five or six contains texts selected from more than 100 reviews, articles, and catalogue essays published by Liam Gillick since 1989. The book includes some of the formal, social, and ideological concerns that have merged in Gillick’s “What if? Scenario.” “What’s the scenario? A constantly mutating sequence of possibilities. Add a morsel of difference and the results slip out of control, shift the location for action and everything is different. There is a fundamental gap between societies that base their development on scenarios and those that base their development on planning. It could be argued that the great Cold War divide in socio-economic structuring was rooted in the different kinds of results that you get if you apply either one or the other technique to working out how things might end up in the future. And it is claimed that scenario thinking won. Our vision of the future is dominated by the ‘What If? Scenario’ rather than the ‘When do we Need More Tractors? Plan.’” Liam Gillick

Hans-Ulrich Obrist once organized a science and art conference with all of the infrastructure of a conference–the parties, chats, lunches, airport arrivals–but with no actual conference. Apparently it was hugely successful and spawned many ongoing collaborations.~This tale is told by Bruce Mau in the introduction to Bridge the Gap?, the printed result of an evolving conference that looks at the increasing interest in science demonstrated in the work of many contemporary artists, architects and designers, as well as by thinkers in the humanities. Included are texts by Marina Abramovic, Arima Akito, are you meaning company, Oladélé A. Bamgboyé, Stefano Boeri, John Casti, Gregory J. Chaitin, Chang Yung-Ho, Olafur Eliasson, Cerith Wyn Evans, Liam Gillick, Joseph Grigely, Carsten Höller, Hsia Chu-Joe, Ikegami Takashi, Evelyn Fox Keller, Rem Koolhaas, Kunitake Toyoki, Sarat Maharaj, Mogi Ken’ichiro, Sanford Kwinter, Mark Leonard, William Lim, Ken Lum, Jeff Preiss, Israel Rosenfield, Saskia Sassen, Luc Steels, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Wang Jian-Wei and Anton Zeilinger, plus a musical project on audio CD by Pipilotti Rist and Anders Guggisberg. Edited by Hans-Ulrich Obrist and Miyake Akiko. Paperback, 8.5 x 6.75 in./551 pgs / 608 color 10 BW0 duotone 0 DVD~ Item D20350

Collected here for the first time are Liam Gillick’s fictional writings: McNamara, Erasmus is Late, Ibuka!, The Winter School, Discussion Island/Big Conference Centre, and Literally No Place. Presenting the historical, utopian visions of society and speculating on them often through the fictionalized voices of secondary historical characters, these ideas are explored in a nonlinear, open-ended discursive format, in which the text mirrors the structure of the presented ideas. Gillick’s concern is to explore complex, paradoxical historical and ideological moments, reflecting on how the redundant utopian elements of the past continue to inform both our contemporary and post-utopian future.

The central character of Erasmus is Late is Erasmus Darwin, opium-eater and brother of the more famous Charles who is indeed late. Late for a dinner party that he himself is giving and whose illustrious guests, already assembled around his table, include: Robert McNamara, Secretary of Defense under Kennedy; Masura Ibuka, co-founder of Sony; and Murry Wilson, father of Brian Wilson. Whilst the guests wait, Erasmus dawdles through contemporary London becoming waylaid by different sites, which represent for Gillick, the development of free-thinking; Gillian Gillick, the artist’s mother, illustrates these sites with line drawings. Erasmus Darwin epitomises for Gillick the activity of free-thinking; a form of political pursuit dependent on wealth and leisure and problematic in its relationship to ‘unfree’ thought and the working classes. On one level a guide to contemporary London seen through the eyes of a Georgian, Erasmus is Late is also an examination of pre-Marxist positions, an ill-researched investigation of a Utopian optimism that is struggling to predict the future.

Born in 1964, Liam Gillick was one of the artist – including Damien Hirst and Angela Bulloch who dominated British art through the 1990s. He’s spent years as the post-conceptual crowd-pleaser, with a controversial solo show in the German pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2009 only the most recent triumph. His sculptural forms and settings seem terse, yet, writes curator Robert Fleck, ”they evince a strong almost celebratory intellectual presence.”

This monumental 256-page, full-color catalog serves as a comprehensive mid-career retrospective, compiled by the artist himself. With his muscular combination of words, forms and ideas, the works are both narrative and non-narrative. For example, in ”The State itself Becomes a Super Whatnot,” a vivid aluminum and Plexiglas installation derives, in the artist’s words, ”from Brazilian research into Scandinavian car production.”

Gillick has created over 2000 multi-dimensional works exploring – in his casual, playful yet deeply political way – ideas about capitalism, social organizations, social volatility and the myriad possibilities of instability. The New York-based artist’s quest has continually been something of a causal chain that investigates concepts such as utopia, parallelism, space and time, using them all as a search for utopia. As Gillick says, ”One long walk… Two short piers…”

The definitive volume so far on this incessantly interesting and rigorous artist. With texts by Nicolas Bourriaud and Isabelle Moffat.

This new monograph, the first in 10 years to bring together a truly substantial body of Gillick’s work, takes as its focus the artist’s projects of the last five years, proposing a new reading of his oeuvre. It draws attention to the rigor of the thinking developed in both his sculptural work and his writings, as well as to his sharp visual sense of the structural and formal properties of his materials. Gillick appeared on the scene at the beginning of the 1990s, right in the middle of the YBA phenomenon, and has since had wide exposure in exhibitions like Documenta, Manifesta and the Venice Biennale, and in being nominated for the 2002 Turner prize.

The use of metaphor has always been a central strategy of art. In The Metaphor Problem Again, American artists John Baldessari and Lawrence Weiner join British artist Liam Gillick for a discussion about the use of metaphor in their work. Their exciting and passionate conversation leads to a new perception of metaphor and its function in art and architecture.

Born in 1964, Liam Gillick was one of the artist – including Damien Hirst and Angela Bulloch who dominated British art through the 1990s. He’s spent years as the post-conceptual crowd-pleaser, with a controversial solo show in the German pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2009 only the most recent triumph. His sculptural forms and settings seem terse, yet, writes curator Robert Fleck, ”they evince a strong almost celebratory intellectual presence.” This monumental 256-page, full-color catalog serves as a comprehensive mid-career retrospective, compiled by the artist himself. With his muscular combination of words, forms and ideas, the works are both narrative and non-narrative. For example, in ”The State itself Becomes a Super Whatnot,” a vivid aluminum and Plexiglas installation derives, in the artist’s words, ”from Brazilian research into Scandinavian car production.” Gillick has created over 2000 multi-dimensional works exploring – in his casual, playful yet deeply political way – ideas about capitalism, social organizations, social volatility and the myriad possibilities of instability. The New York-based artist’s quest has continually been something of a causal chain that investigates concepts such as utopia, parallelism, space and time, using them all as a search for utopia. As Gillick says, ”One long walk … Two short piers …” The definitive volume so far on this incessantly interesting and rigorous artist. With texts by Nicolas Bourriaud and Isabelle Moffat.

To the Moon via the Beach was a three-day exhibition in the Amphitheatre in Arles. Using tons of sand specially shipped there, the iconic arena was transformed into a beach and, during a process of non-stop activity co-ordinated by Willem Stijger, slowly mutated into a moonscape. It created a backdrop for a series of interventions by 20 artists in and around the arena—Uri Aran, Daniel Buren, Elvire Bonduelle, Lili Reynaud-Dewar, Loretta Fahrenholz, Fischli & Weiss, Jef Geys, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster/Ari Benjamin Meyers/Tristan Bera, Douglas Gordon, Pierre Huyghe, Klara Lidén, Renata Lucas, Benoît Maire, Oscar Murillo, Anri Sala, Pilvi Takala, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Tris Vonna-Michell, and Lawrence Weiner. This book offers a complete record of the event, and presents chronological photographic documentation, allowing the event to be reconstructed and understood as a whole for the first time. An extensive discussion between Liam Gillick, Philippe Parreno, and Hans Ulrich Obrist sheds light on the event’s historical context and its experimental potential.

Anri Sala’s video “Intervista” (1998) begins with the artist moving house and finding an old 16 mm film in a box. On it he can see an interview with a young woman, whom he recognizes as his mother, being interviewed for state television in their native Albania. Without the sound reel the sense of the interview is lost, so Sala enlists lip-readers to restore the missing words. When he shows the subtitled film to his mother, she reacts to the words of her younger self with disbelief – could she really have spouted the empty rhetoric the ruling party? When the film cuts to a shot of her smiling beside the party leaders, the video shows her lifting a hand to her mouth in astonishment, or perhaps recognition. Raised in Albania, Sala relocated to Paris to attend the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Arts Decoratifs, and moved to Berlin in 2003. In a relatively short time, he has developed a vision that addresses the issues of a posthistorical world with a haunting simplicity that transcends cultures and borders. While his work’s technical simplicity recalls straight documentary practices, its basic concerns – light and darkness, achrome and colour, sound and silence – weave into a poetic investigation of its own medium, whether video, photography or sound installation. Sala has had solo exhibitions at museums around the world – including CCA Kitakyushu in Japan, De Appel in Amsterdam, the Art Institute of Chicago and the Musee d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris – and his work is regularly featured in major international exhibitions – including the 49th and 50th Venice Biennales (2001 and 2003), the 25th Sao Paulo Biennale (2002) and the 2nd Berlin Biennale (2002). Included in the book are an interview with the artist, a survey providing an overview and analysis of the artist’s entire career, a focus that discusses a single important artwork in detail, a piece of writing chosen by the artist for its personal significance and a selection of the artist’s own writings.

The book features all 153 original posters created by the 127 artists invited to participate in It’s Urgent!, an open-form touring exhibition. Artists from all over the world responded to Hans Ulrich Obrist’s invitation to address the most pressing themes of our times―ecology, inequality, common future, solidarity, anti-racism and social justice. It’s Urgent! aims to make the artists’ ideas open up to new audiences and insert them into public life and the community at large. Artists include: Etel Adnan, Tania Bruguera, Olafur Eliasson, Hans Haacke, Wolfgang Tillmans, Rirkrit Tiravanija, David Adjaye, Mark Bradford, Judy Chicago, Douglas Coupland, Jimmie Durham, Formafantasma, Cao Fei, Fernando Garcia-Dory, Liam Gillick, Renée Green, Newton Harrison, Luchita Hurtado, Pierre Huyghe, Koo Jeong A, Josh Kline, Suzanne Lacy, Yoko Ono, Trevor Paglen, Raymond Pettibon, Raqs Media Collective, Peter Saville, Stephen Shore, Lawrence Weiner and Stanley Whitney.

Catalogue for Biennale Architettura 2014. Swiss Pavilion. With the partecipation of Herzo& de Meuron, Lorenza Baroncelli, Liam Gillick, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Dorothea von Hantelmann, Philippe Parreno, Tino Seghal, Atelier Bow-Wow, Stefano Boeri, Eleanor Bron, Elizabeth Diller, Olafur Eliasson, Dan Graham, Samantha Hardingham, Carsten Höller, Koo Jeong A, Asad Raza, Rikrit Tiravanija and Mirko Zardini

Few living artists can claim to have had the influence of Michael Craig-Martin (born 1941). Celebrated internationally for his own art, he has also helped nurture generations of younger artists, among them Julian Opie, Damien Hirst, Sarah Lucas, Liam Gillick and Gary Hume. Often described as the godfather of the YBAs, he taught by combining personal example and individual guidance, offering students practical advice and insights gained from his own professional highs and lows. Part memoir and part instructional guide, On Being an Artist mixes reminiscence, personal philosophy, self-examination and advice for the budding artist. In a series of short episodes, Craig-Martin reflects with both wit and candor on the many ideas, events and people that have inspired and shaped him throughout his life, from his childhood in postwar America through his time as an art student at Yale in the 1960s and subsequent work as a teacher, to his international success in later years.

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