‘Milton Glaser’s designs changed the way we see the world.’ – Gloria Steinem An overview of the work of illustrator and designer Milton Glaser during the 1960s and 70s From 1954, when he co-founded the legendary Push Pin Studios, to the late ’70s, Milton Glaser was one of the most celebrated graphic designers of his day, whose work graced countless book and album covers, posters, magazine covers, and advertisements, both famous and little-known. Glaser largely defined the international visual style for illustration, advertising, and typeface design and interest in his legacy continues unabated, with modern creatives acknowledging his influence; for example, in 2014 Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner enlisted Glaser to design the ad campaign and branding for the show’s final season. His renowned work garnered solo exhibitions at the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Creator of the iconic ‘I love NY’ logo (featuring a heart symbol in place of the word ‘love’) and cofounder of New York magazine, Glaser received numerous accolades and lifetime achievement awards. Across thousands of works across all print media, he invented a graphic language of bright, flat color, drawing and collage, imbued with wit. This collection of work from Glaser’s Pop period features hundreds of examples of his design that have not been seen since their original publication, demonstrating the graphic revolution that transformed design and popular culture.

Terrorist groups are no different from other organizations in their use of branding to promote their ideas and to distinguish themselves from groups that share similar aims. The branding they employ may contain complex systems of meaning and emotion; it conveys the group’s beliefs and capabilities. Branding Terror is the first comprehensive survey of the visual identity of the world’s major terrorist organizations, from al-Qaeda and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine to the Tamil Tigers. Each of the 60-plus entries contains a concise description of the group’s ideology, leadership, and modus operandi, and a brief timeline of events. The group’s branding — the symbolism, colors, and typography of its logo and flag — is then analyzed in detail. Branding Terror does not seek to make any political statements; rather, it offers insight into an understudied area of counter-intelligence, and provides an original and provocative source of inspiration for graphic designers.

Alvin Lustig was modern before it was cool. But there has never been a monograph devoted to his workóuntil now. A genius best known for his book covers and interior design, his theories on design education were precursors to the curricula of some of the most renowned design schools today. Lustig lent his imaginative vision and talent to a wide range of legendary projects, from the groundbreaking architecture of 1940s Los Angeles to magazine covers that have become collector’s items. Spanning the breadth of Lustig’s tragically brief but prolific career, Born Modern is a must-have for any student or practitioner of design, as well as anyone interested in the history of American visual culture.

100 Classic Graphic Design Journals surveys a unique collection of the most influential magazines devoted to graphic design, advertising, and typography. These journals together span over 100 years of the history of print design and chart the rise of graphic design from a necessary sideline to the printing industry to an autonomous creative profession.

Each magazine is generously illustrated with a large selection of spreads and covers. A descriptive text based, where possible, on interviews with editors, designers, and publishers is also included for each magazine alongside comprehensively researched bibliographic material. The magazines featured cover a range of industries and eras, from advertising (Publimondial, La Pubblicità Italiana), posters (Das Plakat, Affiche), and typography (Typografische Monatsblätter, Typographica), to Art Nouveau (Bradley, His Book), Modernist design (Neue Grafik, ULM) and Post-Modern and contemporary graphics (Emigre, It’s Nice That). These 100 journals offer an invaluable resource to historians and students of graphic design, and a rich seam of visual research and inspiration for graphic designers.

A sequel to its popular forerunner, this edition casts the net even further in examining the reasons and history behind various objects of design that have had a significant impact on our culture. The objects discussed range from the vintage posters that promoted concerts and fairs during the 1930s to a Rolling Stones’ CD cover from the 1990s. This volume also investigates larger movements and phenomena, including Norman Rockwell’s affect on Americana and Cartoon Network’s hold on children. Like the first volume, this is an eclectic look at how, why, and if graphic design, in the broadest sense, works as an influence on the public eye. Designers, students, and anyone interested in the history and dynamics of graphics as art and craft will find this an engaging and instructive read. Allworth Press, an imprint of Skyhorse Publishing, publishes a broad range of books on the visual and performing arts, with emphasis on the business of art. Our titles cover subjects such as graphic design, theater, branding, fine art, photography, interior design, writing, acting, film, how to start careers, business and legal forms, business practices, and more. While we don’t aspire to publish a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are deeply committed to quality books that help creative professionals succeed and thrive. We often publish in areas overlooked by other publishers and welcome the author whose expertise can help our audience of readers.

Merz to Emigré and Beyond is a historical survey of avant-garde cultural and political magazines and newspapers from the early twentieth century to the present day. The book features a unique selection of international publications from Europe and the USA – including Merz (1920s), View (1940s), East Village Other (1960s), Punk (1970s), Raw (1980s) and Emigr+ (1990s). The design of these magazines, often raucous and undisciplined, was as ground-breaking as the ideas they disseminated. Many were linked with controversial art, literary and political movements such as Dada, Surrealism, Modernism, the New Left and Deconstruction. They contain the work of many leading experimental artists and designers of their time – from Kurt Schwitters and El Lissitzky in the 1920s and 30s, to Art Spiegelman and Rudy Vanderland in the 1980s and 90s.Steven Heller is a Senior Art Director at the New York Times and co-chair of the MFA/Design Program of the School of Visual Arts in New York.

This provocative survey reveals how four of the most destructive dictatorships of the 20th century – Nazi Germany, Fascist Italy, Soviet Russia and Communist China – used graphic design to sell their messages. Explores each regime’s distinctive strategies for seducing public opinion and infiltrating people’s lives, in media ranging from logos, flags, typefaces and posters to children’s books and figurines Remarkable archival photographs set the disturbingly powerful graphic devices in historical context. The perceptive text analyses how these four regimes established the most effective modes of visual propaganda, which were later adopted and adapted by many other dictatorships.

Words have the power to move. In 1962 a modest design studio created its own riff on that statement in the form of a small booklet of typographic brilliance, and changed forever how designers thought about the graphic potential of words. Decades later, the impact of watching words move is still felt. Never before had the idea been so lucidly and playfully expressed that type itself could speak, that word-forms carried their own implied visual meanings; that the placement of letters on the page could suggest motion, narrative, emotion just about anything. Now widely available for the first time, this reproduction of the original includes thoughts by influential designers George Lois, April Greiman, Kit Hinrichs, Michael Carabetta, and Steven Heller on the lasting impact of this lively type primer, and presents its still-fresh innovation to new generations of designers.

This is the most comprehensive publication ever produced on the work of American artist Barbara Kruger. Kruger, one of the most influential artists of the last three decades, uses pictures and words through a wide variety of media and sites to raise issues of power, sexuality, and representation. Her works include photographic prints on paper and vinyl, etched metal plates, sculpture, video, installations, billboards, posters, magazine and book covers, T-shirts, shopping bags, postcards, and newspaper op-ed pieces. This book serves as the catalog for the first major one-person exhibition of Kruger’s work to be mounted in the United States. The book, designed by Lorraine Wild in collaboration with the artist, contains texts by Rosalyn Deutsche, Katherine Dieckmann, Ann Goldstein, Steven Heller, Gary Indiana, Carol Squiers, and Lynne Tillman on subjects associated with Kruger’s work, including photography, graphic design, public space, power, and representation, as well as an extensive exhibition history, bibliography, and checklist of the exhibition. The cover features a new piece by Kruger, entitled Thinking of You,created especially for the catalog.

Presented here in this visual anthology are the current boutique periodicals so cutting-edge, they will continue to flourish in print even as their mainstream contemporaries move to digital. Selected from more than 20 countries are preeminent covers and layouts from over 150 independent magazines that advance the medium through their presentation (Gum, Kilimanjaro), content (Re, Richardson), design (Uovo, Werk), and tailoring to a niche market (Fantastic Man, Me). Featuring essays from top industry thinkers such as Steven Heller (New York Times Book Review), Terry Jones (ID), and Robert Sacks (High Times, Time Inc.), this will be the sourcebook for magazine aficionados and professionals. The Last Magazine is published in association with the traveling exhibition, Magazines in Transition, which opens in New York in September, 2006 and travels to museums and galleries in ten cities worldwide including Barcelona, Paris, Luxembourg, Tokyo and Hong Kong.

Dissent is an essential part of keeping democratic societies healthy, and our ability as citizens to voice our opinion is not only our privilege but our responsibility. Without this dialogue, the backbone of what we have fought so desperately for could easily crumble. Over the past several decades, we have seen the number of democratic societies around the globe increase, and during the past ten years, there has been a heightened awareness of the increasing conflicts and problems that both directly and indirectly affect our everyday lives. With the Middle East’s never ending conflict, the war on terrorism, and the numerous financial and environmental crises, peopleÆs sense of safety, power, and representation has diminished in part because they feel they have no voice. Designers, however, have used their skills to communicate their dissent throughout history and are doing so even more now with the birth of the Web and the increasing ease of distributing posters and other printed materials. A picture is worth a thousand words and designers have used this adage to their advantage by creating simple yet powerful designs that immediately convey poignant messages to their viewers. The Design of Dissent will examine graphic work focusing on social and political concerns from around the globe. The time is certainly ripe as the U.S. — and world — flare in opposition on so many important issues. Table Of Contents from The Design of Dissent Communism Palestine and Israel Ex-Yugoslavia Iraq War Peace Equality Food Animals Corporate World Media Gun Control Religion Government U.S. Presidential Election Foreword: Tony Kushner Milton Glaser Interviewed by Steven Heller Directory of Contributors Acknowledgments

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