Current debates about the status of Modernism have led to an increasing interest in critical and aesthetic theories, and to a questioning of some of the traditional assumptions and limits of art history. The aim of this substantial anthology is to equip the student, teacher and interested general reader with the necessary materials for an up-to-date understanding of twentieth-century art.
Beside the writings of the century’s major artists, Art in Theory includes relevant texts by critics, philosophers, politicians and literary figures. It is organised into eight sections, from the legacy of Symbolism at the turn of the century to contemporary debates about the Postmodern. Each section is prefaced by a brief essay. There are introductions for all of the 300-plus texts, which serve to place theories and critical approaches in context. The result is both a comprehensive collection of documents on twentieth-century art and an encylopaedic history of relevant theory.

This book begins with the observation that contemporary artists have embraced and employed gravity as an immaterial readymade. Necessarily focusing on material practices – chiefly sculpture, installation, performance, and film – this discussion takes account of how and why artists have used gravity and explores the similarities between their work and the popular cultural forms of circus, vaudeville, burlesque, and film. Works by Rodney Graham, Stan Douglas, and Robert Smithson are mediated through ideas of Gnostic doubt, atomism, and new materialism. In other examples – by John Wood and Paul Harrison, Gordon Matta-Clark, Peter Fischli and David Weiss, Trisha Brown, and Bas Jan Ader – mass and momentum, falling objects, and falling bodies are examined in relation to architecture, sculpture, and dance. In performances, projects and events curated by Bruce Nauman, Santiago Sierra, and Catherine Yass, gravity is resisted in Sisyphean ordeals and death-defying stunts. This account of contemporary art and performance, read through the invisible membrane of gravity, exposes new and distinctive approaches to agency reduction, authorial doubt, and redemptive failure.

This insightful book is the first to present a comprehensive survey of the Modernist movement as it emerged in America between 1920 and 1960 in various graphic media. It identifies and examines great works in advertising, information design, identity, magazine design, print, dimensional design, and posters that by mid-century had defined American graphic design. R. Roger Remington begins by discussing the emergence of Modernism and its major historical influences, including European avant-garde art movements, technology, geopolitical issues, popular culture, educational innovations such as the Bauhaus, architecture, industrial design, and photography. The heart of the book brings together the key works of mid-century Modernism, presenting them chronologically from the 1930s to the 1950s. The final section shows the impact of and reactions to these Modernist influences as graphic design in America matured into the 1960s and beyond. Handsomely designed and illustrated, American Modernism is destined to become,a classic text in the study of design and visual culture. Contents Preface The Basis for the New: The Cradle of Modernism, 1850-1899 A New World Forming: The Impact of Modernism, 1900-1919 American Design in Transition: Traditional to Modernism, 1920-1929 Into the Design Scene: Modernism Arrives in America, 1930-1939 At War and After: The Creative Forties in America, 1940-1949 A New Style: American Design at Mid-Century, 1950-1959 Design Since Mid-Century: Diversity and Contradiction, 1960-1999 Notes Bibliography Picture credits Acknowledgements Contains work by Alvin Lustig, Alvar Aalto, Dr. Mehemed Fehmy Agha, Constantin Alajalov, Josef Albers, Alexander Archipenko, Merle Armitage, Frank Barr, Hans Barschel, Saul Bass, Bauhaus, Willy Baumeister, Herbert Bayer, Lester Beall, Max Beckmann, Norman Bel Geddes, Morris Benton, Henryk Berlewi, Lucian Bernhard, Joseph Binder, Ernst Bohm, Will Bradley, Georges Braque, Frances Brennan, Marcel Breuer, Alexey Brodovitch, Max Burchartz, Will Burtin, Jean Carlu, David Carson, Melbert Cary, A. M. Cassandre, Ernest Caulkins, Cherryburn Press, Arthur Cohen, Charles Coiner, Container Corporation of America, Cranbrook Academy of Art, Louis Danziger, Claude Debussy, Rudolph De Harak, Fortunato Depero, Donald Deskey, De Stijl, Deutscher Werkbund, Walter Dexel, Otto Dix, Cesar Domela, Henry Dreyfuss, William Addison (W. A.) Dwiggins, Charles Eames, Milton Feasley, Gene Federico, Max Fleischer, Fortune Magazine, Dan Friedman, Leon Friend, Robert Gage, Sigfried Giedion, George Giusti, Milton Glaser, William Golden, Morton Goldsholl, Frederick Goudy, April Greiman, Glenn Grohe, Walter Gropius, George Grosz, Edmund Guess, Jay Hambridge, Richard Edes Harrison, Baron Georges Eugene Hausmann, Raoul Hausmann, John Heartfield, Hannah Hoch, Hans Hofmann, Gerald Holton, Clarence Hornung, Johannes Itten, Egbert Jacobsen, S. A. Jacobs, Robert Jensen, Philip Johnson, Bobby Jones, L. B. Jones, Wassily Kandinsky, Susan Kare, Edward McKnight Kauffer, Rockwell Kent, Gyorgy Kepes, Frederick Kiesler, Paul Klee, Knoll Furniture Company, Rudolph Koch, Willi Kunz, Le Corbusier, Fernand Leger, Alexander Liberman, Leo Lionni, El Lisstsky, George Lois, William Longhauser, Herb Lubalin, Katherine McCoy, Douglas McMurtrie, James Mangan, Man Ray, John Massey, Herbert Matter, Rollo May, Ludwig Meidner, R. Hunter Middleton, Ludwig Mies Van Der Rohe, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Otto Mueller, Otto Neurath, Olivetti, Maxfield Parrish, Art Paul, Paul Theobald & Company, Sir Joseph Paxton, Max Pechstein, Charles Pegay, John Pemberton, Edward Penfield, Pablo Picasso, Cipe Pineles, Giovanni Pintori, PM Magazine, Ezra Pound, Push Pin Studios, Paul Rand, Paul Renner, Frank Robinson, Bruce Rogers, Gilbert Rohde, Lester Rondell, George Salter, L. Sandusky, Paula Scher, Kurt Schwitters, Joseph Sinel, Mino Somenzi, Edward Steichen, Alex Steinweiss, Otto Storch, Paul Strand, Ladislav Sutnar, Walter Dorwin Teague, Bradbury Thompson, Karl Tiege, A. Tolmer, Jan Tschichold, Massimo Vignelli, Vogue Magazine, James Watt, Wolfgang Weingart, Westvaco, Wes Wilson, Henry Wolf, Frank Lloyd Wright, Piet Zwart, and others.

The origins of the collection of the Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst date from the late 1950s, it initiated by the migros founder Gottlieb Duttweiler; and, in the late 1970s, began concentrating on collecting international contemporary art. This publication offers a wide overview focusing on the core pieces of the collection, which consists of around 400 artworks by international and Swiss contemporary artists such as Art & Language, Maurizio Cattelan, Christopher Wool, Katharina Sieverding, Rachel Harrison, Marc Camille Chaimowicz, Christoph Büchel, Paul Thek, and Douglas Gordon. The large-scale illustrations are accompanied with texts by writers such as Tom Holert, Tirdad Zolghadr, and Jan Verwoert, reflecting different museums and collection strategies, and referring in particular to the history of the museum which was founded in 1996. Further texts by Philip Ursprung, Heike Munder, and others, outline the main thematic focuses of the collection as political art, participation strategies of the 1990s, glamour and Pop, and the psychological meaning of space and architecture in contemporary art. Short texts by Raphael Gygax, Judith Welter, and Bettina Steinbrügge highlight a selection of specific works and artists in the collection.

Volume: Independent bimonthly for architecture to go beyond itself Volume 10 features interviews with Peter Cook, Rene Daalder, Hernan Diaz-Alonso, Cesar Millan, Philippe Parreno, and François Roche; book discussion with Kenneth Frampton; essays by Arakawa + Gins, Jane Harrison and David Turnbull, Reinhold Martin, Mark Wigley, Neil Denari, Sean Dockray, Richard Massey, Ben Nicholson, Paul Preissner, Tony Chakar, Kai Vöckler, Andrew Herscher, and more. Includes a special first issue of ALIBI, a new magazine for architecture and travel.

This popular anthology of twentieth-century art theoretical texts has now been expanded to take account of new research, and to include significant contributions to art theory from the 1990s. * New edition of this popular anthology of twentieth-century art-theoretical texts. * Now updated to include the results of new research, together with significant contributions from the 1990s. * Includes writings by critics, philosophers, politicians and literary figures. * The editors provide contextual introductions to 340 texts. * Complements Art in Theory 1648-1815 and Art in Theory 1815-1900 to create a complete survey of the theories underpinning the development of art in the modern period.

Crying Men is a series of photographic portraits of famous film actors: Tim Roth, Gabriel Byrne, Laurence Fishburne, Woody Harrelson, Michael Gambon, Jude Law, Hayden Christiansen, Ryan Gosling, Robert Downey Jr., Paul Newman, Ed Harris, Benicio Del Toro, Willem Dafoe, Kris Kristofferson, and others. Sam Taylor-Wood makes portraits of her subjects as actors; she shoots them in character, asking each to perform and cry for the camera, and demanding their investment in the process. These are no passive sitters. Each of the resulting images is distinct; one actor recalls the hieratic clarity of a Byzantine saint whose tears appear decorative. Other images are of heroic crying, where stoic restraint has broken down. Some display the voluptuous crying of medieval saints, others cathartic crying or quiet tears of regret and grief. Yet while being moved by these intimate revelatory images, we simultaneously know that the emotional display is being play-acted. Sam Taylor-Wood’s film and photographic works are distinguished by their subversive creation of enigmatic situations full of latent but explosive energy.

It was at Black Mountain College that Merce Cunningham formed his dance company, John Cage staged his first “happening,” and Buckminster Fuller built his first dome. Although it lasted only twenty-four years (1933-1957) and enrolled fewer than 1,200 students, Black Mountain College launched a remarkable number of the artists who spearheaded the avant-garde in America of the 1960s. The faculty included such diverse talents as Anni and Josef Albers, Eric Bentley, Ilya Bolotowsky, Robert Creeley, Willem de Kooning, Robert Duncan, Lyonel Feininger, Paul Goodman, Walter Gropius, Franz Kline, Robert Motherwell, and Charles Olson. Among the students were Ruth Asawa, John Chamberlain, Francine du Plessix Gray, Kenneth Noland, Arthur Penn, Robert Rauschenberg, Kenneth Snelson, Cy Twombly, Stan Vanderbeek, and Jose Yglesias.In this definitive account of the arts at Black Mountain College, back in print after many years, Mary Emma Harris describes a unique educational experiment and the artists and writers who conducted it. She replaces the myth of the college as a haphazardly conceived venture with a portrait of a consciously directed liberal arts school that grew out of the progressive education movement. Proceeding chronologically through the four major periods of the college’s history, Harris covers every aspect of its extraordinary curriculum in the visual, literary, and performing arts.

Since its launch in late 2000, Cabinet magazine has become a touchstone for a certain approach to understanding culture, one that shuns orthodox distinctions–high/low, serious/humorous, professional/amateur–in favor of a commitment to the idea that all objects, practices and discourses can, if read against the grain, teach us something important about the world. Its hybrid sensibility merges the visually engaging style of an arts periodical, the exuberance of a fanzine and the in-depth exploration of a scholarly journal to create a sourcebook of ideas for an international audience of readers, from artists and designers to scientists, philosophers and historians. Using essays, interviews and artist projects to present a variety of topics in language accessible to the non-specialist, Cabinet has aimed to encourage a new culture of curiosity. This anthology brings together some of the most interesting successes, and a few instructive failures, published in the first 40 issues of Cabinet, virtually all of which are sold out, along with essays specially commissioned for the volume. It includes texts and artist projects by Francis Alÿs, Jonathan Ames, Janine Antoni, Barbara M. Benedict, Daniel Birnbaum, D. Graham Burnett, Francis Cape, Anne Carson, Paul Collins, Lorraine Daston, Moyra Davey, Mark Dery, Brian Dillon, Jeff Dolven, Spencer Finch, Douglas Gordon, Anthony Grafton, Sabrina Gschwandtner, Rachel Harrison, Shelley Jackson, Jonathan Lethem, Virgil Marti, Albert Mobilio, Vik Muniz, Alexander Nagel, Matthew Ritchie, Daniel Rosenberg, Alexandre Singh, Jane South, Christopher Turner, Marina Warner and many others.

John Cage was one of the most extraordinary and intriguing composers of the twentieth century–or perhaps of any century. His vast corpus of musical compositions, writings, and performances has amazed, amused, bored, enlightened, angered, and fascinated audiences throughout the world. Despite the controversy surrounding his work, there is little disagreement about his role as one of the most important and influential members of the avant-garde. In Writings about John Cage, the renowned Cage expert Richard Kostelanetz has collected the writings of thirty-seven prominent scholars and critics. Selections include articles by the composers Henry Cowell, Peggy Glanville-Hicks, Lou Harrison, Michael Nyman, Virgil Thomson, and Christian Wolff; by literary figures Paul Bowles, John Hollander, and Manfredi Piccolomini; by critics Daniel Charles, Jill Johnston, Edward Rothstein, Calvin Tomkins, and Peter Yates; and by performers Merce Cunningham and Paul Zukofsky. The contributions cover all aspects of Cage’s life and career, including his music, his aesthetics, his prose and poetry, his visual art, and his contributions to modern dance. Richard Kostelanetz is a poet and critic who has written and edited numerous books on aesthetics, the avant-garde, and literature, including The Avant-Garde Tradition in Literature, On Innovative Music(ian)s, The Theatre of Mixed Means, and Esthetics Contemporary. He is the author of The Old Poetries and the New, also published by the University of Michigan Press. His books on Cage include John Cage and Conversing with Cage. “. . . the most intelligently chosen book of writings about Cage that I’ve seen. . . . Kostelanetz is a practiced and gifted anthologist, with the discriminating eye of a litterateur, the sensibility of a poet, and the ear of a musician. . . . . [N]o matter how we read Writings about John Cage, we learn–from intelligent and serious teachers whose writings are worth the effort.”–Institute for Studies in American Music Newsletter “. . . belongs in the library of anyone who is trying to understand and to deal with John Cage.”–Performing Arts Journal

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