“Giorgio Griffa is one of the least-known Turin-born artists of the Arte Povera generation. Another precious ‘secret’ that the city of Turin, discreet and haughty as ever, has managed to keep under wraps—in this case for almost half a century. From the immediate post-war period, a singular group of young artists in the city helped write the history of European art in the second half of the twentieth-century. Together with now universally acclaimed figures, such as Alighiero Boetti, Giuseppe Penone, Giulio Paolini, Giovanni Anselmo, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Gilberto Zorio, and Mario and Marisa Merz, there were also other leading artists in Turin, who have only recently begun to receive the international attention they deserve. Here I am thinking of the likes of Piero Gilardi, Gianni Piacentino, Carol Rama, Salvo, and Aldo Mondino, but also of the eccentric and eclectic Carlo Mollino. Griffa was one of the most discreet and isolated in this group of young people who revolved around Sperone’s gallery. He immediately showed an exclusive interest in painting, while his companions mainly moved out towards sculpture and installation from the mid-sixties.”—Andrea Bellini Published on occasion of the cycle of exhibitions dedicated to the work of Giorgio Griffa (Turin, 1936) (Centre d’Art Contemporain, Geneva; Museu de Arte Contemporanea de Serralves, Porto; Bergen Kunsthall; and Fondazione Giuliani, Rome) this monograph aims—through a series of essays by Andrea Bellini, Luca Cerizza, Laura Cherubini, Martin Clark, Suzanne Cotter, and Chris Dercon, a conversation between Griffa and Hans Ulrich Obrist, and a selection of artist’s writings and a chronology compiled by Marianna Vecellio—to highlight the very diverse features and extraordinary richness of Griffa’s paintings.

Exhibition catalogue published in conjunction with Prospect 69 held September 30 – October 12, 1969. Conceived of and organized by Konrad Fischer and Hans Strelow. Edited section by Seth Siegelaub incorporates interviews with Robert Barry, Douglas Huebler, Joseph Kosuth, and Lawrence Weiner conducted individually by themselves. rovides an overview of participating galleries and their artists.
Artists include Bernd & Hilla Becher, Hanne Darboven, Jan Dibbets, Bruno Gronen, Michael Heizer, Sol LeWitt, Richard Long, Reiner Ruthenbeck, and Niele Toroni. Additionally includes full-page images or projects by Robert Smithson (Mirror Displacement, Portland Isle, England, 1969), Charles Ross, Markus Raetz, Jean-Frédéric Schnyder, Jannis Kounellis, Eliseo Mattiacci, Stanley Brouwn, Alighero Bottti (1/2 page), Emilio Prini (1/2 page), Giuseppe Penone (1/2 page), Pier Paolo, Calzolari (1/2 page), E.P. Butler (1/2 page), Eric Orr (1/2 page), James Lee Byars (1/2 page), Paul Cotton (1/2 page), Hans Haacke, Lynda Benglis, Ron Cooper, Doug Wheeler, Giorgio Griffa, David Prentice, a double-page centerfold of blue stripes by Daniel Buren, Dennis Oppenheim, ZAJ-Gruppe, Dick Higgins, Joseph Beuys (photo by Ute Klophaus, David Lamelas, and 13 “Information” pages with advertising

References : “Seth Siegelaub : Beyond Conceptual Art” by Leontine Coelewij, Sara Martinetti, Marja Bloem, Julia Bryan-Wilson, Jo Melvin, Götz Langkau, Matilda McQuaid, Alan Kennedy, Seth Siegelaub. Köln and Amsterdam, Germany / Netherlands : Verlag der Buchandlung Walther König / Stedelijk Museum, 2016, pp. 176-179. “Six Years, The Dematerialization of the Art Object from 1966 to 1972 : A Cross-Reference Book of Information on Some Esthetic Boundaries . / edited and annotated by Lucy R. Lippard.” by Lucy R. Lippard. Praeger Publishers Inc., NY / DC : Praeger Publishers Inc., 1973, pp. 113 – 115.

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