonzo Davis, Dale B. Davis, Michael Davis, Ronald Davis, Woods Davy, Guy De Cointet, Francis de Erdely, Rupert Deese, Tony DeLap, Diane Destiny, Boris Deutsch, Charles Dickson, Richard Diebenkorn, Dietrich, Phil Dike, Guy Dill, Laddie John Dill, Paul Dillon, Morton Dimondstein, Sue Dirksen, John Divola, William Dole, James Doolin, Daniel Douke, Robert Dowd, Roy Dowell, Laurence Dreiband, Hildegarde Duane, Tom Eatherton, Bruce Edelstein, Jean Edelstein, Doug Edge, Leonard Edmondson, Melvin Edwards, Jules Engel, Marion Epting, Sam Erenberg, Merion Estes, Ned Evans, Bruce Everett, Fredericl Eversley, Connor Everts, Edgar Ewing, Martin Facey, Claire Falkenstein, Joe Fay, Lorser Feitelson, Lilly Fenichel, Jud Fine, Bruria Finkel, Max Finkelstein, Oskar Fischinger, Ethel Fisher, Judy Fiskin, Robbert Flick, Betty Davenport Ford, Llyn Foulkes, Sam Francis, Magdalena Frimkess, Michael Frimkess, Walter Gabrielson, Simone Gad, Charles Garabedian, John Garrett, Christopher Georgesco, George Geyer, James S. Gill, Shirl Goedike, Betty Gold, Judith Golden, Jack Goldstein, Joe Goode, John S. Gordon, Robert Graham, Mark Greenfield, Scott Grieger, Ron Griffin, Raul Guerrero, Allan Hacklin, Richard Haines, D.J. Hall, Frederick Hammersley, David Hammons, Lloyd Hamrol, Robert Hansen, Marvin Harden, June Harwood, Maren Hassinger, James Hayward, Wayne Alaniz Healy, Phillip Hefferton, Robert Heinecken, Victor Henderson, Maxwell Hendler, George Herms, Anthony Hernandez, Susan Lautman Hertel, Charles Christopher Hill, Gilah Yelin Hirsch, Diana Hobson, David Hockney, Patrick Hogan, Tom Holste, Varnette Honeywood, Dennis Hopper, Channa Horwitz, Bruce Houston, Bernard Hoyes, Douglas Huebler, James Hueter, Robert Irwin, Sandra Jackman, Suzanne Jackson, James Jarvaise, Connie Jenkins, Tom Jenkins, Daniel Larue Johnson, Don Johnson, Wesley Johnson, Ynez Johnston, John Paul Jones, Mary Jones, Reuben Kadish, Steve Kahn, Matsumi Kanemitsu, Allan Kaprow, Barbara Kasten, Craig Kauffman, Claude Kent, Edward Kienholz, The Kipper Kids, Gloria Kisch, Tom Knechtel, Emil Kosa Jr., Peter Krasnow, Patsy Krebs, Roger Kuntz, Suzanne Lacy, Lili Lakich, Paul Landacre, Doyle Lane, William Leavitt, Rico Lebrun, John Lees, Harold Lehman, Mark Lere, Samella Lewis, Peter Liashkov, Joyce Lightbody, Ron Linden

Noted music producer and scholar Pat Thomas spent five years in Oakland, CA researching Listen, Whitey! The Sounds of Black Power 1965-1975. While befriending members of the Black Panther Party, Thomas discovered rare recordings of speeches, interviews, and music by noted activists Huey Newton, Bobby Seale, Eldridge Cleaver, Elaine Brown, The Lumpen and many others that form the framework of this definitive retrospective. Listen, Whitey! also chronicles the forgotten history of Motown Records.

From 1970 to 1973, Motown’s Black Power subsidiary label, Black Forum, released politically charged albums by Stokely Carmichael, Amiri Baraka, Langston Hughes, Bill Cosby & Ossie Davis, and many others, all represented. Also explored are the musical connections between Bob Dylan, John Lennon, Graham Nash, the Partridge Family (!?!) and the Black Power movement. Obscure recordings produced by SNCC, Ron Karenga’s US, the Tribe and other African-American sociopolitical organizations of the late 1960s and early ’70s are examined along with the Isley Brothers, Nina Simone, Archie Shepp, Art Ensemble of Chicago, Clifford Thornton, Watts Prophets, Last Poets, Gene McDaniels, Roland Kirk, Horace Silver, Angela Davis, H. Rap Brown, Stanley Crouch, and others that spoke out against oppression.

Other sections focus on Black Consciousness poetry (from the likes of Jayne Cortez, wife of Ornette Coleman), inspired religious recordings that infused god and Black Nationalism, obscure regional and privately pressed Black Power 7-inch soul singles from across America. 90,000 words of text are accompanied by over 250 large sized, full-color reproductions of album covers and 45 rpm singles ó most of which readers will have never seen before.

Published on the occasion of Rene Burri’s 65th birthday, this volume presents a selection of many previously unpublished images by the renowned Magnum photographer. Photographs by Burri; story by Barry Gifford on brown-stock paper. 72 pages; 54 full-page duo-toned b&w plates + 2 text illustrations; 8.75 x 11.75 inches. From a numbered edition limited to 3000 copies. Text in English.

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