AILA, meaning big family in Turkish, is Kawauchis most evocative work assembled in this lavish publication. This immense new body of work features over 100 prints by this young Japanese photographer from Tokyo. Kawauchi celebrates the awe-inspiring essence of life with a presentation that features images of animals, plants and humans depicted in various stages of transition.

Rinko Kawauchi — a photographer whose presence has spread across borders while drawing acclaim from both Japan and throughout the West. This pioneer of a new age of photography now brings you a solo exhibition of reflection — unifying both works from her first, signature collection as well as her newest compilation of photographs. Her exhibition begins in January of 2016 at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Kumamoto. This text, serving as an exhibition catalogue, functions also as a photobook of Kawauchi’s newly opened exhibition for The river embraced me. Her exhibition unifies the stories of people’s memories with works of photography — featuring her brand new works shot across forty different locations, all inspired by memories of the people of Kumamoto. By capturing the backdrops of these recollections, the experience brings life to memory within the photographer, and as such allows the viewer to feel the budding of memories of their own. Within time, flowing like a river, we find our memories embracing all of us. Through the scenes and places captured within these photographs, one finds this photo collection to be overflowing with refreshing moments — ones that open the doors to our own memory. Through opening a new frontier through Aso in Kumamoto as the backdrop of Kawauchi’s previous work “Ametsuchi,” we find her continuing her foresighted expression of what it means to feel “alive in the moment” throughout this newest work. Through this book, one can definitively see Kawauchi’s continuously unfolding potential.

Halo takes us into a hypnotizing visual journey intertwining centuries-long human and natural rituals from sacred fired of the Izumo Japanese sanctuary, to hurling of molten iron during the New Year celebrations in Chinese Hebei province, to the flocks of birds along the English coasts. Like in Illuminance, Rinko Kawauchi offers the same vision of beauty in the details of existence in a more spiritual vein alternating between dark atmosphere and explosions of light. The Japanese photographer achieves this journey by a poem and a short text (in French) extending the reflection on these images, metaphors of our current world, between hope and chaos.

This tranquilly meandering volume is a record of conversations between two artists who are also long-time friends, conducted through poetry and softly resonant photographs. Artist Leiko Ikemura’s main techniques are painting and ceramic sculpture. Photographer Rinko Kawauchi is trusted by Ikemura to be present as she produces her taut, finely honed works. The correspondence that continues when they are apart, radiating and responding to each other’s artistic realms, expresses their individual approaches to the indeterminate nature of our world. The correspondence accompanying their respective travels is also included in the book.

Brazil, a country of vast wealth and poverty, diverse cultures, rich and diverse nature and wildlife, festivals and an all encompassing rhythm and chaos of life was the site of Kawauchis most recent project after a two year break. The glossy colour photographs collected in this travelogue demonstrate, aside from the photographers hallmark eye for detail, a maturing vision and sensitivity that may deservedly be called monumental.

n 2001, Rinko Kawauchi launched her career with the simultaneous publication of three astonishing photobooksUtatane, Hanabi, and Hanakofirmly establishing her as one of the most innovative newcomers to contemporary photography, not just in Japan, but across the globe. In the years that followed, she published other notable monographs, including Aila (2004), The Eyes, the Ears (2005), and Semear (2007). And now, ten years after her precipitous entry onto the international stage, Aperture is delighted to publish Illuminance, the latest volume of Kawauchis work and the first to be published outside of Japan. Kawauchis work has frequently been lauded for its nuanced palette and offhand compositional mastery, as well as her ability to incite wonder via careful attention to tiny gestures and the incidental details of her everyday environment. In Illuminance, Kawauchi continues her exploration of the extraordinary in the mundane, drawn to the fundamental cycles of life and the seemingly inadvertent, fractal-like organization of the natural world into formal patterns. This impressive compilation of previously unpublished images is proof of Kawauchis unparalleled, unique sensibility and her on-going appeal to the lovers of photography.

Rinko Kawauchi è uno dei più innovativi talenti della fotografia contemporanea, non solo in Giappone ma anche all’estero. Illuminance edito da Postcart in coedizion e con la newyorkese Aperture, è il primo libro della Kawauchi ad essere pubblicato fuori dal Giappone. Il lavoro di Kawauchi è stato frequentemente elogiato per la sua tavolozza espressiva e delicata al contempo, per la sua abilità nel suscitare meraviglia attraverso una premurosa attenzione ai piccoli gesti e a quei dettagli casuali della vita quotidiana. In Illuminance, Kawauchi prosegue la sua esplorazione dello “straordinario nell’ordinario”, estraendo dal mondo naturale la sua forza poetica e rendendola manifesta attraverso composizioni “illuminanti”. con un testo di David Chandler

Murmuration presents a new Photoworks commission by acclaimed Japanese photographer Rinko Kawauchi for the Brighton Photo Biennial 2010, New Documents, curated by Martin Parr. Invited to make new work about Brighton, Kawauchi was immediately drawn to the spectacle of flocking starlings at Brighton Pier. Here during the winter months at dusk, the birds gather in tens of thousands, wheeling around to create a mesmerizing cloud called a ‘murmuration’. Kawauchi is fascinated by the ephemeral nature of this phenomenon and, continuing with the theme of the flock, she has also trailed groups of people through the city. Published on the occasion of the exhibition Strange and Familiar: Three Views of Brighton at the Brighton Museum and Art Gallery, 2 October – 14 November 2010. Limited edition.

Second collection of photographs in Kawauchis trilogy of photo books which depict the photographers vision of different fireworks (hanabi) shows.

Carps, clouds, a curtain, a tire, fried eggs, a grandfather, a butterfly. These are the  details of the everyday life that are too easily missed. Seen through the lens of Kawauchis camera however, the ordinary shines with patterns of light; even an ant transforms into a statement of style. This thoughtful debut photo book won awards for its graceful contemplation of mortality (no text in book).

Sheets attempts to retrace Rinko Kawauchi’s steps in this world through a reassembly and re-editing of her filmstrips as a reinvented whole. Cinematographic at heart, the sequences of randomly selected contact sheets offer a real-life time lapse, a resurrection of moments in the personal history of the artist and immortalised in some of her more significant publications. The book’s gatefolds mark intervals in this rhythmic crescendo. They contribute, as if under a magnifying glass, to new spontaneous pairings of images. It is all here, fragment by fragment, the elements and patterns of a primal cosmogony of varied affective nuances with their connotations of transcendental immanence—a palimpsest of the everyday that Kawauchi brings together with such astounding ease as if the flow of juxtaposing images were as natural to her as her own biological path in life. This book contains a selection of contact sheets that spans more than a decade of works.

The title of Rinko Kawauchi’s latest work, Ametsuchi, is comprised of two Japanese characters meaning »heaven and earth,« and is taken from the title of one of the oldest pangrams in Japanese – a chant in which each character of the Japanese syllabary is used. Translated loosely as »Song of the Universe,« it offers a list that includes the heavens, earth, stars, and mountains. In the series Kawauchi brings together images of distant constellations and tiny figures lost within landscapes, as well as photographs of a traditional style of controlled-burn farming (yakihata) in which the cycles of cultivation and recovery span decades and generations. The book is designed by award-winning Dutch designer Hans Gremmen, who brings a sense of the monumental and the mysterious to the design with a seductive origami binding. The series is Kawauchi’s first to be fully realized with a medium-format, 4 x 5 camera, instead of the 2-1/4-inch format for which she has become best known. Rinko Kawauchi (b. 1972 in Shiga, Japan) has had solo exhibitions at Fondation Cartier, Paris; Photographers’ Gallery, London; and Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography; among other venues. She was shortlisted for the 2012 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize. She lives and works in Tokyo.

The title of Rinko Kawauchi’s latest work, Ametsuchi, is comprised of two Japanese characters meaning »heaven and earth,« and is taken from the title of one of the oldest pangrams in Japanese – a chant in which each character of the Japanese syllabary is used. Translated loosely as »Song of the Universe,« it offers a list that includes the heavens, earth, stars, and mountains. In the series Kawauchi brings together images of distant constellations and tiny figures lost within landscapes, as well as photographs of a traditional style of controlled-burn farming (yakihata) in which the cycles of cultivation and recovery span decades and generations. The book is designed by award-winning Dutch designer Hans Gremmen, who brings a sense of the monumental and the mysterious to the design with a seductive origami binding. The series is Kawauchi’s first to be fully realized with a medium-format, 4 x 5 camera, instead of the 2-1/4-inch format for which she has become best known. Rinko Kawauchi (b. 1972 in Shiga, Japan) has had solo exhibitions at Fondation Cartier, Paris; Photographers’ Gallery, London; and Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography; among other venues. She was shortlisted for the 2012 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize. She lives and works in Tokyo.

Beautiful and serene, Kawauchis postcard series of marine creatures swimming in Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium, Japan, is a feast for the eyes. Majun in Okinawa dialect means be together.

A collection of photographs taken from everyday situations juxtaposed with short whispery poetical texts from a photographer who is increasingly attracting wider international attention.

Snowflake Twelfth is inspired by Snowflake by Paul Gallico. Snowflake is the story of a snowflake and an allegory of life. It is a delicate body of work in a delicate package. The book is small zine with an acetate cover, inside is a small booklet with text from Snowflake in Japanese and English held in place by a tied ribbon.

n 2001, Rinko Kawauchi launched her career with the simultaneous publication of three astonishing photobooksUtatane, Hanabi, and Hanakofirmly establishing her as one of the most innovative newcomers to contemporary photography, not just in Japan, but across the globe. In the years that followed, she published other notable monographs, including Aila (2004), The Eyes, the Ears (2005), and Semear (2007). And now, ten years after her precipitous entry onto the international stage, Aperture is delighted to publish Illuminance, the latest volume of Kawauchis work and the first to be published outside of Japan. Kawauchis work has frequently been lauded for its nuanced palette and offhand compositional mastery, as well as her ability to incite wonder via careful attention to tiny gestures and the incidental details of her everyday environment. In Illuminance, Kawauchi continues her exploration of the extraordinary in the mundane, drawn to the fundamental cycles of life and the seemingly inadvertent, fractal-like organization of the natural world into formal patterns. This impressive compilation of previously unpublished images is proof of Kawauchis unparalleled, unique sensibility and her on-going appeal to the lovers of photography.

Japanese photographer Rinko Kawauchis work is marked by its serene and poetic style. She often depicts the ordinary moments in life, concentrating attention on what might otherwise be overlooked or taken for granted. Her images contain a sense of openness; liberated from the restriction that photography is just a documentary. In producing her images, the questions of when or where do not play a role, freeing them from limitations of time and space and allowing the viewer access to the universal visual languages they communicate. Between Heaven and Earth On Rinko Kawauchi, an essay by Tetsuro Ishida, completes this simple and elegant collection of her work.

Opere di/Works by Evan Baden, Carla Cerati, Philippe Chancel, Thierry Cohen, Stefano D’Amadio, Cristina De Middel, Julia Fullerton-Batten, Andrea Galvani, Lucia Ganieva, Luigi Gariglio, Paul Graham, Rinko Kawauchi, Esko Mànnikkò, Tim Parchikov, Anders Petersen, Alessandro Rizzi, Mick Rock, Lise Sarfati, Sergey Shestakov, Viktoria Sorochinski, Hannah Starkey, David Stewart, Hellen van Meene, Weegee, Raimond Wouda, Tobias Zielony. Testi di/Texts by Alessandro Bartoli, Cosimo Bizzarri, Ginevra Bompiani, Fabio Boni, Ilaria Campioli, Fabrizio Cicconi, Piero Del Giudice, Duygu Demir, Laura Gasparini, Elio Grazioli, Walter Guadagnini, Francis Hodgson, Dzevad Karahasan, Carlo Massarini, Rossella Menegazzo, Marinella Paderni, Riccardo Panattoni, Sandro Parmiggiani, Laura Sassi, Tiziano Scarpa, Ilaria Schiaffini, Laura Serani, Olga Sviblova, Brian Wallis.

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