“Their mutual obsession to record it all in their own media: egocentrifugal forces… who have succeeded here in dedicating their work to each other in the best way, by making them with each other in mind.”

Lee Friedlander’s exploration of one of photography’s most enduring genres began almost by chance, in the late 1970s, when a teacher colleague at Rice University in Houston lined up a regular schedule of nude models for his students. Almost immediately, Friedlander found that he preferred to photograph the models at their homes, and ingeniously deployed household objects such as bedside lamps, potted plants and sofa fabrics to play off against the angular poses of the models and the emphatic framing of the overall composition. Friedlander’s nudes show every blemish, every contour that makes each body unique, while his flash often serves to counter this realism with a softening effect that often recedes the body’s shadow right up to its outline. With the publication of Friedlander’s nude portraits of Madonna (prints of which fetch huge sums), the series became among the photographer’s best known work, and eventually saw publication in 1991, from Jonathan Cape. Lee Friedlander: The Nudes significantly expands on the Cape edition (itself long out of print), with a total of 84 nudes, plus a new layout and design by Katy Homans and new separations by Thomas Palmer. As such, it offers the most lavish presentation of this key series in Friedlander’s massive oeuvre.
Lee Friedlander (born 1934) first came to public attention in the landmark exhibition New Documents, at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 1967. More than 40 books about his work have been published since the early 1970s, including Self-Portrait, Sticks and Stones, Cherry Blossom Time in Japan, Family, America by Car, People at Work, The New Cars 1964 and Mannequin. His career was the focus of a major traveling retrospective organized by The Museum of Modern Art in 2005.

“Like most fathers, Lee Friedlander has made photographs of his wife and children throughout their lives together. Unlike most fathers, Friedlander happens to be one of the greatest living photographers. In Family, Friedlander departs from his well-known terrain of the open road and the city street, focusing instead on his wife, Maria, his children and (later) his grandchildren. The result is an intimate narrative of a family’s complex life, from 1958 to the present. The subjects are natural and unaffected in front of the ever-present lens, and the pictures make it clear that Friedlander’s camera was a constant presence in the home, a natural extension of the artist himself. Over and over Friedlander recognized in an instant things that were precious and universal, yet specific to his own situation. Friedlander has done us a great honor by publishing these images. The inventive design of Family enhances the integrity of Friedlander’s family album.”

Published on the occasion of an exhibition at Rat Hole Gallery, Tokyo. Features excerpts from Friedlander’s Self Portrait, Little Screen, Early Works, The American Monument, Portraits, Nudes, Letters from the People, Self Portrait 1990s, Architectural America, Stems and Landscape.

In Sticks & Stones, Lee Friedlander offers his view of America as seen through its architecture. In 192 square-format pictures shot over the past 15 years, Friedlander has framed the familiar through his own unique way of seeing the world. Whether he’s representing modest vernacular buildings or monumental skyscrapers, Friedlander liberates them from our preconceived notions and gives us a new way of looking at our surrounding environment. Shot during the course of countless trips to urban and rural areas across the country, many of them made by car (the driver’s window sometimes providing Friedlander with an extra frame), these pictures capture an America as unblemished by romanticized notions of human nature as it is full of quirky human touches. Nevertheless, man’s presence is not at stake here; streets, roads, fa ades, and buildings offer their own visual intrigue, without reference to their makers. And in the end, it is not even the grand buildings themselves that prick our interest, but rather the forgettable architectural elements–the poles, posts, sidewalks, fences, phone booths, alleys, parked cars–that through photographic juxtaposition with all kinds of buildings help us to discover the spirit of an Architectural America.

Lee Friedlander’s surreal sensibility is on full display in this set of photographs, originally published in 1970. Here Friedlander focuses on how his physical presence impacts his photographs. Known for capturing subjects outside of himself–nudes, landscapes–Friedlander writes: “At first, my presence in my photos was fascinating and disturbing. But as time passed and I was more a part of other ideas in my photos, I was able to add a giggle to those feelings.” Readers can witness this progression through the images here as Friedlander appears in shadow, reflected in windows and mirrors, and, only occasionally, fully visible through his own camera. In some photos he visibly struggles with the notion of self-portraiture, desultorily shooting himself in household mirrors and other reflective surfaces. Soon, though, he begins to toy with the pictures, almost teasingly inserting his shadow into them to amusing and provocative effect–elongated and trailing a group of women seen only from the knees down; cast and bent over a chair as if seated in it; mirroring the silhouette of someone walking down the street ahead of him; or falling on the desert ground, a large bush standing in for hair. These uncanny self-portraits evoke a surprisingly full landscape of the artist’s life and mind. There are nearly 50 duotone images in this reprint edition of Lee Friedlander: Self Portrait, which includes a new essay about the work by writer John Szarkowski.

Lee Friedlander is one of the most important of the 1960s generation of photographers for whom the posture of disinterested objectivity served as a vehicle for passionate personal inquiries. His large body of work — he most often produces extended series of pictures on a chosen theme, then publishes them in book form — is broad in subject matter and supple and complex in style, and focuses on what he calls America’s “social landscape.” At the same time, he has pursued a playful dialogue with artistic tradition — as though open-eyed curiosity about the world and a sophisticated taste for the wiles of picture-making were one and the same thing. Lee Friedlander takes a deep critical look at Friedlander’s abundantly productive career. Including over 500 photographs grouped by series, and an incisive essay by Peter Galassi, Chief Curator of Photography at The Museum of Modern Art, this publication is the most comprehensive review of the photographer’s career to date.

“In 1897, 16 square blocks just off the French Quarter were designated to be a place where vice would be legal – it was called Storyville. Bellocq managed to capture many of Storyville’s sex workers in their own dwellings not just as sexualized pinups for postcards. Bellocq gained the trust of his subjects, who seem completely at ease before his camera. In 1949, at the age of 76, he fell down some stairs in the French Quarter and hit his head; he died a week later in Charity Hospital. His brother Leo discovered the negatives of the portraits. They ended up stored in a junk shop—a run-down bathroom in an old slave quarters. In 1958, the glass negatives were discovered in a chest, and nine years later, Lee Friedlander acquired the collection. The book, from 1970, begins with a great conversation between Friedlander, a few other photographers from New Orleans, a jazz musician and even one of Bellocq’s subjects.”

@photobookfinds

“Kitchens and bedrooms, couples and children, the expectations and anxieties of American domestic life are laid before us in this lively book of pictures by contemporary American photographers. By turns hilarious and unsettling, this unconventional family album offers rich if conflicting information about the current state of the old relationship between the American Dream and the American Nightmare.”– The work of more than 50 photographers is represented including Tina Barney, Ellen Brooks, William Eggleston, Mary Frey, Lee Friedlander, Nan Goldin, Nic Nicosia, Nicholas Nixon, Lorie Novak, Cindy Sherman, Sage Sohier, Joel Sternfeld, Larry Sultan, Carrie Mae Weems, and Neil Winokur.

A new generation of artists challenge accepted notions of the photographic portrait in this provocative exploration of the face. Amongst those included are Aziz + Cucher, Valérie Belin, Nancy Burson, Rineke Dijkstra, Lee Friedlander, Inez van Lamsweerde/Vinoodh Matadin, Orlan, Martin Parr, Thomas Ruff, and Gillian Wearing.

American photographer Lee Friedlander (b. 1934) has had an expansive career, photographing his subjects—from family and friends to political figures and celebrities—in their everyday environments, while simultaneously changing the very landscape of his chosen media. The Human Clay is a new series of six publications to be released over three years, each of which focuses on images of people and features hundreds of photographs, many never before published, chosen and sequenced by the artist himself from his vast archive. 
 
Portraits presents over 300 photographs of the musicians, authors, artists, and more that Friedlander has met over the last four decades. Many of the images show prominent figures, including artists Maya Lin and Walker Evans, in private spaces—unguarded in living rooms and kitchens, captured in conversation or an embrace.  In others, celebrities such as Fats Domino and Derek Jeter are surrounded by the trappings of fame.
 
 

The camera’s romance with the car: a photo history

Autophoto explores photography’s longstanding and generative relationship to the automobile. Since its invention, the automobile has reshaped our landscape, extended our geographic horizons and radically altered our conception of space and time, influencing the practice of photographers worldwide.
The book shows how the car provided photographers with new subject matter and a new way of exploring the world. It brings together 500 works made by 100 historical and contemporary artists from around the world, including Robert Adams, Brassaï, Edward Burtynsky, Langdon Clay, John Divola, Robert Doisneau, William Eggleston, Elliott Erwitt, Walker Evans, Robert Frank, Lee Friedlander, Anthony Hernandez, Yasuhiro Ishimoto, Jacques Henri Lartigue, Joel Meyerowitz, Daido Moriyama, Catherine Opie, Martin Parr, Rosângela Rennó, Ed Ruscha, Hans-Christian Schink, Malick Sidibé, Stephen Shore and Henry Wessel.
Capturing formal qualities such as the geometric design of roadways or reflections in a rear view mirror, these photographers invite us to look at the world of the automobile in a new way. Autophoto also includes other projects, such as a series of car models that cast a fresh eye on the history of automobile design, created specifically for the Fondation Cartier show by French artist Alain Bublex, plus a comparative history of automobile design and photography, essays by scholars and quotes by participating artists.

The color photographs of Luigi Ghirri (born 1943) revolutionized Italian photography in the 1970s with their gentle humor and appearance of compositional ease. Often compared with the snapshot compositions of Lee Friedlander or William Eggleston, Ghirri’s photographs, often verging on the surreal with their imaginative framing devices and visual puns, placed him in a category all his own. In the early 1980s, Ghirri began to use a medium-format camera that allowed him to produce large, richly textured negatives from whose contact sheets he would extract individual shots. He would then rearrange these small images in various permutations. These “project prints” enabled Ghirri to organize his work in a format that he maintained from the early 1980s until his death in 1992. They are now published for the first time in this volume.

Television emerged as the dominant mass medium in the United States during the era that President John F. Kennedy termed the New Frontier. Although television would soon be decried as “a vast wasteland,” during this era artists began to engage with the medium in a sustained manner for the first time–and not just as an object to be pictured, but as a system that demanded a renegotiation of the relationship between the realms of art and life. The New Frontier is the catalogue of the first exhibition to examine the impact of television on the visual arts in the United States at a crucial period in the development of both. With a lively selection of nearly seventy-five paintings, sculptures, installations, films, videos, photographs, and documents from the United States and Europe, it explores how twenty artists, including Wallace Berman, Bruce Conner, Lee Friedlander, Dennis Hopper, Edward Kienholz, Yoko Ono, Nam June Paik, Robert Rauschenberg, Wolf Vostell, Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselmann, and Garry Winogrand, responded to the increased prominence of television in daily life during the early 1960s. Working in modes and styles as varied as collage and assemblage, Pop Art, Color Field Painting, Fluxus, Performance Art, and documentary photography, these artists engaged with the perceptual, technological, and social changes catalyzed in part by the emergence of television as the dominant mass medium.

Description: Yet Untitled collects together a dedicated selection of contemporary photography. Presented in a uniquely straightforward fashion, with strong nods to the grid, this volume presents work with a range of concerns and content. Included are photographers who focus on issues of documentation, such as the “Becherklasse” (Bernd & Hilla Becher and their former students Candida Hafer, Thomas Ruff and Thomas Struth); those who deal in the subjective, following in the wake of Otto Steinert; and those who have grouped themselves around Michael Schmidt since the early 80s. Nan Goldin, Lee Friedlander, Bettina Rheims, Tom Wood and Hiroshi Sugimoto are just some of the international artists featured. Brought together over the last seven years by Hannover-based traffic planner Bernd F. Knne, the work in Yet Untitled offers a fascinating overview of recent trends in American and European photography. Accompanying essays and an interview with the collector explore the historical development of contemporary photography on both sides of the Atlantic.

The Museum of Modern Art has one of the greatest collections of 20th-century photography in the world. As one of three volumes dedicated to a new history of photography published by the Museum, this publication comprises a comprehensive catalogue of the collection post-1960s and brings much-needed new critical perspective to the most prominent artists working with the photographic medium of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. At a moment when photography is undergoing fast-paced changes and artists are seeking to redefine its boundaries in new and exciting ways, Photography at MoMA serves as an excellent resource for understanding the expanded field of contemporary photography today.
The book begins with an in-depth introduction followed by eight chapters of full-color plates, each introduced by a short essay. Over 250 artists are featured, including Diane Arbus, John Baldessari, Jan Dibbets, Rineke Dijkstra, William Eggleston, Lee Friedlander, Louise Lawler, Zoe Leonard, Helen Levitt, Sigmar Polke, Cindy Sherman, Wolfgang Tillmans, Jeff Wall, Carrie Mae Weems, Hannah Wilke and Garry Winogrand, among many others.

The Little Screens is an influential body of early work by Lee Friedlander that has never been brought together in its entirety until now. The Little Screens and their environments weave a narrative of a peripatetic photographer moving through the landscape of 1960s America, and the melancholy (though sometimes comic) quality of life lived on the road. With a preface written by Walker Evans after he first saw the photographs in 1963.

Los Angeles is a city of dualities-sunshine and noir, coastline beaches and urban grit, natural beauty and suburban sprawl, the obvious and the hidden. Both Sides of Sunset: Photographing Los Angeles reveals these dualities and more, in images captured by master photographers such as Bruce Davidson, Lee Friedlander, Daido Moriyama, Julius Shulman and Garry Winogrand, as well as many younger artists, among them Matthew Brandt, Katy Grannan, Alex Israel, Lise Sarfati and Ed Templeton, just to name a few. Taken together, these individual views by more than 130 artists form a collective vision of a place where myth and reality are often indistinguishable. Spinning off the highly acclaimed Looking at Los Angeles (Metropolis Books, 2005), Both Sides of Sunset presents an updated and equally unromantic vision of this beloved and scorned metropolis. In the years since the first book was published, the artistic landscape of Los Angeles has flourished and evolved. The extraordinary Getty Museum project Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980 focused global attention on the city’s artistic heritage, and this interest has only continued to grow. Both Sides of Sunset showcases many of the artists featured in the original book-such as Lewis Baltz, Catherine Opie, Stephen Shore and James Welling-but also incorporates new images that portray a city that is at once unhinged and driven by irrepressible exuberance. Proceeds from the sale of the book will benefit Inner-City Arts-an oasis of learning, achievement and creativity in the heart of Los Angeles’ Skid Row that brings arts education to elementary, middle and high school students.

Exhibition catalogue edited by and with an introduction by Nathan Lyons with the work of Bruce Davidson, Lee Friedlander, Garry Winogrand, Danny Lyon, and Duane Michals. Includes biographical information and a photo of each photographer. An early introduction to these important photographers; each with a ten-image portfolio. 67 pages; 55 b&w plates; 8.5 x 8 inches.

Street Art, Street Life examines the street as subject matter, venue and source of inspiration for contemporary artists and photographers from the late 1950s to the present. This unique volume includes street photography; documentation of performance, events and artworks presented in the street; works using material from the street; and examples of street culture. Through works by more than 30 world-renowned artists, including Vito Acconci, Amy Arbus, Sophie Calle, Robert Frank, Lee Friedlander, William Klein, Robin Rhode, Martha Rosler, Jamal Shabazz and Garry Winogrand, Street Art, Street Life explores a range of themes related to the street–as arena for political and cultural expression, violence and crime, gender roles in an urban context, advertising and commerce and as counterpoint to museums and other traditional art venues. This volume is published on the occasion of an exhibition of the same name organized by Lydia Yee, Curator at the Barbican Art Gallery in London and Senior Curator at the Bronx Museum of the Arts in New York. Yee contributes an essay, along with Frazer Ward and Katherine Bussard.

From the street photographs of the 1950s and 1960s to the postmodern imagery of the 1980s, from photography that addressed identity politics in the early 1990s to the new imaging technologies of the last decade, photography has been at the forefront of artistic innovation in America. As this volume demonstrates, its capacity for personal expression, for telling stories, and for documenting facts, makes it a medium of eloquence, relevance, and lasting power. The Whitney Museum of American Art, which possesses the single most comprehensive collection of twentieth- and twenty-first-century American art, has in recent years concentrated on expanding its photography collection. Representing the work of more than forty artists, this volume of over 160 photographs highlights the Whitney’s collection and provides photographic visions made by artists living and working in the United States from 1940 to 2000. Accompanying a major exhibition at the Whitney, this catalogue offers portraits, landscapes, streetscapes, and genre subjects from both emerging and well-known photographers, including Diane Arbus, Harry Callahan, William Eggleston, Lee Friedlander, Nan Goldin, Mary Ellen Mark, Joel Meyerowitz, Cindy Sherman, Joel Sternfeld, Brett Weston, and Garry Winogrand.

Winogrand belongs to a group of early explorers of that borderland between documentary and art photography, sharing space with Robert Frank, Lee Friedlander, and Diane Arbus and building on the work of Walker Evans and Weegee. Yet despite a 1988 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art and a huge influence on a younger generation of art photographers, he remains underappreciated by the general public. Hopefully, this lavish publication, concentrating on his most important body of work, the street scenes, will begin to change that. Winogrand took the workaday street tableau and revealed there an intensity and humanity as clear as in any image in a museum. The majority of the 107 photos capture New York in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and they now serve the purpose of a time capsule. But more than that they evoke a timeless spirit of individual alive in the city.

Photography Calling! shows photographic work by thirty Artists, among others, by Robert Adams, Diane Arbus, Lee Friedlander, John Gossage, Boris Adams, Diane Arbus, Lee Friedlander, John Gossage, Boris Mikhailov, Elisabeth Neudörfl und Winogrand. The greats of photography are aware of recent Artists against. In this way, differences occur and unexpected relationships clearly. With this judicious mixture Photography Calling! opened a dispute about the documentary in photography across different periods and styles.

Band 1: malerei, plastik, performance.- Band 2: fotografie film video.- Band 3: handzeichnungen, utopisches design, bücher.- Artsts: Berenice Abbott, Hermann Albert, Carl Andre, Ben d’Armagnac, Christian Ludwig Attersee, Vito Acconci, Pierre Alechinsky, Theo Angelopoulos, Arman (Armand Fernandez), Bernhard Aubertin, Valerio Adami, Gerhard Altenbourg, Ottomar Anschütz, Fernando Arrabal, Joannis Avramidis, Robert Adamson, Robert Altman, Horst Antes, Eduardo Arroyo, Alice Aycock, Peter Ackermann, Anatol, Ant Farm, Art & Language, Billy Adler, Gisela Andersch, Shusaku Arakawa, David Askevold, Chantal Akerman, Laurie Anderson, Diane Arbus, Eugène Atget, Francis Bacon, Monika Baumgartl, Joseph Beuys, Fernando Botero, Kevin Brownlow & Andrew Mollo, Michael Badura, Hippolyte Bayard, Michael von Biel, Margaret Bourke-White, Günter Brus, Eduard Denis Baldús, Thomas Bayrle, Werner Bischof, Mathew B. Brady, Anatol Brosilowsky, Balthus, Cecil Beaton, Louis-Auguste Bisson & Auguste-Rosalie Bisson, Brassaï (Gyula Halász), Wojciech Bruszewski, Joachim Bandau, Bernd e Hilla Becher, Irma Blanck, George Brecht, Luis Buñuel, Jared Bark, Stephan Beck, Karl Blossfeldt, KP Brehmer, Chris Burden, Robert Barry, Bill Beckley, Bernhard Blume, George Hendrik Breitner, Daniel Buren, Jennifer Bartlett, John Ernest Joseph Bellocq, Mel Bochner, Heinz Breloh, Scott Burton, Gianfranco Baruchello, Carmelo Bene, Peter Bogdanovich, Robert Bresson, Michael Buthe, Giorgio Batistella, Franz Bernhard, Claus Böhmler, Stuart Brisley, James Lee Byars, Gerd Baukhage, Jean-Marie Bertholin, Blythe Bohnen, Jürgen Brodwolf, Horst H. Baumann, Nuccio Bertone, Karl Bohrmann, Marcel Broodthaers, Bodo Baumgarten, Jean-Louis Bertucelli, Christian Boltanski, Stanley Brouwn, Enzo Cacciola, Robert Capa, Barbara Chase-Riboud, Pinchas Cohen-Gan, Michael Craig-Martin, Julia Margaret Cameron, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Eduardo Chillida, James Collins, Fritz Cremer, Colin Campell, Étienne Carjat, Christo, Miguel Condé, José Luis Cuevas, Peter Campus, Ugo Carrega, Chryssa, Tony Conrad, Edward Curtis, Louis Cane, Lewis Carroll, Chuck Close, Steven Cortright, Veassis Caniaris, Claude Chabrol, Harold Cohen, Claudio Costa, Miodrag Djuric (Dado), Douglas Davis, Walter De Maria, Jim Dine, Juan Downey, Louis Daguerre, Ger Dekkers, Agnes Denes, Henry + Bool Alfred + John Dixon, Peter Downsborough, Hanne Darboven, Willem de Kooning, Fred Deux, Dore O., Michael Druks, Alan Davie, Philip Henry Delamotte, Jan Dibbets, Ugo Dossi, Marcel Duchamp, John Davies, Jack Delano, Braco Dimitrijevic, Christian Dotremont, David Douglas Duncan, Don Eddy, Paul Eliasberg, Heinz Emigholz, Ulrich Erben, Walker Evans, Benni Efrat, Ger van Elk, Ed Emshwiller, Hugo Erfurth, Valie Export, Sergej Eisenstein, Peter Henry Emerson, Leo Erb, Garth Evans, Öyvind Fahlström, Federico Fellini, Dan Flavin, Charles Frazier, Lee Friedlander, Herbert Falken, Roger Fenton, Richard Fleischer, Hermine Freed, Hamish Fulton, Ralston Farina, Armand Fernandez, Lucio Fontana, Will Frenken, Heidi Fasnacht, Vincenzo Ferrari, Fred Forest, Achim Freyer, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Robert Filliou, Terry Fox, Gisèle Freund, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Wolfgang Gäfgen, Jochen Gerz, Tina Girouard, Dan Graham, Nancy Graves, Abel Gance, Paul-Armand Gette, Michael Gitlin, Eve Gramatzki, Alan Green, Alexander Gardner, Peter Gidal, Wilhelm von Gloeden, Tom J. Gramse, Marty Greenbaum, Winfred Gaul, Wolfram Giersbach, Jean-Luc Godard, Gotthard Graubner, Alberto Grifi, Rupprecht Geiger, Gilbert & George, Hubertus Gojowczyk, Nancy Graves, Robert Grosvenor, Michael Geissler, Frank Gilette, Kuno Gonschior, Walter Grasskamp, Hetum Gruber, Arnold Genthe, Raimund Girke, Camille Graeser, Gotthard Graubner, Renato Guttuso, Roel D’Haese, Haus-Rucker-Co, Wilhelm Hein, Lewis Hine, Nan Hoover, Helfried Hagenberg, Erich Hauser, Bernhard Heisig, Leon Hirszman, Rebecca Horn, David Hall, Lady Hawarden, Michael Heizer, Antonius Höckelmann, Horst P. Horst, Nigel Hall, Ron Hays, Al Held, David Hockney, George Hoyningen-Huene, Phillipe Halsman, Tim Head, Werner Herzog, Anatol Herzfeld, Alfred Hofkunst, Richard Hamilton, Erwin Heerich, Eva Hesse, Rudolf Hoflehner, Douglas Huebler, Heijo Hangen, Axel Heibel, David Octavius Hill, Edgar Hofschen, Danièle Huillet, Noriyuki Haraguchi, Birgit Hein, John Hilliard, Hans Hollein, Alfonso Hüppi, Karl Horst Hödicke, Shohei Imamura, Will Insley, Jean Ipoustéguy, Patrick Ireland, Hans Paul Isenrath, Ken Jacobs, Paul Jaray, Jasper Johns, Francis Benjamin Johnston, Miklós Jancsó, Jo Jastram, J. Douglas Johnson, Donald Judd, Horst Janssen, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Joan Jonas, Martha Jungwirth, Wolf Kahlen, Buster Keaton, Jürgen Klauke, Beril Korot, Ferdinand Kriwet, Max Kaminski, Ellsworth Kelly, Alexander Kluge, Joseph Kosuth, Germaine Krull, Howard Kanovitz, Michael Kenny, Werner Knaupp, Jannis Kounellis, Shigeko Kubota, Tadeusz Kantor, André Kertész, Günther Knipp, Andras Kovács, Stanley Kubrick, Allan Kaprow, Anselm Kiefer, Milan Knížák, Attila Kovács, Gary Kuehn, Dani Karavan, Harry Kipper, Imi Knoebel, Kurt Kren, Marin Karmitz, Alain Kirili, Alice Kochs, Dieter Krieg, Gertrude Kasebier, Ronald B. Kitaj, Christof Kohlhöfer, Richard Kriesche, On Kawara, Konrad Klapheck, Jiří Kolář, Les Krims, Willem de Kooning, László Lakner, Barry Le Va, Michael Leisgen, Lawrence Lobe, Urs Lüthi, Arthur Lamothe, Russell Lee, Les Levine, Francisco Lopez, Georg Platt Lynes, Richard Landry, Jean Le Gac, Sol LeWitt, Antonio Lopez-Garcia, Nikolaus Lang, Gustave Le Gray, Roy Lichtenstein, Joseph Losey, Dorothea Lange, Malcolm Le Grice, Richard Lindner, Bernhard Luginbühl, John Latham, Barbara Leisgen, Michael Lingner, Bernhard Lüthi, Heinz Mack, Kenneth Martin, Gerhard Merz, Alexander Mitta, Robert Morris, Nino Malfatti, Charles Marville, Mario Merz, Milan Mölzer, Alfons Maria Mucha, Felix H. Man (Hans Baumann), Roberto Matta, Borg Mesch, Bernard Moninot, Ugo Mulas, Robert Mangold, Gordon Matta-Clark, Anette Messager, Henry Moore, Antoni Muntadas, Andy Mann, Wolfgang Mattheuer, Adolphe de Meyer, Stefan Moore, Walter Murch, Werner Mantz, Cynthia Lee Maughan, Duane Michals, Carmengloria Morales, J.-J. Murphy, Piero Manzoni, Antony McCall, Henri Michaux, Marcello Morandini, Zoran Mušič, Giacomo Manzù, Barry McCallion, Rune Mields, Pit Morell, Eadweard Muybridge, Robert Mapplethorpe, Bruce McLean, Antoni Miralda, François Morellet, Brice Marden, Syd Mead, Josef Mikl, Maria Moreno, Agnes Martin, Dariush Mehrjui, Joan Miró, Malcolm Morley, Tomitaro Nachi, Bruce Nauman, Wolfgang Nestler, Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, Maria Nordman, Félix Nadar, Charles Nègre, Richard Newton, Ansgar Nierhoff, Gabriele & Helmut Nothhelfer, Maurizio Nannucci, Werner Nekes, Max Neuhaus, Richard Nonas, Lev V. Nussberg, Dore O., Timothy O’Sullivan, Roman Opalka, Nagisa Oshima, Oswald Oberhuber, Claes Oldenburg, Dennis Oppenheim, Jean Otth, Brian O’Doherty, Claudio Olivieri, Anna Oppermann, Hilmar Pabel, Giulio Paolini, A. R. Penck, Pablo Picasso, Lucio Pozzi, Nam June Paik, Eduardo Paolozzi, Peng-Wan-Ts, Otto Piene, Heinz-Günter Prager, Blinky Palermo, Gordon Parks, Beverly Pepper, Walter Pichler, Mario Prassinos, Magnus Palsson, Sergei Paradschanow, Elio Petri, Anne & Patrick Poirier, Panamarenko, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Wolfgang Petrick, Sigmar Polke, Gina Pane, Max Peintner, Friederike Pezold, Don Potts, Isabel Quintanilla, Daniel Quintero, William Raban, John Reilly, Jacob August Riis, Peter Roehr, Ed Ruscha, David Rabinowitch, James Reineking, Bridget Riley, Ulrike Rosenbach, Ken Russell, Arnulf Rainer, Albert Renger-Patzsch, Klaus Rinke, James Rosenquist, Claude Rutault, Yvonne Rainer, Jean Renoir, Larry Rivers, Francesco Rosi, Reiner Ruthenbeck, Robert Rauschenberg, Alain Resnais, Jacques Rivette, Roberto Rossellini, Robert Ryman, Man Ray, Erich Reusch, Józef Robakowski, Dieter Roth, Éric Rohmer, Tony Ray-Jones, Hans Peter Reuter, Dorothea Rockburne, Arthur Rothstein, Martial Raysse, George Warren Rickey, Alexander Rodtschenko, Gerhard Rühm, Reindeer Werk, Hans Salentin, Tomas Schmit, Eugen Schönebeck, Michael Singer, Edward Steichen, Sohrab Shadid Saless, Wolfgang Schmitz, Martin Schwarz (Künstler), Willi Sitte, Saul Steinberg, Erich Salomon, Helmut Schober, Martin Scorsese, Neal Slavin, Frank Stella, Lucas Samaras, Eugen Schönebeck, George Segal, David Smith, Alfred Stieglitz, Fred Sandback, Ben Schonzeit, Antonio Seguí, Robert Smithson, Sir Benjamin Stone, August Sander, Rudolf Schoofs, Friedrich Seidenstücker, Fernando Ezequiel Solanas, Paul Strand, Sarkis Zabunyan, Jan Schoonhoven, Richard Serra, Michael Snow, Jean-Marie Straub, Antonio Saura, Werner Schroeter, Ben Shahn, Alan Sonfist, Liselotte Strelow, Konrad Balder Schäuffelen, Heinz Schubert, Joel Shapiro, Eve Sonneman, Michell Stuart, Georgij Schengalaja, Alf Schuler, Charles Sheeler, Keith Sonnier, Josef Sudek, Alexander Schleber, HA Schult, Stephen Shore, Daniel Spoerri, István Szábo, Barbara Schmidt-Heins, Bernard Schultze, Katharina Sieverding, Klaus Staeck, Gabriele Schmidt-Heins, Emil Schumacher, Charles Simonds, Ted Stamm, Jiro Takamatsu, Andrej Tarkowskij, George Trakas, Peter Tuma, Vassilakis Takis, André Thomkins, François Truffaut, Deborah Turbeville, William Henry Fox Talbot, Jean Tinguely, Costas Tsoclis, Richard Tuttle, Antoni Tàpies, Gérard Titus-Carmel, Werner Tübke, Cy Twombly,Günther Uecker, Lee U Fan, Timm Ulrichs, Ursula Schultze-Bluhm, Giuliano Vangi, Wladimir Veličkovič, Bill Viola, Klaus Vogelsang, Hannsjörg Voth, Agnès Varda, Bernard Venet, Luchino Visconti, Wolf Vostell, Andrzej Wajda, Weegee, Orson Welles, Gottfried Wiegand, Claus Peter Wittig, Willie Walker, William Wegman, Wim Wenders, Klaus Wildenhahn, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Franz Erhard Walther, Peter Weibel, Lina Wertmüller, Dorothee von Windheim, Erwin Wortelkamp, Andy Warhol, Lawrence Weiner, Dsiga Wertow, Gerd Winner, Fritz Wotruba, Ryszard Wasko, Roger Welch, Marthe Wéry, Reindert Wepko van de Wint, Klaus Wyborny, Wolfgang Weber, Peter Weller, Tom Wesselmann, Rainer Wittenborn, Keigo Yamamoto, Yves Yerson, Yoshio Yoshida, Frank Young, Herbert Zangs, Gianfranco Zappettini, Jerry Zeniuk, Heinrich Zille, Krzysztof Zanussi, Michele Zaza, Christian Ziewer, Zush

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