The first career-spanning catalog of the work of Gianfranco Gorgoni, whose iconic photographs established Land Art as one of the major art movements of the twentieth century. For five decades, photographer Gianfranco Gorgoni (1941-2019) built his reputation as the premier documentarian of Land Art in the US and beyond. After leaving Italy, Gorgoni started making portraits of the major artists of the New York scene, including Michael Heizer, Robert Smithson, Nancy Holt, Walter De Maria, Carl Andre, and Richard Serra.   It was not long before he was traveling with Heizer, Smithson, and De Maria to the American West in the late 1960s to plot the works that would famously break art practice out of the confines of the gallery world. In Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah, these artists embarked on major Land Art installations that would redefine contemporary art practice of the era. In many cases, Gorgoni was the only photographer on the ground to document their projects, and his images often serve as the definitive photographic record of the planning and creation of these groundbreaking works. Published to coincide with the first major exhibition of Gorgoni’s photographic Land Art images at the Nevada Museum of Art, featuring over fifty of his large-scale photographs, Gianfranco Gorgoni: Land Art Photographs includes an introduction by Ann M. Wolfe, Andrea and John C. Deane Family senior curator and deputy director at the Nevada Museum of Art, an essay by the late art historian and critic Germano Celant, whose contribution here is among the last he wrote before his death in 2020, and William L. Fox, the Peter E. Pool Director of the Center for Art + Environment.   A landmark collection of photographs of legendary and lesser-known works by Michael Heizer, Walter De Maria, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Richard Serra, Robert Smithson, Ugo Rondinone, and Charles Ross, Gianfranco Gorgoni: Land Art Photographs is a major new assessment of one of the world’s great art movements.

There is a twisted steel dome in Hiroshima that stands as a grim reminder of the city’s destruction by the first atomic bomb. Halfway around the globe, on the border of Utah and Nevada, stands another ruin. The site that housed the bomber that carried “Little Boy,” Wendover Army Air Base, now crumbles from neglect. The stories and relics of Wendover describe more than just the past; they point to a historic cycle, a present increasingly filled with new threats of devastating nuclear and chemical warfare. For this book, American photographer Mark Klett (born 1952) has teamed up with William L. Fox, a celebrated science and art writer whose work focuses on human cognition and memory. Together, the two have created a fascinating visual and textual portrait of Wendover Army Air Base, examining the experience of memory in relation to the great tragedy of America’s atomic age.

The fields of photography and architecture have long been closely linked: photography provides a powerful way for architecture to be appreciated from a distance, and the camera lens alters and enhances buildings so that they can be appreciated anew, even by those already intimately familiar with them. Concrete: Photography and Architecture explores this deep and often complex relationship, with particular attention paid not only to how photography influences the perception of architecture but also the very design itself. Beginning with the invention of photography in the nineteenth century, this volume presents iconic images of urban architecture and townscapes that are organized thematically rather than simply chronologically. The editors have assembled over two hundred images from numerous notable photographers, including: Georg Aerni, Adolphe Braun, Balthasar Burkhard, Lynn Cohen, Walker Evans, Lucien Hervé, Germaine Krull, Stanley Kubrick, Hiroshi Sugimoto, and William Henry Fox Talbot. Originally published to coincide with an exhibition celebrating the Fotomuseum Winterthur’s twentieth anniversary, Concrete: Photography and Architecture is an exhaustive investigation of architectural photography and is as beautiful as it is informative.  

Exhibition catalogue published in conjunction with show held in July 1971. Organized by Jorge Glusberg. Artists include Vito Acconci, Eleanor Antin, Arakawa, Sue Arrowsmith, David Askevold, Walter Ave, John Baldessari, Manuel Barbadillo, Robert Barry, Otto Beckmann, Luis Benedit, Mel Bochner, Christian Boltanski, Ian Breakwell, Eugen Brikcius, Stuart Brisley, Stanley Brouwn, Donald Burgy, Don Celender, Jürgen Claus, James Collins, Christo, Agnes Denes, Mirtha Dermisache, Antonio Dias, Geniy Dignac, Gregorio Dujovny, David Dye, Stano Filko, Barry Flanagan, Terry Fox, Dr. Herbert Franke, Ken Friedman, Hamish Fulton, Nicolás Garcia Uriburu, Jochen Gerz, Gilbert & George, Carlos Ginzburg, Jorge González Mir, Dan Graham, Víctor Grippo, Klaus Groh, Hans Haacke, Olaf Hanel, Rafael Hastings, Douglas Huebler, Peter Hutchinson, Alain Jacquet, Richards Jarden, Allan Kaprow, On Kawara, Michael Kirby, Alain Kirili, Dusan Klimes, J.H. Kocman, Joseph Kosuth, Uzi Kotler, Christie Kozlov, Alexis Rafael Krasilovsky, Josef Kroutvor, Peter Kuttner, David Lamelas, John Latham, Auro Lecci, Les Levine, Richard Long, Lea Lublin, Jorge de Luján Gutiérrez, Mario Mariño, Vicente Marotta, Charles Mattox, Mario Merz, Mauricio Nannucci, Georg Nees, Dennis Oppenheim, Marie Orensanz, Luis Pazos, Alberto Pellegrino, Alfredo Portillos, Juan Pablo Renzi, Dorothea Rockburne, Juan Carlos Romero, Edward Ruscha, Bernardo Salcedo, Jean Michel Sanéjouand, Richard Serra, Petr Stembera, Clorindo Testa, Antonio Trotta, Timm Ulrichs, Franco Vaccari, Jiri Valoch, John van Saun, Bernar Venet, Edgardo Antonio Vigo, Lawrence Weiner, Ian Wilson, Robert Wittmann, William Woodrow and Gilberto Zorio. Includes biographies of the artists. Text in English and Spanish.

Hans-Ulrich Obrist once organized a science and art conference with all of the infrastructure of a conference–the parties, chats, lunches, airport arrivals–but with no actual conference. Apparently it was hugely successful and spawned many ongoing collaborations.~This tale is told by Bruce Mau in the introduction to Bridge the Gap?, the printed result of an evolving conference that looks at the increasing interest in science demonstrated in the work of many contemporary artists, architects and designers, as well as by thinkers in the humanities. Included are texts by Marina Abramovic, Arima Akito, are you meaning company, Oladélé A. Bamgboyé, Stefano Boeri, John Casti, Gregory J. Chaitin, Chang Yung-Ho, Olafur Eliasson, Cerith Wyn Evans, Liam Gillick, Joseph Grigely, Carsten Höller, Hsia Chu-Joe, Ikegami Takashi, Evelyn Fox Keller, Rem Koolhaas, Kunitake Toyoki, Sarat Maharaj, Mogi Ken’ichiro, Sanford Kwinter, Mark Leonard, William Lim, Ken Lum, Jeff Preiss, Israel Rosenfield, Saskia Sassen, Luc Steels, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Wang Jian-Wei and Anton Zeilinger, plus a musical project on audio CD by Pipilotti Rist and Anders Guggisberg. Edited by Hans-Ulrich Obrist and Miyake Akiko. Paperback, 8.5 x 6.75 in./551 pgs / 608 color 10 BW0 duotone 0 DVD~ Item D20350

This catalog, produced in conjunction with Sugimoto’s upcoming exhibition at the Izu Photo Museum in Japan, documents this important artist’s recent investigations on the science and the presentation of photography. Documenting in detail Sugimoto’s architectural and landscape design of the new Izu Photo Museum, the book is at once a reinvention of the artist as architect, as it is an insightful guide to Sugimoto’s interest in the earliest beginnings of photography. Instigated by the urging of his friend, Pop art icon Richard Hamilton, Sugimoto went to England to visit the museum of William Henry Fox Talbot, the inventor of the negative/positive photographic process. Finding common ground with Talbots’ polymathic interests in art and science, this book details images from Sugimoto’s Photogenic Drawing Talbot pieces, where Sugimoto reinterprets 15 unprinted negatives from Talbot’s early studies, as well as 15 images from the artist’s Lightning Field series. Includes text by critic Minoru Shimizu.

Interviews with Nauman and Terry Fox; Klaus Rinke, Retrospective; Documents featuring John van Saun, Dennis Oppenheim, Richard Serra; “Yves Klein,” by Shunk-Kender; “King for a Day,” by Bruce McLean; “112 Greene Street”; “Mrs. Burke, I thought you were dead,” by William Wegman; “Drifts and Conversations,” by Vito Acconci and “A Discussion with Acconci, Fox and Oppenheim.”

Emily Dickinson’s poems stand alone in the English language in their severe yet wild shapeliness and unhindered dexterity of thought. In Earths Grow Thick, the American artist Roni Horn put those poems–or lines from them–to new uses, incorporating her words in a series of austere, stick-like sculptures. Horn makes similar use of William Blake, but her sympathy with the work of Dickinson is clear, and results in a beautiful form or word sculpture. This handsome catalogue is published in conjunction with the first exhibition to present the four bodies of Horn’s work comprising the Dickinson sculptures. The illustrations are complemented by texts ranging from Judith Fox’s interview with Horn to bell hooks’ intimate recollections of her childhood introduction to Dickinson’s work.

A very Playboy look at the youth/counter culture of 1971. Interviews on the drug revolution with William S. Burroughs, a candid conversation with Peter Fonda, the new commix culture started by R. Crumb’s Zap, biographical articles on Johnny Cash, Janis Joplin and Mick Jagger, as well as Shel Silverstein’s take on hippies, fiction by Joyce Carol Oates and the usual batch of articles, cartoons (John Dempsey & Little Annie fanny), pictorial essays, pretty girls in the altogether and interviews. Interview Peter Fonda by Lawrence Linderman. Articles “On His Way to Epley’s Bike Shop Charley Meets a Girl with Twelve Dogs” by James D. Houston. “Sexus Perplexus” by John Dempsey. “West of Eden” by Jules Siegel. The No-Bra Look Photographed by Douglas Kirkland. Model Gloria Root photographed by Pompeo Posar. Drugs Playboy Panel “The Drug Revolution” Panelists Joel Fort John Finlator Baba Ram Dass Harry J. Anslinger Joseph S. Oteri Alan Watts William S. Burroughs Leslie Fiedler James Coburn Articles “Dance With a Stranger” by Jacob Brackman. “Silverstein Among the Hippies” by Shel Silverstein. Model Debbie Hooper. Music Personalities “Head Stone: Jagger” by Alan Coren. “All She Needs is Love: (Janice) Joplin” by John Bowers. “Good Ole Boy: (Johnny) Cash” by Saul Braun. Articles “Alice & Ray & Yesterday’s Flowers” by Saul Braun. The Girls of Hair Florence Rollin Donna Lee Shelley Plimpton Lyvia Bauer Jutta Weinhold Hanny Kirchhoff Carolyn Blakely Leata Galloway Betty Berr Elisabeth Berger Lynn Kellogg Ghristine Guenther Vanina Michel Alica Ottawa Sally Eaton Gayle Hayden Corinne Broskett Model Jennifer Liano. Politics Personality “Portrait of the Marxist as an Old Trouper” (F. Ambrose Clark) by Michael Horowitz. Articles “Revolution” by Jules Siegel. “Counterrevolution” by George Fox. “Saul Bird Says: Relate! Communicate! Liberate!” by Joyce Carol Oates. “The International Comix Conspiracy” by Jacob Brackman. “The Chicago Conspiracy Circus” by Nicholas von Hoffman. Models Vicky Drake photographed by Dick Rowan Gale Olson

Ryan Gander: Catalogue Raisonnable Vol. 1″ was conceived by Åbäke as a “reasonable alternative” to a catalogue raisonné for the artist (i.e. a monograph giving a comprehensive and exhaustive catalogue of artworks by an artist). Documenting over 500 works made during a ten-year period, the “Catalogue Raisonnable” is intended to be navigated freely and illogically, in a non-linear fashion by its reader, echoing the “para-possible thinking” and “associative methodologies” on which much of Gander’s practice is based. For those readers who wish to draw some logic from its content, it is suggested that the book is navigated through its index. The “Catalogue Raisonnable” consists of two sections. The first is a complete index/catalogue of the artist’s practice, while the second is made up from a collage of by-products, off-cuts, transcriptions, scripts, conversations, and material related to the works in the index. The publication includes texts by Douglas Fogle, Dan Fox, Christophe Gallois, Ian Gander, Emily King, Raimundas Malašauskas, Midori Matsui, Hans Ulrich Obrist, François Piron, Dorothea Strauss, and Bedwyr Williams, among others. The publication “Ryan Gander: Catalogue Raisonnable Vol. 1” has been co-published by Westreich/Wagner Publications on the occasion of the exhibition “Ryan Gander—Zurich Art Prize Winner 2009” at Haus Konstruktiv, Zurich.

Artists: Marina Abramovic, Carmen Almon, Luiz Alphonsus, Ben d’Armagnac, John M. Armleder, Conrad Atkinson, Christian Ludwig Attersee, Alice Aycock, Lewis Baltz, Jack Barth, Jennifer Bartlett, Lynda Benglis, Jaap Berghuis, Mari Boeyen, Michal Bogucki, Christian Boltanski, Hans Brosch, Ian Carr-Harris, Luciano Castelli, Louis Chacallis, Pinchas Cohen-Gan, Paolo Cotani, Groupe Coum, Michael Craig-Martin, Gerrit Dekker, Martin Disler, Goran Djordjevic, Noel Dolla, Ugo Dossi, Juan Downey, Michael Druks, Markus Duik, David Dye, Pablo Echaurren, I.R.G., Bob Evans, Valie Export, Helmut Federle, John C. Fernie, Guy Fihman, Barry Flanagan, Emil Forman, Terry Fox, Hermine Freed, Iole de Fretas, Kazumichi Fujiwara, Marie-Louise de Geer-Bergenstrahle, Andreas Gehr, Wim Gijzen, Marcia Giluly, Gary-John Glaser, Gyula Gulyas, Nigel Hall, Jene Highstein, Naoyoshi Hikosaka, Hans van Hoek, Alain d’Hooghe, Rebecca Horn, Pierre Alain Hubert, Vivien Isnard, Bernard Joubert, Etsutomu Kashihara, Theatre Kassaknak, Pierre Keller, Nancy Kitchel, Wolf Knoebel, Rob van Koningsbruggen, Miloslav Laky, Darcy Lange, Terence-David LaNoue, Kang-So Lee, Barbara et Michael Leisgen, Barbara Linkevitch, Natalia LL Permato, Bernd Lohaus, Jeffrey Lowe, Urs Luthy, Groupe Lyn, Renato Maestri, Tim Mapston, Bill Martin, Gordon Matta-Clark, Anthony McCall, Ronald Michaelson, Samuel Montealegre, Miloslav Mucha, Gregoire Muller, Antonio Muntadas, Tsuneo Nakai, Hitoshi Nomura, Jacques Louis Nyst, Anna Opperman, Bernard Pages, Friederike Pezold, Walter Pfeiffer, Jean-Pierre Pincemin, Howardena D. Pindell, Fabrizio Plessi, Litiana Porter, Ulrike Rosenbach, Martin Rous, Moon-Seup Shim, Alex Silber, Charles Simonds, Alan Sonfist, Keith Sonnier, Judith Stein, John Setzaker, Ben Sveinsson, Kyoji Takubo, Gage Taylor, Olivier Thorme, Francesc Torres, Andre Valensi, Jean-Louis Vila, Hanna Villiger, William Viola, Tetsuya Watanabe, van de Wint, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Troels Worsel, Jan Zavarsky, Michele Zaza

When recession-plagued New York City abandoned its industrial base in the 1970s, performance artists, photographers, and filmmakers found their own mixed uses for the city’s run-down lofts, abandoned piers, vacant lots, and deserted streets. Gordon Matta-Clark turned a sanitation pier into the celebrated work Day’s End and Betsy Sussler filmed its making; the photographic team Shunk-Kender shot a vast series of images of Willoughby Sharp’s Projects: Pier 18 (which included work by Vito Acconci, Mel Bochner, Dan Graham, Matta-Clark, and William Wegman, among others); and Cindy Sherman staged some of her Untitled Film Stills on the streets of Lower Manhattan. Mixed Use, Manhattan documents and illustrates these projects as well as more recent work by artists who continue to engage with the city’s public, underground, and improvised spaces. The book (which accompanies a major exhibition) focuses on several important photographic series: Peter Hujar’s 1976 nighttime photographs of Manhattan’s West Side; Alvin Baltrop’s Hudson River pier photographs from 1975-1985, most of which have never before been shown or published; David Wojnarowicz’s Rimbaud in New York (1978-1979), the first of Wojnarowicz’s works to be published; and several of Zoe Leonard’s photographic projects from the late 1990s on. The book includes 70 color and 130 black-and-white images, a chronology of the policy decisions and developments that altered the face of New York City from 1950 to the present; an autobiographical story by David Wojnarowicz; and essays by Johanna Burton, Lytle Shaw, Juan Suarez, and the exhibition’s curators, Lynne Cooke and Douglas Crimp. Artist included: Alvin Baltrop, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Dara Birnbaum, Jennifer Bolande, Stefan Brecht, Matthew Buckingham, Tom Burr, Roy Colmer, Moyra Davey, Terry Fox, William Gedney, Bernard Guillot, David Hammons, Sharon Hayes, Peter Hujar, Joan Jonas, Louise Lawler, Zoe Leonard, Sol LeWitt, Glenn Ligon, Robert Longo, Vera Lutter, Danny Lyon, Babette Mangolte, Gordon Matta-Clark, Steve McQueen, John Miller, Donald Moffett, James Nares, Max Neuhaus, Catherine Opie, Gabriel Orozco, Barbara Probst, Emily Roysdon, Cindy Sherman, Harry Shunk & Janos Kender, Charles Simonds, Thomas Struth, James Welling, David Wojnarowicz, and Christopher Wool

In October 1993, Henry M. Buhl purchased a photograph by Alfred Stieglitz of Georgia O’Keeffe’s hands. This photograph would come to be the cornerstone of a private collection that now includes over one thousand images by the medium’s foremost practitioners as well as little-known and emerging artists. Focusing on the theme of the hand, Buhl has gathered images spanning the history of photography, from a photogenic drawing negative made in 1840 by William Henry Fox Talbot to serial Polaroids made in 2002 by Cornelia Parker. The collection also encompasses a comprehensive range of photographic practices, including scientific, journalistic, and fine-art photography, with a strong component of contemporary art. Published on the occasion of a major exhibition drawn from The Buhl Collection, this book demonstrates the prevalence of the hand as a photographic theme, a result, in part, of photography’s easy ability to capture fragments and detail, as well as ephemeral movement. The selected works depict the hand literally, in the context of portraiture, for example, as well as figuratively, in terms of the poetic emphasis given to hand gestures in documentary images. In artistic images created from the 1920s to the present, the hand is abstracted and subsequently treated as a conceptual device. Jennifer Blessing explores the nature of collecting photographs and why hands are in many ways a uniquely photographic theme. Kirsten A. Hoving emphasizes the prevalence of hands in Surrealist photographs and prose. Ralph Rugoff discusses the uncanny aspects of hands in contemporary art that uses photography. The catalogue entries, written by Matthew S. Witkovsky with Melanie Mariño and Nat Trotman, cover 150 artists and 168 works, forming a useful resource for the study of the history of photography.

Catalogue for an exhibition exploring how photographers deal with ideas of mortality and the taboos which surround picturing the dead. Includes work by Nobuyoshi Araki, Sue Fox, Kasimir Zgorecki, Franco Zecchin, Thomas Werde, Belinda Whiting, Rudolph Schafer, Leslie Hakim-Dowek, Krass Clement, Donigan Cumming, Hans Danuser, Louis Jammes, Max Jourdan, Pete Max Kandhola, Ann Mandelbaum, Bastienne Schmidt, Andres Serrano, John Benjamin Stone, Clare Strand, Annet van der Voort, Nick Waplington, Elizabeth Williams, Neil Winokur, and Xavier Zimbardo. Curated with essays by Val Williams and Greg Hobson; essays by Elizabeth Edwards and Thomas Lynch

Imagining Paradise is the first book to showcase the treasures of The George Eastman House’s incomparable Richard and Ronay Menschel Library. It features over 250 rare books, each beautifully illustrated here and accompanied by commentary from prominent scholars. A large and handsome volume itself, as befits its subject, it ranges over the history of the medium of photography, its practitioners and its processes–from bucolic landscapes, to travel and exploration, science and medicine, the literary and the illustrious. It encompasses the incunabula of William Henry Fox Talbot through the reveries of Maxime Du Camp and Francis Frith; the vision of Peter Henry Emerson to Alfred Stieglitz’s Camera Work and 291; and the exceptional published and unpublished books by Alvin Langdon Coburn. It documents works illustrated with tipped-in original salt prints, albumen prints, platinum prints, photogravures, carbon prints, collotypes and Woodburytypes. It includes translations in five languages of Louis Jacques Mandé Daguerre’s seminal instructional manual describing the daguerreotype process and works of great and unusual beauty, such as a red leather, bronze-trimmed Bible, illustrated in the 1860s with 56 photographs by Francis Frith. No other library in the world holds this breadth and depth of the history, aesthetics and technology of photography and no other book can bring them so thoroughly into the reader’s hands. This exceptional collection of rare books was formed from the Eastman Historical Photographic Collection of the Kodak Company, which encompassed the collections of many of the most important photographic scientists, historians and collectors in the world.

Photography has a unique relationship to chance. Anyone who has wielded a camera has taken a picture ruined by an ill-timed blink or enhanced by an unexpected gesture or expression. Although this proneness to chance may amuse the casual photographer, Robin Kelsey points out that historically it has been a mixed blessing for those seeking to make photographic art. On the one hand, it has weakened the bond between maker and picture, calling into question what a photograph can be said to say. On the other hand, it has given photography an extraordinary capacity to represent the unpredictable dynamism of modern life. By delving into these matters, Photography and the Art of Chance transforms our understanding of photography and the work of some of its most brilliant practitioners.

The effort to make photographic art has involved a call and response across generations. From the introduction of photography in 1839 to the end of the analog era, practitioners such as William Henry Fox Talbot, Julia Margaret Cameron, Alfred Stieglitz, Frederick Sommer, and John Baldessari built upon and critiqued one another’s work in their struggle to reconcile aesthetic aspiration and mechanical process. The root problem was the technology’s indifference, its insistence on giving a bucket the same attention as a bishop and capturing whatever wandered before the lens. Could such an automatic mechanism accommodate imagination? Could it make art? Photography and the Art of Chance reveals how daring innovators expanded the aesthetic limits of photography to create art for a modern world.

500 superb images represent the world’s best photographers and encompass every sort of photography in this eye-catching and engrossing book. Pictures of famous events such as the Royal Wedding and the first landing on the moon are here, next to familiar shots by masters of photography such as Bill Brandt, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Cecil Beaton and Robert Doisneau. There is fashion, sport, natural history, reportage and society portraiture, as well as social documentary and art. The 500 photographers featured range from William Henry Fox Talbot and Julia Margaret Cameron to Larry Clarke and Herb Rittz, from Robert Capa and Josef Koudelka to Nan Goldin and Pierre et Gilles. Arranged alphabetically by photographer, each full-page image is accompanied by an illuminating text which gives a useful insight into the work and its creator, as well as extensive cross-references to others working in the same field or the same style. Glossaries of technical terms and movements and a directory of museums and galleries are included to provide a fully comprehensive and self-contained volume.

A must-have for all lovers of classic nature photography. Just as French scientist Etienne-Jules Marey first invented a photographic gun to shoot images of flying birds in rapid sequence, so too have many other photographers drawn analogies between hunting and shooting a camera. The title takes its name from a publication by the British photography pioneer William Henry Fox Talbot (1800 1877). In the original Pencil of Nature, widely considered the first photo book, Talbot referred to photography as a way of taking portraits that are self- drawn in light. For Manabu Miyazaki, known in his native Japan as the photojournalist of the natural world, images of uncannily humanistic animals act as mirrors of a contemporary society grown distant from nature. In Miyazaki s case, however, it is the animals themselves who do the shooting. Unmanned cameras, equipped with infrared sensors, shine a spotlight on wild animals hidden by the veil of the forest when animals trip a sensor, they trigger the camera lens, resulting in breathtaking, unstaged shots. Miyazaki s unusual photographic equipment, documented in a fascinating photographic index, is an assemblage of various everyday items and parts what Claude LÃ vi-Strauss called a bricolage. Examples include a waterproof strobe encased in PVC piping, a camera with a homemade electrical coil to prevent the fogging of the lens, and a waterproof cover for an infrared sensor made from a Tupperware container. This publication accompanies the Izu Photo Museum s remarkable 40-year retrospective of Miyazaki s work. The book encompasses the artist s major series, beginning with Animal Trails and including Eagles and Hawks, Ural Owls, Death in Nature, Animal Apocalypse and Persimmon Tree. With an introduction and artist interview by essayist Masashi Kohara.

Band 1: malerei, plastik, performance.- Band 2: fotografie film video.- Band 3: handzeichnungen, utopisches design, bücher.- Artsts: Berenice Abbott, Hermann Albert, Carl Andre, Ben d’Armagnac, Christian Ludwig Attersee, Vito Acconci, Pierre Alechinsky, Theo Angelopoulos, Arman (Armand Fernandez), Bernhard Aubertin, Valerio Adami, Gerhard Altenbourg, Ottomar Anschütz, Fernando Arrabal, Joannis Avramidis, Robert Adamson, Robert Altman, Horst Antes, Eduardo Arroyo, Alice Aycock, Peter Ackermann, Anatol, Ant Farm, Art & Language, Billy Adler, Gisela Andersch, Shusaku Arakawa, David Askevold, Chantal Akerman, Laurie Anderson, Diane Arbus, Eugène Atget, Francis Bacon, Monika Baumgartl, Joseph Beuys, Fernando Botero, Kevin Brownlow & Andrew Mollo, Michael Badura, Hippolyte Bayard, Michael von Biel, Margaret Bourke-White, Günter Brus, Eduard Denis Baldús, Thomas Bayrle, Werner Bischof, Mathew B. Brady, Anatol Brosilowsky, Balthus, Cecil Beaton, Louis-Auguste Bisson & Auguste-Rosalie Bisson, Brassaï (Gyula Halász), Wojciech Bruszewski, Joachim Bandau, Bernd e Hilla Becher, Irma Blanck, George Brecht, Luis Buñuel, Jared Bark, Stephan Beck, Karl Blossfeldt, KP Brehmer, Chris Burden, Robert Barry, Bill Beckley, Bernhard Blume, George Hendrik Breitner, Daniel Buren, Jennifer Bartlett, John Ernest Joseph Bellocq, Mel Bochner, Heinz Breloh, Scott Burton, Gianfranco Baruchello, Carmelo Bene, Peter Bogdanovich, Robert Bresson, Michael Buthe, Giorgio Batistella, Franz Bernhard, Claus Böhmler, Stuart Brisley, James Lee Byars, Gerd Baukhage, Jean-Marie Bertholin, Blythe Bohnen, Jürgen Brodwolf, Horst H. Baumann, Nuccio Bertone, Karl Bohrmann, Marcel Broodthaers, Bodo Baumgarten, Jean-Louis Bertucelli, Christian Boltanski, Stanley Brouwn, Enzo Cacciola, Robert Capa, Barbara Chase-Riboud, Pinchas Cohen-Gan, Michael Craig-Martin, Julia Margaret Cameron, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Eduardo Chillida, James Collins, Fritz Cremer, Colin Campell, Étienne Carjat, Christo, Miguel Condé, José Luis Cuevas, Peter Campus, Ugo Carrega, Chryssa, Tony Conrad, Edward Curtis, Louis Cane, Lewis Carroll, Chuck Close, Steven Cortright, Veassis Caniaris, Claude Chabrol, Harold Cohen, Claudio Costa, Miodrag Djuric (Dado), Douglas Davis, Walter De Maria, Jim Dine, Juan Downey, Louis Daguerre, Ger Dekkers, Agnes Denes, Henry + Bool Alfred + John Dixon, Peter Downsborough, Hanne Darboven, Willem de Kooning, Fred Deux, Dore O., Michael Druks, Alan Davie, Philip Henry Delamotte, Jan Dibbets, Ugo Dossi, Marcel Duchamp, John Davies, Jack Delano, Braco Dimitrijevic, Christian Dotremont, David Douglas Duncan, Don Eddy, Paul Eliasberg, Heinz Emigholz, Ulrich Erben, Walker Evans, Benni Efrat, Ger van Elk, Ed Emshwiller, Hugo Erfurth, Valie Export, Sergej Eisenstein, Peter Henry Emerson, Leo Erb, Garth Evans, Öyvind Fahlström, Federico Fellini, Dan Flavin, Charles Frazier, Lee Friedlander, Herbert Falken, Roger Fenton, Richard Fleischer, Hermine Freed, Hamish Fulton, Ralston Farina, Armand Fernandez, Lucio Fontana, Will Frenken, Heidi Fasnacht, Vincenzo Ferrari, Fred Forest, Achim Freyer, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Robert Filliou, Terry Fox, Gisèle Freund, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Wolfgang Gäfgen, Jochen Gerz, Tina Girouard, Dan Graham, Nancy Graves, Abel Gance, Paul-Armand Gette, Michael Gitlin, Eve Gramatzki, Alan Green, Alexander Gardner, Peter Gidal, Wilhelm von Gloeden, Tom J. Gramse, Marty Greenbaum, Winfred Gaul, Wolfram Giersbach, Jean-Luc Godard, Gotthard Graubner, Alberto Grifi, Rupprecht Geiger, Gilbert & George, Hubertus Gojowczyk, Nancy Graves, Robert Grosvenor, Michael Geissler, Frank Gilette, Kuno Gonschior, Walter Grasskamp, Hetum Gruber, Arnold Genthe, Raimund Girke, Camille Graeser, Gotthard Graubner, Renato Guttuso, Roel D’Haese, Haus-Rucker-Co, Wilhelm Hein, Lewis Hine, Nan Hoover, Helfried Hagenberg, Erich Hauser, Bernhard Heisig, Leon Hirszman, Rebecca Horn, David Hall, Lady Hawarden, Michael Heizer, Antonius Höckelmann, Horst P. Horst, Nigel Hall, Ron Hays, Al Held, David Hockney, George Hoyningen-Huene, Phillipe Halsman, Tim Head, Werner Herzog, Anatol Herzfeld, Alfred Hofkunst, Richard Hamilton, Erwin Heerich, Eva Hesse, Rudolf Hoflehner, Douglas Huebler, Heijo Hangen, Axel Heibel, David Octavius Hill, Edgar Hofschen, Danièle Huillet, Noriyuki Haraguchi, Birgit Hein, John Hilliard, Hans Hollein, Alfonso Hüppi, Karl Horst Hödicke, Shohei Imamura, Will Insley, Jean Ipoustéguy, Patrick Ireland, Hans Paul Isenrath, Ken Jacobs, Paul Jaray, Jasper Johns, Francis Benjamin Johnston, Miklós Jancsó, Jo Jastram, J. Douglas Johnson, Donald Judd, Horst Janssen, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Joan Jonas, Martha Jungwirth, Wolf Kahlen, Buster Keaton, Jürgen Klauke, Beril Korot, Ferdinand Kriwet, Max Kaminski, Ellsworth Kelly, Alexander Kluge, Joseph Kosuth, Germaine Krull, Howard Kanovitz, Michael Kenny, Werner Knaupp, Jannis Kounellis, Shigeko Kubota, Tadeusz Kantor, André Kertész, Günther Knipp, Andras Kovács, Stanley Kubrick, Allan Kaprow, Anselm Kiefer, Milan Knížák, Attila Kovács, Gary Kuehn, Dani Karavan, Harry Kipper, Imi Knoebel, Kurt Kren, Marin Karmitz, Alain Kirili, Alice Kochs, Dieter Krieg, Gertrude Kasebier, Ronald B. Kitaj, Christof Kohlhöfer, Richard Kriesche, On Kawara, Konrad Klapheck, Jiří Kolář, Les Krims, Willem de Kooning, László Lakner, Barry Le Va, Michael Leisgen, Lawrence Lobe, Urs Lüthi, Arthur Lamothe, Russell Lee, Les Levine, Francisco Lopez, Georg Platt Lynes, Richard Landry, Jean Le Gac, Sol LeWitt, Antonio Lopez-Garcia, Nikolaus Lang, Gustave Le Gray, Roy Lichtenstein, Joseph Losey, Dorothea Lange, Malcolm Le Grice, Richard Lindner, Bernhard Luginbühl, John Latham, Barbara Leisgen, Michael Lingner, Bernhard Lüthi, Heinz Mack, Kenneth Martin, Gerhard Merz, Alexander Mitta, Robert Morris, Nino Malfatti, Charles Marville, Mario Merz, Milan Mölzer, Alfons Maria Mucha, Felix H. Man (Hans Baumann), Roberto Matta, Borg Mesch, Bernard Moninot, Ugo Mulas, Robert Mangold, Gordon Matta-Clark, Anette Messager, Henry Moore, Antoni Muntadas, Andy Mann, Wolfgang Mattheuer, Adolphe de Meyer, Stefan Moore, Walter Murch, Werner Mantz, Cynthia Lee Maughan, Duane Michals, Carmengloria Morales, J.-J. Murphy, Piero Manzoni, Antony McCall, Henri Michaux, Marcello Morandini, Zoran Mušič, Giacomo Manzù, Barry McCallion, Rune Mields, Pit Morell, Eadweard Muybridge, Robert Mapplethorpe, Bruce McLean, Antoni Miralda, François Morellet, Brice Marden, Syd Mead, Josef Mikl, Maria Moreno, Agnes Martin, Dariush Mehrjui, Joan Miró, Malcolm Morley, Tomitaro Nachi, Bruce Nauman, Wolfgang Nestler, Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, Maria Nordman, Félix Nadar, Charles Nègre, Richard Newton, Ansgar Nierhoff, Gabriele & Helmut Nothhelfer, Maurizio Nannucci, Werner Nekes, Max Neuhaus, Richard Nonas, Lev V. Nussberg, Dore O., Timothy O’Sullivan, Roman Opalka, Nagisa Oshima, Oswald Oberhuber, Claes Oldenburg, Dennis Oppenheim, Jean Otth, Brian O’Doherty, Claudio Olivieri, Anna Oppermann, Hilmar Pabel, Giulio Paolini, A. R. Penck, Pablo Picasso, Lucio Pozzi, Nam June Paik, Eduardo Paolozzi, Peng-Wan-Ts, Otto Piene, Heinz-Günter Prager, Blinky Palermo, Gordon Parks, Beverly Pepper, Walter Pichler, Mario Prassinos, Magnus Palsson, Sergei Paradschanow, Elio Petri, Anne & Patrick Poirier, Panamarenko, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Wolfgang Petrick, Sigmar Polke, Gina Pane, Max Peintner, Friederike Pezold, Don Potts, Isabel Quintanilla, Daniel Quintero, William Raban, John Reilly, Jacob August Riis, Peter Roehr, Ed Ruscha, David Rabinowitch, James Reineking, Bridget Riley, Ulrike Rosenbach, Ken Russell, Arnulf Rainer, Albert Renger-Patzsch, Klaus Rinke, James Rosenquist, Claude Rutault, Yvonne Rainer, Jean Renoir, Larry Rivers, Francesco Rosi, Reiner Ruthenbeck, Robert Rauschenberg, Alain Resnais, Jacques Rivette, Roberto Rossellini, Robert Ryman, Man Ray, Erich Reusch, Józef Robakowski, Dieter Roth, Éric Rohmer, Tony Ray-Jones, Hans Peter Reuter, Dorothea Rockburne, Arthur Rothstein, Martial Raysse, George Warren Rickey, Alexander Rodtschenko, Gerhard Rühm, Reindeer Werk, Hans Salentin, Tomas Schmit, Eugen Schönebeck, Michael Singer, Edward Steichen, Sohrab Shadid Saless, Wolfgang Schmitz, Martin Schwarz (Künstler), Willi Sitte, Saul Steinberg, Erich Salomon, Helmut Schober, Martin Scorsese, Neal Slavin, Frank Stella, Lucas Samaras, Eugen Schönebeck, George Segal, David Smith, Alfred Stieglitz, Fred Sandback, Ben Schonzeit, Antonio Seguí, Robert Smithson, Sir Benjamin Stone, August Sander, Rudolf Schoofs, Friedrich Seidenstücker, Fernando Ezequiel Solanas, Paul Strand, Sarkis Zabunyan, Jan Schoonhoven, Richard Serra, Michael Snow, Jean-Marie Straub, Antonio Saura, Werner Schroeter, Ben Shahn, Alan Sonfist, Liselotte Strelow, Konrad Balder Schäuffelen, Heinz Schubert, Joel Shapiro, Eve Sonneman, Michell Stuart, Georgij Schengalaja, Alf Schuler, Charles Sheeler, Keith Sonnier, Josef Sudek, Alexander Schleber, HA Schult, Stephen Shore, Daniel Spoerri, István Szábo, Barbara Schmidt-Heins, Bernard Schultze, Katharina Sieverding, Klaus Staeck, Gabriele Schmidt-Heins, Emil Schumacher, Charles Simonds, Ted Stamm, Jiro Takamatsu, Andrej Tarkowskij, George Trakas, Peter Tuma, Vassilakis Takis, André Thomkins, François Truffaut, Deborah Turbeville, William Henry Fox Talbot, Jean Tinguely, Costas Tsoclis, Richard Tuttle, Antoni Tàpies, Gérard Titus-Carmel, Werner Tübke, Cy Twombly,Günther Uecker, Lee U Fan, Timm Ulrichs, Ursula Schultze-Bluhm, Giuliano Vangi, Wladimir Veličkovič, Bill Viola, Klaus Vogelsang, Hannsjörg Voth, Agnès Varda, Bernard Venet, Luchino Visconti, Wolf Vostell, Andrzej Wajda, Weegee, Orson Welles, Gottfried Wiegand, Claus Peter Wittig, Willie Walker, William Wegman, Wim Wenders, Klaus Wildenhahn, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Franz Erhard Walther, Peter Weibel, Lina Wertmüller, Dorothee von Windheim, Erwin Wortelkamp, Andy Warhol, Lawrence Weiner, Dsiga Wertow, Gerd Winner, Fritz Wotruba, Ryszard Wasko, Roger Welch, Marthe Wéry, Reindert Wepko van de Wint, Klaus Wyborny, Wolfgang Weber, Peter Weller, Tom Wesselmann, Rainer Wittenborn, Keigo Yamamoto, Yves Yerson, Yoshio Yoshida, Frank Young, Herbert Zangs, Gianfranco Zappettini, Jerry Zeniuk, Heinrich Zille, Krzysztof Zanussi, Michele Zaza, Christian Ziewer, Zush

Spanning 170 years, from William Henry Fox Talbot’s first negative to Jeff Wall’s latest constructed tableau, Singular Images collects thought-provoking essays on individual photographs, one image per writer. The essayists consider, sometimes in highly personal ways, the artist’s intention, their own response, the work’s technical complexities, its historical context or its formal properties. Each text captures a sense of how challenging it is to create a perfect single piece. Art photography has been increasingly well-surveyed in recent years, but individual works have rarely been written about at length, perhaps because of lingering doubt that a single photograph can command the kind of sustained attention often given to individual paintings or sculptures. Singular Images is a lively inquiry into the value of analyzing individual photographs, and it persuasively encourages the reader to engage at length and in depth with one remarkable piece at a time. With its broad scope and diverse range of issues, it can also be read as an informal–and thoroughly entertaining–introduction to art photography. Featuring essays by some of the most brilliant critical minds in the field, including David Campany on Man Ray and Marcel Duchamp, Darsie Alexander on Nan Goldin and Liz Jobey on Diane Arbus

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