The book features all 153 original posters created by the 127 artists invited to participate in It’s Urgent!, an open-form touring exhibition. Artists from all over the world responded to Hans Ulrich Obrist’s invitation to address the most pressing themes of our times―ecology, inequality, common future, solidarity, anti-racism and social justice. It’s Urgent! aims to make the artists’ ideas open up to new audiences and insert them into public life and the community at large. Artists include: Etel Adnan, Tania Bruguera, Olafur Eliasson, Hans Haacke, Wolfgang Tillmans, Rirkrit Tiravanija, David Adjaye, Mark Bradford, Judy Chicago, Douglas Coupland, Jimmie Durham, Formafantasma, Cao Fei, Fernando Garcia-Dory, Liam Gillick, Renée Green, Newton Harrison, Luchita Hurtado, Pierre Huyghe, Koo Jeong A, Josh Kline, Suzanne Lacy, Yoko Ono, Trevor Paglen, Raymond Pettibon, Raqs Media Collective, Peter Saville, Stephen Shore, Lawrence Weiner and Stanley Whitney.

With a main essay by Christian Rattemeyer, texts from 1969 by Wim Beeren, Charles Harrison, Harald Szeemann and Tommaso Trini, additional new commissions from Claudia Di Lecce and Steven ten Thije, interviews with artists Marinus Boezem, Jan Dibbets, Ger van Elk, Piero Gilardi and Richard Serra and an introduction by Teresa Gleadowe The ‘new art’ of the late 1960s was shown in two landmark exhibitions in 1969: ‘Op Losse Schroeven’ and ‘When Attitudes Become Form’. This book reveals how each brought together Arte Povera, Anti-Form, Conceptual and Land art, whilst challenging such categories and introducing innovative curatorial strategies. Christian Rattemeyer offers a rich comparative analysis of the two exhibitions, exploring the related but differing approaches of the two curators – Wim Beeren and Harald Szeemann – in the two distinct institutional settings of the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and the Kunsthalle Bern. Numerous installation photographs enable a virtual ‘walk through’ of each exhibition, while meticulous chronologies detail the negotiations that shaped them. Crucial texts from the time are complemented by new research and recent interviews with participating artists. This book inaugurates the Exhibition Histories series, which investigates exhibitions that have shaped the way contemporary art is experienced, made and discussed.

Hip Pocket Sleaze is an introduction to the world of vintage, lurid adult paperbacks. Charting the rise of sleazy pulp fiction during the 1960s and 1970s and reviewing many of the key titles, the book takes an informed look at the various genres and markets from this enormously prolific era, from groundbreaking gay and lesbian-themed books to the Armed Services Editions. Influential authors, publishers and cover artists are profiled and interviewed, including the “godfather of gore” H. G. Lewis, cult lesbian author Ann Bannon, fetish artist par excellence Bill Ward and many others. A companion to Bad Mags, Headpress’ guide to sensationalist magazines of the 1970s, Hip Pocket Sleaze also offers extensive bibliographical information and plenty of outrageous cover art.

With a main essay by Christian Rattemeyer, texts from 1969 by Wim Beeren, Charles Harrison, Harald Szeemann and Tommaso Trini, additional new commissions from Claudia Di Lecce and Steven ten Thije, interviews with artists Marinus Boezem, Jan Dibbets, Ger van Elk, Piero Gilardi and Richard Serra and an introduction by Teresa Gleadowe The ‘new art’ of the late 1960s was shown in two landmark exhibitions in 1969: ‘Op Losse Schroeven’ and ‘When Attitudes Become Form’. This book reveals how each brought together Arte Povera, Anti-Form, Conceptual and Land art, whilst challenging such categories and introducing innovative curatorial approaches. Christian Rattemeyer offers a rich comparative analysis of the two exhibitions, exploring the related but differing approaches of the two curators – Wim Beeren and Harald Szeemann – in the two distinct institutional settings of the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and the Kunsthalle Bern. Numerous installation photographs enable a virtual ‘walk through’ of each exhibition, while meticulous chronologies detail the negotiations that shaped them. Crucial texts from the time are complemented by new research and recent interviews with participating artists. This book inaugurates the Exhibition Histories series, which investigates exhibitions that have shaped the way contemporary art is experienced, made and discussed.

Volume: Independent bimonthly for architecture to go beyond itself Volume 10 features interviews with Peter Cook, Rene Daalder, Hernan Diaz-Alonso, Cesar Millan, Philippe Parreno, and François Roche; book discussion with Kenneth Frampton; essays by Arakawa + Gins, Jane Harrison and David Turnbull, Reinhold Martin, Mark Wigley, Neil Denari, Sean Dockray, Richard Massey, Ben Nicholson, Paul Preissner, Tony Chakar, Kai Vöckler, Andrew Herscher, and more. Includes a special first issue of ALIBI, a new magazine for architecture and travel.

“Tam’s sketches have a remarkable poetic and lyrical quality. The wistful tenderness of his portraits of young combatants are a unique testimony to the cruelty of war on one’s own soil. There is also something surreal and inspiring in the fact that in the hell hole that was the battle of Dien Bien Phu, the artist found the peace of mind to sketch and draw, a peace of mind close to meditation. His sketches and diary redefine our understanding of the Vietnam War.” -Jessica Harrison-Hall, curator of Vietnamese Art, Department of Asia, the British Museum Artist and military reporter, Pham Thanh Tam was 22 years old when he wrote his diaries and created his sketches at the battle of Dien Bien Phu during the Franco-Vietnam War (1946-1954). Tam’s visual account benefits from his unique position as an army reporter with access to key information sources, from his frontline perspective, and from his vivid reporting and incisive analysis. As a personal tale, these images express a young man’s coming of age during times of war, and underscore his ability to retain a sense of humour and compassion under fire. Carrying only his paint brushes, Chinese ink, chalk, and pencils, Tam trusted his companions with his life as he drew sketches of and for the soldiers. In the tradition of war artists and reporters of the First World War, he moved around the battlefield, through the muddy, bloodied trenches, slept next to cannons, joined digging teams, and marched with the troops. Reproduced here, Tam’s pensive, tender, and lyrical sketches are rare documents that have survived the battlefield–fragile images on notepaper that show one artist’s ability to sketch beauty in the midst of a battle referred to by journalist Bernard B. Fall as “hell in a very small place.”

With the aid of over 250 source images and documents, many hitherto unknown, this book reveals how photography, film, mass-media imagery and other sources informed Bacons painting and, in particular, how lens-based images, as he put it, helped to trigger the most significant turning-point in his stylistic development. Key influences, including the masters Velazquez, Poussin and Rodin, the photographer Eadweard Muybridge and the film director Sergei Eisenstein, are discussed. So too are the precedents set by other artists working in the tradition of making use of mechanical reproductions artists including Picasso and Sickert. Bacons work is also viewed in the context of his contemporaries, such as Lucian Freud, Mark Rothko, Graham Sutherland and Patrick Heron. In addition, analysis of elements of Bacons biography and psychology leads to some startling and original insights into the man and the unique iconography of his art. This is a book that addresses important questions about Bacons painting practice and sheds new light on his life and work.

Compared to other avant-garde movements that emerged in the 1960s, conceptual art has received relatively little serious attention by art historians and critics of the past twenty-five years—in part because of the difficult, intellectual nature of the art. This lack of attention is particularly striking given the tremendous influence of conceptual art on the art of the last fifteen years, on critical discussion surrounding postmodernism, and on the use of theory by artists, curators, critics, and historians. This landmark anthology collects for the first time the key historical documents that helped give definition and purpose to the movement. It also contains more recent memoirs by participants, as well as critical histories of the period by some of today’s leading artists and art historians. Many of the essays and artists’ statements have been translated into English specifically for this volume. A good portion of the exchange between artists, critics, and theorists took place in difficult-to-find limited-edition catalogs, small journals, and private correspondence. These influential documents are gathered here for the first time, along with a number of previously unpublished essays and interviews. Contributors: Alexander Alberro, Art & Language, Terry Atkinson, Michael Baldwin, Robert Barry, Gregory Battcock, Mel Bochner, Sigmund Bode, Georges Boudaille, Marcel Broodthaers, Benjamin Buchloh, Daniel Buren, Victor Burgin, Ian Burn, Jack Burnham, Luis Camnitzer, John Chandler, Sarah Charlesworth, Michel Claura, Jean Clay, Michael Corris, Eduardo Costa, Thomas Crow, Hanne Darboven, RaAl Escari, Piero Gilardi, Dan Graham, Maria Teresa Gramuglio, Hans Haacke, Charles Harrison, Roberto Jacoby, Mary Kelly, Joseph Kosuth, Max Kozloff, Christine Kozlov, Sol LeWitt, Lucy Lippard, Lee Lozano, Kynaston McShine, Cildo Meireles, Catherine Millet, Olivier Mosset, John Murphy, HAlio Oiticica, Michel Parmentier, Adrian Piper, Yvonne Rainer, Mari Carmen Ramirez, Nicolas Rosa, Harold Rosenberg, Martha Rosler, Allan Sekula, Jeanne Siegel, Seth Siegelaub, Terry Smith, Robert Smithson, Athena Tacha Spear, Blake Stimson, Niele Toroni, Mierle Ukeles, Jeff Wall, Rolf Wedewer, Ian Wilson.

This volume brings expert opinion and first-hand testimony to bear upon the events surrounding the creation and destruction of Andy Warhol’s Thirteen Most Wanted Men at the 1964 New York World’s Fair. The complex constellation of art, politics and gay life surrounding Warhol’s mural and its painting-over comes alive in 13 interviews-with historian Hilary Ballon, critic Douglas Crimp, poet Diane di Prima, 1964 World’s Fair head of television Albert Fisher, poet John Giorno, art historian Anthony Grudin, civil rights historian Felicia Kornbluh, former Warhol assistant and poet Gerard Malanga, filmmaker Jonas Mekas, art historian Richard Meyer, former Warhol assistant and photographer Billy Name, Rockefeller biographer Richard Norton Smith and architect and critic Mark Wigley. The interviews are introduced by the show’s co-curator Larissa Harris, and accompanied by reproductions of all of the Thirteen Most Wanted Men; photographs of Warhol and the Fair by Factory regulars and photojournalists; and rarely seen archival documents from Warhol’s Time Capsules.

It was at Black Mountain College that Merce Cunningham formed his dance company, John Cage staged his first “happening,” and Buckminster Fuller built his first dome. Although it lasted only twenty-four years (1933-1957) and enrolled fewer than 1,200 students, Black Mountain College launched a remarkable number of the artists who spearheaded the avant-garde in America of the 1960s. The faculty included such diverse talents as Anni and Josef Albers, Eric Bentley, Ilya Bolotowsky, Robert Creeley, Willem de Kooning, Robert Duncan, Lyonel Feininger, Paul Goodman, Walter Gropius, Franz Kline, Robert Motherwell, and Charles Olson. Among the students were Ruth Asawa, John Chamberlain, Francine du Plessix Gray, Kenneth Noland, Arthur Penn, Robert Rauschenberg, Kenneth Snelson, Cy Twombly, Stan Vanderbeek, and Jose Yglesias.In this definitive account of the arts at Black Mountain College, back in print after many years, Mary Emma Harris describes a unique educational experiment and the artists and writers who conducted it. She replaces the myth of the college as a haphazardly conceived venture with a portrait of a consciously directed liberal arts school that grew out of the progressive education movement. Proceeding chronologically through the four major periods of the college’s history, Harris covers every aspect of its extraordinary curriculum in the visual, literary, and performing arts.

Artists: Marina Abramovic, Carmen Almon, Luiz Alphonsus, Ben d’Armagnac, John M. Armleder, Conrad Atkinson, Christian Ludwig Attersee, Alice Aycock, Lewis Baltz, Jack Barth, Jennifer Bartlett, Lynda Benglis, Jaap Berghuis, Mari Boeyen, Michal Bogucki, Christian Boltanski, Hans Brosch, Ian Carr-Harris, Luciano Castelli, Louis Chacallis, Pinchas Cohen-Gan, Paolo Cotani, Groupe Coum, Michael Craig-Martin, Gerrit Dekker, Martin Disler, Goran Djordjevic, Noel Dolla, Ugo Dossi, Juan Downey, Michael Druks, Markus Duik, David Dye, Pablo Echaurren, I.R.G., Bob Evans, Valie Export, Helmut Federle, John C. Fernie, Guy Fihman, Barry Flanagan, Emil Forman, Terry Fox, Hermine Freed, Iole de Fretas, Kazumichi Fujiwara, Marie-Louise de Geer-Bergenstrahle, Andreas Gehr, Wim Gijzen, Marcia Giluly, Gary-John Glaser, Gyula Gulyas, Nigel Hall, Jene Highstein, Naoyoshi Hikosaka, Hans van Hoek, Alain d’Hooghe, Rebecca Horn, Pierre Alain Hubert, Vivien Isnard, Bernard Joubert, Etsutomu Kashihara, Theatre Kassaknak, Pierre Keller, Nancy Kitchel, Wolf Knoebel, Rob van Koningsbruggen, Miloslav Laky, Darcy Lange, Terence-David LaNoue, Kang-So Lee, Barbara et Michael Leisgen, Barbara Linkevitch, Natalia LL Permato, Bernd Lohaus, Jeffrey Lowe, Urs Luthy, Groupe Lyn, Renato Maestri, Tim Mapston, Bill Martin, Gordon Matta-Clark, Anthony McCall, Ronald Michaelson, Samuel Montealegre, Miloslav Mucha, Gregoire Muller, Antonio Muntadas, Tsuneo Nakai, Hitoshi Nomura, Jacques Louis Nyst, Anna Opperman, Bernard Pages, Friederike Pezold, Walter Pfeiffer, Jean-Pierre Pincemin, Howardena D. Pindell, Fabrizio Plessi, Litiana Porter, Ulrike Rosenbach, Martin Rous, Moon-Seup Shim, Alex Silber, Charles Simonds, Alan Sonfist, Keith Sonnier, Judith Stein, John Setzaker, Ben Sveinsson, Kyoji Takubo, Gage Taylor, Olivier Thorme, Francesc Torres, Andre Valensi, Jean-Louis Vila, Hanna Villiger, William Viola, Tetsuya Watanabe, van de Wint, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Troels Worsel, Jan Zavarsky, Michele Zaza

Since its launch in late 2000, Cabinet magazine has become a touchstone for a certain approach to understanding culture, one that shuns orthodox distinctions–high/low, serious/humorous, professional/amateur–in favor of a commitment to the idea that all objects, practices and discourses can, if read against the grain, teach us something important about the world. Its hybrid sensibility merges the visually engaging style of an arts periodical, the exuberance of a fanzine and the in-depth exploration of a scholarly journal to create a sourcebook of ideas for an international audience of readers, from artists and designers to scientists, philosophers and historians. Using essays, interviews and artist projects to present a variety of topics in language accessible to the non-specialist, Cabinet has aimed to encourage a new culture of curiosity. This anthology brings together some of the most interesting successes, and a few instructive failures, published in the first 40 issues of Cabinet, virtually all of which are sold out, along with essays specially commissioned for the volume. It includes texts and artist projects by Francis Alÿs, Jonathan Ames, Janine Antoni, Barbara M. Benedict, Daniel Birnbaum, D. Graham Burnett, Francis Cape, Anne Carson, Paul Collins, Lorraine Daston, Moyra Davey, Mark Dery, Brian Dillon, Jeff Dolven, Spencer Finch, Douglas Gordon, Anthony Grafton, Sabrina Gschwandtner, Rachel Harrison, Shelley Jackson, Jonathan Lethem, Virgil Marti, Albert Mobilio, Vik Muniz, Alexander Nagel, Matthew Ritchie, Daniel Rosenberg, Alexandre Singh, Jane South, Christopher Turner, Marina Warner and many others.

In a world falling to pieces, a new breed of art objects is capturing its fractured allure in three dimensions. UNMONUMENTAL features recent work by thirty contemporary sculptors at the vanguard of their craft, selected by one of contemporary art’s top curatorial teams. The sculptures in UNMONUMENTAL are forerunners in a major new artistic development. They are powerful but patently un-heroic; assembled from bits of the world at large, they are sardonic metaphors for our time. The artists featured in the book range from the just-emerged (Tobias Buche, Claire Fontaine, Gedi Sibony) to the internationally renowned (John Bock, Isa Genzken, Rachel Harrison). UNMONUMENTAL is generously illustrated with large full-color photographs of the works, most of which have never before been published. UNMONUMENTAL was created in conjunction with the inaugural exhibition of the New Museum of Contemporary Art’s landmark new building, designed by Seijima + Nishazawa / SANAA, on the Bowery in New York.

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