Contents: Klüver, “The Pavilion” and “Photographic Recording of Some Optical Effects,” Lindgren, “Into the Collaboration,” Rose, “Art as Experience, Environment, Process,” Tomkins, “Outside Art,” Gamier, “An Overview,” Nakaya, “Making of ‘Fog’ or Low-hanging Stratus Cloud,” Mee, “Notes and Comments on Clouds and Fog,” Pichel, “Brief Discussion of Searchlight Concepts,” Young, “To Aim a Sunbeam by Mirrors,” Cross, “Laser Deflection System,” Mumma, “A Brief Introduction to the Sound-Modifier Console,” Gamier, “Optics of Spherical Mirrors,” Pearce, “An Architect’s View,” and Pan, “Software.” Also contains Proposals for Live Programming by Kiyoshi Awazu, Remy Charlip, Lowell Cross, Sandy Daley and Nicholas Quennell, John Forkner, Red Grooms, Ann Halprin, Harry Harper and Jacquelyn Farrell, Takumi Kijikata, Allan Kaprow, Takehisa Kosugi, Alvin Lucier, Anthony Martin, Rikuro Miyai, Gordon Mumma, Pauline Oliveros and Lynn Lonidier, Terry Riley, Yuji Takahashi, Shuji Terayama, Yoshiaki Tono, Yoshi Tsukio, Masanobu Yoshimura, and La Monte Young, Marian Zazeela, and Robert Adler.

Exhibition catalogue published in conjunction with Art Metropole’s 10th Anniversary exhibition held November 17 – December 8, 1984. Designed by AA Bronson. Text by AA Bronson, John Goodwin, Christina Ritchie, and Peggy Gale. Includes an exhibition checklist and an Art Metropole chronology from 1974 – 1984. Indexes works by: Vito Acconci, Vincenzo Agnetti, Shelagh Alexander, Laurie Anderson, Carl Andre, Ant Farm, Eleanor Antin, Ida Applebroog, Shusaka Arakawa, Ryan Arnott, Robert Ashley, David Askevold, Alice Aycock, John Baldessari, Robert Barry, Carole Gallagher, Luciano Bartolini, Lothar Baumgarten, Joseph Beuys, Caroline Tisdall, Dara Birnbaum, Mel Bochner, Alighiero Boetti, Christian Boltanski, Pierre Boogaerts, Jonathan Borofsky, Brad Brace, George Brecht, Hans Breder, Marcel Broodthaers, Stanley Brouwn, David Buchan, Hank Bull, Daniel Buren, Victor Burgin, Michael Buthe, James Lee Byars, Richard C., Miriam Cahn, John Cage, Ulises Carrion, James Casebere, Sarah Charlesworth, Sandro Chia, Giuseppe Chiari, Robert Christo, Collective Chromazone, Heinz Cibulka, Francesco Clemente, James Collins, Claudio Costa, Robert Cumming, Greg Curnoe, Hanne Darboven, Lowel D. Darling, Juan Da Villa, Constance De Jong, Tom Dean, Mario Diacono, Antonio Dias, Jan Dibbets, Martin Disler, Jean Dubuffet, Marcel Duchamp, Mary Beth Edelson, Kit Edwards, Felipe Ehrenberg, Valie Export, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Robert Filliou, A.M. Fine, Hervé Fischer, Joel Fisher, Copp Fletcher, Robert Fones, Ken Friedman, Hamish Fulton, Phillip Galgiani, Eldon Garnet, Gilbert and George, Jochen Gerz, Michael Gibbs, Jon Gibson, Oliver Girling, Randy Gledhill, Tom Graff, Dan Graham, John Greer, Walther Gutman, Hans Haacke, Dieter Hacker, Noel Harding, Keith Haring, Stephen Harris, Matt Harley, Michael Heizer, Gerard Hemsworth, Jan Herman, Geoff Hendricks, Dick Higgins, Susan Hiller, Hans Hollein, Jenny Holzer, Rebecca Horn, Douglas Huebler, Sonja Ivekovic, Jasper Johns, Ray Johnson, Joe Jones, On Kawara, Anselm Kiefer, Kijkhuis, Yves Klein, John Knight, Richard Kostelanetz, Joseph Kosuth, Jannis Kounellis, Les Krims, David Lamelas, Bernard Lassus, Vera Lemecha, Les Levine, Sol LeWitt, Tina Lhotsky, Roy Lichtenstein, Colin Lochhead, Richard Long, Robert Longo, Nino Longobardi, Urs Luthi, George Maciunas, Allan Mackay, David MacWilliam, Paul Maenz, Arnaud Maggs, Liz Magor, John Massey, Hansjorg Mayer, Bruce McLean, Sandra Meigs, Mario Merz, Eric Metcalfe, Phillip Monk, Michael Morris, Muntadas, Ian Murray, Norman Ogue Mustill, Maurizio Nannucci, Opal L. Nations, Bruce Nauman, Linda Neaman, Al Neil, Hermann Nitsch, Barbara Noah, Arlene Golant, Claes Oldenburg, Luigi Ontani, Dennis Oppenheim, Nam June Paik, Giulio Paolini, Andy Patton, Steve Paxton, A.R. Penck, Giuseppe Penone, Bern Porter, Royden Rabinowitch, Marcus Rätz, Steve Reich, Lothar Reiners, James Riddle, David Rosenberg, Martha Rosler, Dieter Rot, Ed Ruscha, Lawerence Weiner, Reiner Ruthenbeck, Jim de Sana, Lucas Samaras, Bernd Schmitz, Carolee Schneemann, Rudolf Schwarzkogler, Kurt Schwitters, Tom Sherman, Chieko Shiomi, Seth Siegelaub, Jack Wendler, Michael Snow, Valerie Solanas, Daniel Spoerri, Klaus Staeck, Ernesto Tatafiore, Paul Thek, Edwin Klein, Vincent Trasov, John Mitchell, Richard Tuttle, Cy Twombly, Ulay, Roland Van Den Berghe, M. Vaughan-James, Ben Vautier, Bernar Venet, Claudio Verna, Wolf Vostell, Martin Walde, Jeff Wall, Duane Lunden, Ian Wallace, Andy Warhol, Robert Watts, George Whiteside, Robert Wiens, Stephan Willats, Emmett Williams, Martha Wilson, Robert Wilson, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Va Wölfl, Peter Wronski, Donna Wyszomierski, Keigo Yammamoto, La Monte Young, and R. Zybert.

“California occupies a leading role in the development and practice of performance as a contemporary form of visual art. PERFORMANCE ANTHOLOGY offers an extraordinary documentation of the California performance activity which flourished throughout the decade of the seventies. Included in this anthology are a chronological bibliography of major books, journal essays and reviews, artists’ books, catalogues, and marginal works; introductions and original essays by artists and leading historians and critics of performance art in California; photographs illustrating major performance works by California artists. “The artists represented in this anthology include: Ant Farm, Eleanor Antin, Chris Burton, Paul Cotton, Terry Fox, Howard Fried, Lynn Hershman, Allan Kaprow, The Kipper Kids, Paul Kos, Suzanne Lacy, Tom Marioni, Paul McCarthy, Linda Montano, Bruce Nauman, Darryl Sapien, Bonnie Sherk, Barbara Smith, T.R. Uthco, and John White, among many others. Performance art situations include: Museum of Conceptual Art, Los Angeles Institute of Contemporary Art, Floating Museum, La Mamelle Inc., Some Serious Business, The Woman’s Building, 80 Langton St., and others.”

Edited by Lawrence Kumpf. Contributors and featured artists include Onyx Ashanti, Amy Cimini, Marcia Douglas, Kazuo Imai, Werner Durand, Peter Gente, Heidi Paris, Robert Ashley, “Blue” Gene Tyranny, Spencer Gerhardt, Adrian Rew, Paul Cummings, and Walter De Maria. Taking its name from Maryanne Amacher’s visionary, unrealized opera, the fourth issue of Blank Forms’ journal, Intelligent Life, features a select group of unpublished, newly translated, or otherwise rare texts that augment our organization’s concerts, publications, exhibitions, and archival initiatives. The issue opens with a short literary essay by the author Marcia Douglas, in which a deep bass riddim guides a deaf narrator and a reincarnated Bob Marley through important sites in Rastafarianism’s development. Next come two interviews with crucial (though very different) figures in postwar avant-garde music: the Japanese guitarist Kazuo Imai and the American composer Robert Ashley, along with pianist and frequent collaborator “Blue” Gene Tyranny. The previously unpublished interview with Imai was conducted by Blank Forms’ Editor and Artistic Director Lawrence Kumpf during Imai’s first trip to the United States, in 2018, and finds the artist reflecting on recent work with the collective Marginal Consort as well as his foundational experiences playing with two other titans of Japanese experimentalism, Takehisa Kosugi and Masayuki Takayanagi. The interview with Ashley and “Blue” Gene, meanwhile, first published in German in 1984 on the occasion of a staging of Ashley’s opera Atalanta, was translated for the first time into English for this publication. Intelligent Life continues with a series of longer pieces showcasing a diverse set of complex practices and histories, beginning with that of Detroit-based artist Onyx Ashanti. Onyx contributes his own Octavia Butler-referencing “sonocybernetic manifesto,” first published online in 2016, which exists simultaneously as theoretical treatise, memoir, and practical guide to his idiosyncratic technology-based practice. The manifesto is bolstered in this issue by a rare and extensive interview, conducted by Blank Forms’ Curatorial Assistant Adrian Rew in 2018. Following this exploration of Onyx’s life and work, the issue dives deeper into mathematics, with a comprehensive essay on Catherine Christer Hennix’s engagement with intuitionism and other esoteric approaches to math, written by the mathematician and musician Spencer Gerhardt. Gerhardt’s lucid, previously unpublished essay serves as a necessary complement to Blank Forms Editions’ forthcoming collection of Hennix’s abstruse, mostly unpublished body of writing, Poësy Matters and Other Matters. The issue continues with a sort of titular essay, a rich analysis of Amacher’s Intelligent Life—the first such piece on this work—by Amacher scholar Amy Cimini. An incredibly prescient work that sought to upend any remaining vestiges of traditional operatic form and staging, Intelligent Life tells the story, set in 2021, of employees at Supreme Connections LLC, a futurist sonic entertainment corporation that formed following the collapse of a failed algorithmic music recommendation service. Cimini traces the technical and theoretical innovations with which Amacher imbued the work, situating it amid a detailed explication of Amacher’s still-overlooked practice. Intelligent Life—the journal issue—then concludes with a lengthy interview with the artist Walter De Maria. One of the few interviews De Maria gave in his lifetime, this one, created for the Archives of American Art in 1972, sheds significant light on De Maria’s early intellectual and artistic development as well as his work as a musician. Although he largely stopped playing music by 1970, and although few recordings of his efforts exist, De Maria played alongside musicians ranging from Lou Reed to Don Cherry to Henry Flynt, establishing himself early on as a force in jazz and avant-garde circles in both the Bay Area and New York City. Taken together, the texts compiled here present a kaleidoscopic view of the last fifty years of experimental art and music in the United States and beyond, mining the conceptual, technical, historical, or otherwise marginal details undergirding artists’ lives, ideas, and approaches that may otherwise remain buried.

Nello straordinario spazio della Certosa di Padula, la più grande d’Europa, luogo sublime, ricco di storia, cultura e spiritualità, ha trovato vita “Le Opere e i Giorni”, manifestazione culturale ideata da Achille Bonito Oliva e dalla Soprintendenza ai Beni Artistici e Storici di Salerno, finanziata con fondi europei dalla Regione Campania. La straordinaria manifestazione ha rianimato la bellezza delle antiche celle certosine, dei giardini e dei meravigliosi camminamenti, mostrando la genesi e lo sviluppo dell’opera d’arte nel tempo: dal momento creativo alla realizzazione, dall’allestimento all’esposizione. Il percorso artistico si è svolto nel triennio 2002-2004 su tre temi, uno per ciascun anno: il Verbo, lavori sui linguaggi dell’arte; il Precetto, inteso come osservazione della consuetudine monastica, come regola per il processo creativo dell’artista; la Vanitas, come caducità della bellezza, punto cardine della regola certosina, ma essenza stessa dell’arte contemporanea e sfida al tempo nel rapporto tra creatività, morte e vita. Le mostre hanno visto la partecipazione di Mario Airò, Ghada Amer, Arresa dei conti, Maja Bajevic, Nanni Balestrini, Per Barclay, Massimo Bartolini, Betty Bee, Elisabetta Benassi, Carlo Benvenuto, Monica Biancardi, Bianco e Valente, Gregorio Botta, Antonio Caggiano, Maurizio Cannavacciuolo, Pietro Capogrosso, Gianni Caravaggio, Letizia Cariello, Patrizia Cavalli, Loris Cecchini, Sandro Chia, Paolo Chiasera, Enzo Cucchi, Alvin Curran, Ousmane Ndiaye Dago, Nicola De Maria, Mario Dellavedova, Alessandro Diaz de Santillana, Baldo Diodato, Ilaria Drago, Rocco Dubini, Isabella Ducrot, Maurizio Elettrico, Jan Fabre, Federico Fusi, Alberto Garutti, Gianandrea Gazzola, Pia Gazzola, Kendell Geers, Isabella Gherardi, Robert Gligorov, Piero Golia, Anish Kapoor, Thorsten Kirchoff, Mark Kostabi, Dino Innocente, Emilio Isgrò, Benedetta Jacovoni, Mimmo Jodice, Myriam La Plante, Sol LeWitt, H.H. Lim, Rosaria Lo Russo, Renato Mambor, Amedeo Martegani, Fabio Mauri, Dörte Meyer, MK, Gian Marco Montesano con Giulia Basel, Liliana Moro, Paul Morrisey e Veruschka, Hidetoschi Nagasawa, Raffaella Nappo, Moataz Nasr, Luigi Ontani, Tommaso Ottonieri, Nam June Paik, Mimmo Paladino e Toni Servillo, Luca Pancrazzi, Luca Maria Patella, Perino & Vele, Alfredo Pirri, Vettor e Mimma Pisani, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Maria Pizzi, Antonio Rezza con Flavia Mastrella, Lucia Ronchetti, Marialba Russo, Virginia Ryan, Saint Clair Cemin, Renato Salvadori, Franco Scaldati, Franco Scognamiglio, Lorenzo Scotto di Luzio, Elisa Sighicelli, Roberta Silva, Grazia Toderi, Adrian Tranquilli, Marianna Troise, Franco Vaccari, Wainer Vaccari, Franz West con Tamura Sirbiladze, Sisley Xhafa, Alessandra Vanzi, Lello Voce, Giuseppe Zevola, Zerynthia, Gilberto Zorio, Natalino Zullo.

This book presents 123 calling cards of artists (painters, sculptors, photographers, architects, graphic designers, illustrators etc.) from the 18th century to the present day. The facsimiled cards are slipped like bookmarks into a book by several authors on the history of the use of calling cards, the social context in which they were produced, and related historical and fictional narratives. The often unexpected graphic qualities of these personalized objects, each designed to capture an individual identity within the narrow confines of a tiny rectangle card, implicitly recount a history of taste and typographic codes in the West. But this calling card collection also lays the foundations for a microhistory of art, inspired by the Italian microstoria, or a looser narrative that breaks free from geographic contexts and historical periods. We can imagine how social networks were formed before the advent of Facebook, and how artists defined themselves in the social sphere, whether they were students or teachers, dean of the art school or museum curator, founder of a journal, firm, restaurant or political party, and so on. Superimposed on this imaginary or idealized network formed by chance encounters is a living network of students of art or history, historians or anthropologists, librarians, archivists, gallerists, museum curators and artists themselves, the network upon which this pocket museum is constructed. The sheer variety of perspectives and stories brought together here makes this book a prodigious forum for discussion. The carded artists include: Absalon, Anni and Josef Albers, John Armleder, Iain Baxter, Larry Bell, Joseph Beuys, Joseph Binder, Max Bill, Pierrette Bloch, Rosa Bonheur, Irma Boom, Aglaüs Bouvenne, Constantin Brancusi, Marcel Broodthaers, Antonio Canova, Caran d’Ache, A.M. Cassandre, Chenue malletier, Iris Clert, Claude Closky, Le Corbusier, Silvie Défraoui, Sonia Delaunay, Fortunato Depero, Marcel Duchamp, A.R. Dunton, Céline Duval, Nathalie Du Pasquier, Yan Duyvendak, Daniel Eatock, Edward Fella, Sylvie Fleury, Schwestern Flöge, Piero Fornasetti, Hans Frank, Lene Frank, Emile Gallé, General Idea, Dan Graham, Wolfgang von Gœthe, Jean-Baptiste Greuze, Walter Gropius, Guerrilla Girls, Hector Guimard, Friedrich Haeffcke, Raymond Hains, Keith Haring, Raoul Hausmann, John Heartfield, Anton Herrgesell, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Ray Johnson, Ana Jotta, Wassily Kandinsky, André Kertész, Martin Kippenberger, Paul Klee, Johann Adam Klein, Yves Klein, Július Koller, Joseph Kosuth, Yayoi Kusama, Carl Gotthard Langhans, Fernand Léger, Pierre Leguillon, George Maciunas, Robert Mallet-Stevens, Edouard Manet, Piero Manzoni, Christian Marclay, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Karel Martens, Annette Messager, Lucia Moholy, Piet Mondrian, Valérie Mréjen, Félix Nadar, Isamu Noguchi, The Offices of Jenny Holzer, Peter Nadin, Richard Prince and al., Yoko Ono, Claes Oldenburg, Nam June Paik, Francis Picabia, Adrian Piper, Emil Pirchan, Man Ray, Les ready made appartiennent à tout le monde®, Carl August Reinhardt, Gerrit Rietveld, Auguste Rodin, Edward Ruscha, Alexander Search, Willem Sandberg, Erik Satie, Gino Severini, Johan Gottfried Schadow, Egon Schiele, Oskar Schlemmer, Käthe Schmidt, Roman Signer, Alec Soth, Gertrude Stein and Alice Toklas, Jack Smith, Hélène Smith, Harald Szeemann, Sophie Taeuber, Karel Teige, Oliviero Toscani, Theo van Doesburg, Roman Vishniac, Andy Warhol, Weegee, Neill Whistler, Heimo Zobernig, Piet Zwart, Emmy Zweybrück Prochaska With texts by: Samuel Adams, Damarice Amao, Daniel Baumann, Stuart Bertolotti-Bailey, Géraldine Beck, Paul Bernard, Christian Besson, Christianna Bonin, Véronique Borgeaud, Marie de Brugerolle, Garance Chabert, Kyrill Charbonnel, Yann Chateigné, Manuel Cirauqui, Chiara Costa, Caroline Coutau, Jean-Baptiste Delorme, Carla Demierre, Dakota DeVos, Corinne Diserens, Eva Fabbris, Patricia Falguières, Arthur Fink, Sophie Gayerie, Kati Gegenheimer, Mark Thomas Gibson, Nicolas Giraud, Victor Guégan, Andrea Gyorody, Nastassja Haidinger, Dean Inkster, Aurélie Jacquet, Elisabeth Jobin, Vincent Jolivet, Moritz Küng, Angela Lampe, Charlotte Laubard, Anaël Lejeune, Quentin Lannes, Pierre Leguillon, Charlotte Magnin, Nicole Marchand-Zañartu, Valérie Mavridorakis, Aurélien Mole, Michael J. Moore, Adrien Mouginot, Christiane Mühlegger, Émilie Parendeau, Ying Sze Pek, Corine Pencenat, Mathias Pfund, Fabien Pinaroli, Raphaël Pirenne, Paulo Pires do Vale, Carrie Pilto, Frans Postma, Jeanne Quéheillard, Fabienne Radi, Ivan Ristić, Vincent de Roguin, Paul-Louis Roubert, Margot Sanitas, Gilles Saussier, Elana Shapira, Klaus-Peter Speidel, Friedrich Tietjen, Rebecca Topakian, Gesine Tosin, Xiaoda Wang, Christophe Wavelet, David Zerbib, Célia Zuber.
Co-published by HEAD – Genève (Geneva University of Art and Design) and Edition Patrick Frey under the patronage of the Museum of Mistakes Editors: Pierre Leguillon in collaboration with Barbara Fédier and Kyrill Charbonnel, Pauline Cordier, Aurélie Jacquet, Aline Melaet, Anaïs Perez, and Charlotte Schaer, students of WorkMaster at HEAD – Genève

Until sometime in the 1980s, playgrounds were places for social experiments, risky projects and spectacular sculptures. Architects, urban planners, artists, parents and children were invited to leave their comfort zones and to venture something new in the design and use of playgrounds. The Playground Project explores these exemplary initiatives, pioneering acts and adventures in designing modern childhood. Examples from Europe, the US, Japan and India are discussed in depth and illustrated with numerous images. Truly a comprehensive overview, this volume includes works by artists, architects and landscape architects such as Marjory Allen, Joseph Brown, Riccardo Dalisi, Richard Dattner, Aldo van Eyck, M. Paul Friedberg, Group Ludic (Xavier de la Salle, Simon Koszel, David Roditi), Alfred Ledermann and Alfred Trachsel, Palle Nielsen, Egon Møller-Nielsen, Isamu Noguchi, Joseph Schagerl, Mitsuru Senda and Carl Theodor Sørensen. Swiss political scientist and urban planner Gabriela Burkhalter contributes an introduction, and essays by Xavier de la Salle, Sreejata Roy and Vincent Romagny investigate the stakes of the architectural and artistic experiments surveyed. The first comprehensive overview of this kind, The Playground Project addresses laymen as well as experts who want to do more on the playground than just seesaw and swing.

Compiled by Scott Helmes, Richard Kostelanetz and David Cole A collaborative magazine of the unpublished and unpublishable, of works too eccentric to be accepted elsewhere. With work by Blair Allen, John Bennett, Alan Coleman, Fred Escher, Pat Fish, Sue Fishbein, Michael Hazard, John Marrow, Richard Meltzer, Bern Porter, Lon Spiegelman, Chuck Welch (Crackerjack Kid), Paul Zelavansky and many more.

#1 “The Opening Salvo” Richard Kostelanetz and Henry Korn, editors (1970) “Assembling: A cooperative annual magazine of the unpublished and the unpublishable – selected and printed by the contributors. Compiled by Richard Kostelanetz and Henry James Korn… Contributors were invited to submit 1000 copies of up to four 8.5 x 11 in. pages of anything they wanted to include, printed at their own expense on any paper by any means…” – from introduction. Contributions to this issue include original works by Vito Acconci, Tom Ahern, Arakawa, Lee Baxandall, Gay Beste, George Chambers, Marvin Cohen, Regina Cohen, Mad Dog, Raymond Federman, Rosalie Frank, Paul Friedman, Madeline Gins, Elizabet Ginsberg, Dan Graham, Aime Rene Groulx, Jan Jacob Herman, Roni Hoffman, Scott Hyde, David Ignatow, Arno Karlen, Lynn P. Kohl, Henry J. Korn, Richard Kostelanetz, Robert Lax, Arthur Layzer, Bernadett Mayer, Carole S. McCauley, Peter Melnick, Richard Meltzer, Michael Metz, Elana Nachman, Liam O’Gallagher, Michael J. Phillips, Edward Ruscha, Alan Sondheim, Ronald M. Spatz, K. & R. Waldrop, Nancy Weber, Hannah Weiner, Steve Welte, Stephen Wiest

Exhibition catalogue published in conjunction with show held at the Allen Art Museum, Oberlin College, Ohio, April 17 – May 12, 1970. Introduction by Athena T. Spear. Artists include Vito Acconci, Siah Armajani, Michael Asher, John Baldessari, Robert Barry, Frederick Barthelme, Bill Beckley, Mel Bochner, Jonathan Borofsky, George Brecht, Victor Burgin, Donald Burgy, Ian Burn, Scott Burton, James Lee Byars, Luis Camnitzer, Rosemarie Castoro, Don Celender, Fred Cornell Cone, Christpher Cook, Eduardo Costa, Robert Cumming, Roger Cutforth, Royce Dendler, David Dunlap, David Eisler, Robert Feke, Rafael Ferrer, George Gladstone, Dan Graham, Ira Joel Haber, Richards Jarden, On Kawara, Michael Kirby, Paul Kos, Joseph Kosuth, R. Rexinger Lau, Barry Le Va, Les Levine, Gleen Lewis, Sol LeWitt, Martin Maloney, Bruce McLean, Bruce Nauman, N.E. Thing Co., Ltd., Claes Oldenburg, Saul Ostrow, Paul Pechter, John Perreault, Adrian Piper, Mel Ramsden, Glen Rea, Allen Ruppersberg, Thomas Duncan Shannon, Society for Theoretical Art and Analyses, Marjorie Strider, John Van Saun, Bernar Venet, Jeffrey Wall, William Wegman, Hannah Weiner, Lawrence Weiner, and David Nelson. Includes a range of documents, from drawings and sketches to writing and project proposals and outlines. In black-and-white.

A collection of artists’ books by: Marina Abramovic, Carl Andre, Robert Barry, Douglas Huebler, Joseph Kosuth, Robert Morris, Ida Applebroog, Armando, Sophie Taeuber-Arp, Jean Arp, Richard Artschwager, Enrico Baj, Guido Ballo, John Baldessari, Miroslaw Balka,Balthus, Georg Baselitz, Marius Bauer, Merina Beekman, Joseph Beuys, Marcel Broodthaers, David Bunn, Chris Burden, Eduardo Chillida, Catherine Claeyé, Francesco Clemente, Chuck Close, Jean Cocteau, George Hugnet, Bruce Conner, Michael Craig-Martin, Olafur Eliasson, Max Ernst, Yves Tanguy, Tristan Tzara, Anya Gallaccio, Ryan Gander, Alberto Giacometti, Gilbert & George, Pim van Halem, Jonathan Hammer, Sjoerd Hofstra, John Billingham, Jörg Immendorf, Xu Pei, Rein Jansma, Jasper Johns, Ellsworth Kelly, Paul Klee, Jannis Kounellis, Barbara Kruger, Stephen King, André Lanskoy, Henri Laurens, Richard Long, Kasper Andreasen, Tine Melzer, Christien Meindertsma, Sophie Calle , Constant Nieuwenhuys / Gerrit Kouwenaar, Guiseppe Penone, Sigmar Polke, Ken Price / Charles Bukowski, Robert Rauschenberg, David Sandlin, Koosje Schmeddes, Sean Scully, Kiki Smith, Nicolas de Staël, Antoni Tàpies, Andrea Tippel, Richard Tuttle, Damian van der Velden, herman de vries, Hans Waanders, Kara Walker, Alicja Werbachowska, Christopher Wool, Raymond Pettibon, Paul Éluard, Marino Marini, Alicia Martin, Paul McCarthy, Jason Roades, Jack Milroy, René Char, Henry Moore, Robert Motherwell, Octavio Paz, Roman Ondak, Henk Peeters, Edward Ruscha, Man Ray, Louise Bourgeois, Sonia Delaunay, Wassily Kandinsky, Ellsworth Kelly, Joan Miró, Fernand Leger, Sol LeWitt, Henry Matisse, A.R. Penck, Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol and Lawrence Weiner.

The religious movements of today no longer depend on the handselling of literature such as bibles, pamphlets etc, but instead operate predominantly with electronic picture media such as video and television that can be disseminated much more widely, and which are capable of enormous rhetorical impact. Medium Religionapproaches religion as a media phenomenon, whose expressions are subject to the same laws of reproduction as any other consumer entity, and focuses particularly on geopolitical religious hotspots like the Middle East, Asia, Russia, North America and South America. It contains commentary by (among others) such notable thinkers as Boris Groys, Peter Sloterdijk and Slavoj Zizek; contributing artists include Adel Abdessemed, Oreet Ashery, Maja Bajevic, Paul Chan, Omer Fast, Barbad Golshiri, Kajri Jain, Vitali Komar, Alexander Kosolapov, Nira Pereg, Dorna Safaian, Anri Sala, Michael Schuster, Wael Shawky, Joshua Simon and Jalal Toufic.

Presenting unique and in-depth collaborations and editions with leading international artists, Parkett No. 67 features John Bock (Germany), Peter Doig (Great Britain) and Fred Tomaselli (United States of America). John Bock’s hypnotic and clownish lectures–his signature artistic medium–mix language, social theory, dramatic elements, history and fairy tales, among other things. He performs on stage-like structures made from household furniture and multi-level wooden platforms while constructing handmade sculptures out of clothing, household appliances and other common materials. Contributing writers on Bock are independent curator Jens Hoffmann, Daniel Birnbaum, director of Portikus in Frankfurt, and art critic Jan Avgikos. Peter Doig’s paintings are at once romantic and nostalgic. With a vaguely impressionistic veil, he turns representational imagery taken from photographs into dream-like abstractions. For Doig authors include art historian Paul Bonaventura, former artistic director of the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, Rudi Fuchs and Kunsthalle Zurich director Beatrix Ruf. Fred Tomaselli makes paintings that incorporate resin, photo-collage, pills, hallucinogenic plants and medicinal herbs in abstract compositions, figurative scenes and fictive landscapes. His multi-layered works (literally and metaphorically) map out the tension between control and chaos: civilization and nature, nature and culture. Dan Cameron, curator at the New Museum of Contemporary Art and curator of the next Istanbul Biennial, writes on Tomaselli, as well as writer Daniel Pinchbeck and Art Institute of Chicago curator James Rondeau. Also in this issue are Sibylle Omlin on Hanne Darboven, Troy Selvaratnam on Simon Starling, Hartmut Bahme on Wang Du, an insert by Canadian artist Marcel Dzama and a new spine designed by Fiona Banner.

The rise of performance art, and its merging with more traditional forms like painting and sculpture, is the great revolution of postwar art. Its links to theater, photography, music, dance, politics, and popular culture have made it especially appealing to contemporary artists in remote areas; more than any other movement in recent art, performance has found a place throughout the world. Covering three decades of significant and original art, this book features work by more than one hundred artists from the United States, South America, Eastern and Western Europe, and Japan who have had a profound impact on the relationship between visual and performance art in the postwar era. Among the artists included are Joseph Beuys, Chris Burden, John Cage, Lygia Clark, Yves Klein, Marta Minujin, Bruce Nauman, Helio Oiticica, Claes Oldenburg, Yoko Ono, Robert Rauschenberg, Niki de Saint Phalle, Atsuko Tanaka, and Jean Tinguely. Their work encompasses performative objects such as sculpture, artists’ publications, drawings, photographs, and ephemera that come from performances, as well as documentary film and video stills. Published in conjunction with a major exhibition, organized by The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, Out of Actions illuminates the unique relationship between action, destruction, performance, and the creative process. Covering an unprecedented range of material, both nationally and temporally, the book offers the first critical comparisons of work that has previously been viewed as distinctly regional and unrelated. With essays by: * Paul Schimmel * Shinichiro Osaki * Hubert Klocker * Kristine Stiles * Guy Brett * Kellie Jones

“L.A. Rising: SoCal Artists Before 1980” is the first comprehensive pictorial showcase of the diverse universe of artists working in the Los Angeles area during the formative period of Los Angeles’ art history. Over 800 color and 100 black and white images of work by almost 500 artists illustrate the edited texts quoted from critical reviews of exhibitions and writings of the period. Special efforts have been made to include both recognized and heretofore unsung key players in the Los Angeles art world. The book acknowledges the legacy of a full range of artists whose lives and work in Los Angeles enabled the city to become the international contemporary art capital it is today.

Contributors: Lyn Kienholz, Elizabeta Betinski, Corinne Nelson, Clinton Adams, Ron Adams, Bas Jan Ader, John Alberty, Lita Albuquerque, Anders Aldrin, Peter Alexander, Martha Alf, Neda Al-Hilali, Carlos Almaraz, John Altoon, Mabel Alvarez, Arthur Ames, Jean Goodwin Ames, Laura Anderson, Oliver Andrews, Eleanor Antin, Craig Antrim, Chuck Arnoldi, Michael Asher, David Askevold, Walter Askin, Ralph Bacerra, Don Bachardy, Jo Baer, Herman Kofi Bailey, George P. Baker, Michael Balog, John Baldessari, Jack Barth, Richmond Barthé, Joel Bass, Lynn Bassler, Robert C. Bassler, Wall Batterton, Herbert Bayer, Phoebe Beasley, Larry Bell, Billy Al Bengston, Karl Benjamin, Ed Bereal, Pat Berger, Tony Berlant, Ben Berlin, Eugene Berman, Wallace Berman, John Bernhardt, Gary Beydler, Edward Biberman, Natalie Bieser, Les Biller, Annette Bird, Streeter Blair, Sandy Bleifer, Bob and Bob, Gloria Cole Bohanen, Douglas Bond, Dorr Bothwell, David Bradford, Rex Brandt, Jerry Brane, Bettina Brendel, Michael Brewster, William Brice, Nicholas Brigante, Morris Broderson, William Theophilus Brown, Nancy Buchanan, Conrad Buff II, David Bungay, Jerry Burchfield, Jerrold Burchman, Chris Burden, Hans Burkhardt, Nathaniel Bustion, JoAnne Callis, Cameron, Greg S. Card, Elaine Carhartt, Harry Carmean, Jae Carmichael, Carol Caroompas, Barbara Carrasco, Eduardo Carrillo, Karen Carson , Bernie Casey, Elizabeth Catlett, Vija Celmins, Roberto Chavez, Carl Cheng, Judy Chicago, Grace Clements, Caron Colvin, Dan Concholar, Houston Conwill, Ron Cooper, Sister Mary Corita, Philip Cornelius, Mary Corse, Eileen Cowin, Robert Cremean, James L. Croak, Keith Crown, William Crutchfield, Robert Cumming, Darryl Curran, Dorit Cypis, Dan Cytron, Edie Danieli, Avery Danziger, Lowell Darling, Paul Darrow, Alonzo Davis, Dale B. Davis, Michael Davis, Ronald Davis, Woods Davy, Guy De Cointet, Francis de Erdely, Rupert Deese, Tony DeLap, Diane Destiny, Boris Deutsch, Charles Dickson, Richard Diebenkorn, Dietrich, Phil Dike, Guy Dill, Laddie John Dill, Paul Dillon, Morton Dimondstein, Sue Dirksen, John Divola, William Dole, James Doolin, Daniel Douke, Robert Dowd, Roy Dowell, Laurence Dreiband, Hildegarde Duane, Tom Eatherton, Bruce Edelstein, Jean Edelstein, Doug Edge, Leonard Edmondson, Melvin Edwards, Jules Engel, Marion Epting, Sam Erenberg, Merion Estes, Ned Evans, Bruce Everett, Fredericl Eversley, Connor Everts, Edgar Ewing, Martin Facey, Claire Falkenstein, Joe Fay, Lorser Feitelson, Lilly Fenichel, Jud Fine, Bruria Finkel, Max Finkelstein, Oskar Fischinger, Ethel Fisher, Judy Fiskin, Robbert Flick, Betty Davenport Ford, Llyn Foulkes, Sam Francis, Magdalena Frimkess, Michael Frimkess, Walter Gabrielson, Simone Gad, Charles Garabedian, John Garrett, Christopher Georgesco, George Geyer, James S. Gill, Shirl Goedike, Betty Gold, Judith Golden, Jack Goldstein, Joe Goode, John S. Gordon, Robert Graham, Mark Greenfield, Scott Grieger, Ron Griffin, Raul Guerrero, Allan Hacklin, Richard Haines, D.J. Hall, Frederick Hammersley, David Hammons, Lloyd Hamrol, Robert Hansen, Marvin Harden, June Harwood, Maren Hassinger, James Hayward, Wayne Alaniz Healy, Phillip Hefferton, Robert Heinecken, Victor Henderson, Maxwell Hendler, George Herms, Anthony Hernandez, Susan Lautman Hertel, Charles Christopher Hill, Gilah Yelin Hirsch, Diana Hobson, David Hockney, Patrick Hogan, Tom Holste, Varnette Honeywood, Dennis Hopper, Channa Horwitz, Bruce Houston, Bernard Hoyes, Douglas Huebler, James Hueter, Robert Irwin, Sandra Jackman, Suzanne Jackson, James Jarvaise, Connie Jenkins, Tom Jenkins, Daniel Larue Johnson, Don Johnson, Wesley Johnson, Ynez Johnston, John Paul Jones, Mary Jones, Reuben Kadish, Steve Kahn, Matsumi Kanemitsu, Allan Kaprow, Barbara Kasten, Craig Kauffman, Claude Kent, Edward Kienholz, The Kipper Kids, Gloria Kisch, Tom Knechtel, Emil Kosa Jr., Peter Krasnow, Patsy Krebs, Roger Kuntz, Suzanne Lacy, Lili Lakich, Paul Landacre, Doyle Lane, William Leavitt, Rico Lebrun, John Lees, Harold Lehman, Mark Lere, Samella Lewis, Peter Liashkov, Joyce Lightbody, Ron Linden

First theorized by composer Richard Wagner, the total artwork, or “gesamtkunstwerk,” proposed a synthesis of all arts towards a single, unified spectacle. Wagner’s ambitious conception flowered in the early twentieth century throughout numerous avant gardes, particularly in German Expressionism, where art forms cross-pollinated and collaborated to a remarkable degree. Past considerations of Expressionism have tended to focus only on individual genres, making The Total Artwork in Expressionism: Art, Film, Literature, Theater, Dance and Architecture 1905-1925the first-ever publication to examine the interplay between these forms. Here, masterpieces of Expressionist film such as Robert Wiene’s The Cabinet of Dr. Caligariare united with set designs; the works of painters and set designers such as Ernst Barlach, Otto Bartning, Otto Dix, George Grosz, Wassily Kandinsky, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Oskar Kokoschka and Ludwig Meidner are examined, alongside film stills by Cesar Klein and Hans Poelzig; and documents by Bruno Taut and Ernst Toller, music scores by Paul Hindemith, poster art, dance masks and stage photographs provide historical and archival background, building a unique panorama of the Expressionist period. Renowned authors, key works and source texts from all disciplines allow the reader to thoroughly experience the ways the genres mutually influenced each other during this revolutionary period.

Exhibition catalogue published in conjunction with Prospect 69 held September 30 – October 12, 1969. Conceived of and organized by Konrad Fischer and Hans Strelow. Edited section by Seth Siegelaub incorporates interviews with Robert Barry, Douglas Huebler, Joseph Kosuth, and Lawrence Weiner conducted individually by themselves. rovides an overview of participating galleries and their artists.
Artists include Bernd & Hilla Becher, Hanne Darboven, Jan Dibbets, Bruno Gronen, Michael Heizer, Sol LeWitt, Richard Long, Reiner Ruthenbeck, and Niele Toroni. Additionally includes full-page images or projects by Robert Smithson (Mirror Displacement, Portland Isle, England, 1969), Charles Ross, Markus Raetz, Jean-Frédéric Schnyder, Jannis Kounellis, Eliseo Mattiacci, Stanley Brouwn, Alighero Bottti (1/2 page), Emilio Prini (1/2 page), Giuseppe Penone (1/2 page), Pier Paolo, Calzolari (1/2 page), E.P. Butler (1/2 page), Eric Orr (1/2 page), James Lee Byars (1/2 page), Paul Cotton (1/2 page), Hans Haacke, Lynda Benglis, Ron Cooper, Doug Wheeler, Giorgio Griffa, David Prentice, a double-page centerfold of blue stripes by Daniel Buren, Dennis Oppenheim, ZAJ-Gruppe, Dick Higgins, Joseph Beuys (photo by Ute Klophaus, David Lamelas, and 13 “Information” pages with advertising

References : “Seth Siegelaub : Beyond Conceptual Art” by Leontine Coelewij, Sara Martinetti, Marja Bloem, Julia Bryan-Wilson, Jo Melvin, Götz Langkau, Matilda McQuaid, Alan Kennedy, Seth Siegelaub. Köln and Amsterdam, Germany / Netherlands : Verlag der Buchandlung Walther König / Stedelijk Museum, 2016, pp. 176-179. “Six Years, The Dematerialization of the Art Object from 1966 to 1972 : A Cross-Reference Book of Information on Some Esthetic Boundaries . / edited and annotated by Lucy R. Lippard.” by Lucy R. Lippard. Praeger Publishers Inc., NY / DC : Praeger Publishers Inc., 1973, pp. 113 – 115.

With the hotly discussed resurgence of painting at the dawn of the new century, it is clear that reports of the medium’s death have been greatly exaggerated. “Painting at the Edge of the World” explores the possibilities of a redefinition and ”hybridization” of painting begun in the 1960s, examining the manifestations of these new artistic vistas in the present day. This full-color catalogue features illustrations and a variety of critical texts by some of the most exciting established and emerging critical voices working today, in addition to work by an international and intergenerational group of artists hailing from places as diverse as Brazil, Ethiopia, Germany, South Africa, Scotland, Japan, Belgium, Iran, Italy, and the United States. Designed in two sections–a gatefold plate section containing reproductions of the work, and a french-folded section containing critical essays–the book brings together a wide range of contemporary views on painting from a diverse array of disciplines, including the visual arts, film, architecture, design, and music in an attempt to assess the relevance of painting in the contemporary global context. In addition, “Painting at the Edge of the World” includes documentation of each artist’s work and an examination of their artistic methodology. Essays by: Daniel Birnbaum, Paulo Herkenhoff, Midori Matsui, Jorg Heiser, Frances Stark, Andrew Blauvelt, Reindaldo Laddaga, Yves-Alain Bois, Helio Oiticica, Takashi Murakami, Mike Kelley, and Cuauhtemoc Medina. Introduction by Douglas Fogle. Featuring artworks by: Franz Ackerman, Haluk Akakçe, Francis Alÿs, Kevin Appel, Marcel Broodthaers, John Currin, Marlene Dumas, Andreas Gursky, Eberhard Havekost, Arturo Herrera, Mike Kelley, Martin Kippenberger, Udomsak Krisanamis, Jim Labie, Margherita Manzelli, Paul McCarthy, Lucy McKenzie, Julie Mehretu, Takashi Murakami, Nader, Chris Ofili, Helio Oiticica, Michael Raedecker, Thomas Scheibitz, Rudolph Stingel, Hiroshi Sugito, Paul Thek, and Richard Wright.

John Cage was one of the most extraordinary and intriguing composers of the twentieth century–or perhaps of any century. His vast corpus of musical compositions, writings, and performances has amazed, amused, bored, enlightened, angered, and fascinated audiences throughout the world. Despite the controversy surrounding his work, there is little disagreement about his role as one of the most important and influential members of the avant-garde. In Writings about John Cage, the renowned Cage expert Richard Kostelanetz has collected the writings of thirty-seven prominent scholars and critics. Selections include articles by the composers Henry Cowell, Peggy Glanville-Hicks, Lou Harrison, Michael Nyman, Virgil Thomson, and Christian Wolff; by literary figures Paul Bowles, John Hollander, and Manfredi Piccolomini; by critics Daniel Charles, Jill Johnston, Edward Rothstein, Calvin Tomkins, and Peter Yates; and by performers Merce Cunningham and Paul Zukofsky. The contributions cover all aspects of Cage’s life and career, including his music, his aesthetics, his prose and poetry, his visual art, and his contributions to modern dance. Richard Kostelanetz is a poet and critic who has written and edited numerous books on aesthetics, the avant-garde, and literature, including The Avant-Garde Tradition in Literature, On Innovative Music(ian)s, The Theatre of Mixed Means, and Esthetics Contemporary. He is the author of The Old Poetries and the New, also published by the University of Michigan Press. His books on Cage include John Cage and Conversing with Cage. “. . . the most intelligently chosen book of writings about Cage that I’ve seen. . . . Kostelanetz is a practiced and gifted anthologist, with the discriminating eye of a litterateur, the sensibility of a poet, and the ear of a musician. . . . . [N]o matter how we read Writings about John Cage, we learn–from intelligent and serious teachers whose writings are worth the effort.”–Institute for Studies in American Music Newsletter “. . . belongs in the library of anyone who is trying to understand and to deal with John Cage.”–Performing Arts Journal

Band 1: malerei, plastik, performance.- Band 2: fotografie film video.- Band 3: handzeichnungen, utopisches design, bücher.- Artsts: Berenice Abbott, Hermann Albert, Carl Andre, Ben d’Armagnac, Christian Ludwig Attersee, Vito Acconci, Pierre Alechinsky, Theo Angelopoulos, Arman (Armand Fernandez), Bernhard Aubertin, Valerio Adami, Gerhard Altenbourg, Ottomar Anschütz, Fernando Arrabal, Joannis Avramidis, Robert Adamson, Robert Altman, Horst Antes, Eduardo Arroyo, Alice Aycock, Peter Ackermann, Anatol, Ant Farm, Art & Language, Billy Adler, Gisela Andersch, Shusaku Arakawa, David Askevold, Chantal Akerman, Laurie Anderson, Diane Arbus, Eugène Atget, Francis Bacon, Monika Baumgartl, Joseph Beuys, Fernando Botero, Kevin Brownlow & Andrew Mollo, Michael Badura, Hippolyte Bayard, Michael von Biel, Margaret Bourke-White, Günter Brus, Eduard Denis Baldús, Thomas Bayrle, Werner Bischof, Mathew B. Brady, Anatol Brosilowsky, Balthus, Cecil Beaton, Louis-Auguste Bisson & Auguste-Rosalie Bisson, Brassaï (Gyula Halász), Wojciech Bruszewski, Joachim Bandau, Bernd e Hilla Becher, Irma Blanck, George Brecht, Luis Buñuel, Jared Bark, Stephan Beck, Karl Blossfeldt, KP Brehmer, Chris Burden, Robert Barry, Bill Beckley, Bernhard Blume, George Hendrik Breitner, Daniel Buren, Jennifer Bartlett, John Ernest Joseph Bellocq, Mel Bochner, Heinz Breloh, Scott Burton, Gianfranco Baruchello, Carmelo Bene, Peter Bogdanovich, Robert Bresson, Michael Buthe, Giorgio Batistella, Franz Bernhard, Claus Böhmler, Stuart Brisley, James Lee Byars, Gerd Baukhage, Jean-Marie Bertholin, Blythe Bohnen, Jürgen Brodwolf, Horst H. Baumann, Nuccio Bertone, Karl Bohrmann, Marcel Broodthaers, Bodo Baumgarten, Jean-Louis Bertucelli, Christian Boltanski, Stanley Brouwn, Enzo Cacciola, Robert Capa, Barbara Chase-Riboud, Pinchas Cohen-Gan, Michael Craig-Martin, Julia Margaret Cameron, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Eduardo Chillida, James Collins, Fritz Cremer, Colin Campell, Étienne Carjat, Christo, Miguel Condé, José Luis Cuevas, Peter Campus, Ugo Carrega, Chryssa, Tony Conrad, Edward Curtis, Louis Cane, Lewis Carroll, Chuck Close, Steven Cortright, Veassis Caniaris, Claude Chabrol, Harold Cohen, Claudio Costa, Miodrag Djuric (Dado), Douglas Davis, Walter De Maria, Jim Dine, Juan Downey, Louis Daguerre, Ger Dekkers, Agnes Denes, Henry + Bool Alfred + John Dixon, Peter Downsborough, Hanne Darboven, Willem de Kooning, Fred Deux, Dore O., Michael Druks, Alan Davie, Philip Henry Delamotte, Jan Dibbets, Ugo Dossi, Marcel Duchamp, John Davies, Jack Delano, Braco Dimitrijevic, Christian Dotremont, David Douglas Duncan, Don Eddy, Paul Eliasberg, Heinz Emigholz, Ulrich Erben, Walker Evans, Benni Efrat, Ger van Elk, Ed Emshwiller, Hugo Erfurth, Valie Export, Sergej Eisenstein, Peter Henry Emerson, Leo Erb, Garth Evans, Öyvind Fahlström, Federico Fellini, Dan Flavin, Charles Frazier, Lee Friedlander, Herbert Falken, Roger Fenton, Richard Fleischer, Hermine Freed, Hamish Fulton, Ralston Farina, Armand Fernandez, Lucio Fontana, Will Frenken, Heidi Fasnacht, Vincenzo Ferrari, Fred Forest, Achim Freyer, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Robert Filliou, Terry Fox, Gisèle Freund, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Wolfgang Gäfgen, Jochen Gerz, Tina Girouard, Dan Graham, Nancy Graves, Abel Gance, Paul-Armand Gette, Michael Gitlin, Eve Gramatzki, Alan Green, Alexander Gardner, Peter Gidal, Wilhelm von Gloeden, Tom J. Gramse, Marty Greenbaum, Winfred Gaul, Wolfram Giersbach, Jean-Luc Godard, Gotthard Graubner, Alberto Grifi, Rupprecht Geiger, Gilbert & George, Hubertus Gojowczyk, Nancy Graves, Robert Grosvenor, Michael Geissler, Frank Gilette, Kuno Gonschior, Walter Grasskamp, Hetum Gruber, Arnold Genthe, Raimund Girke, Camille Graeser, Gotthard Graubner, Renato Guttuso, Roel D’Haese, Haus-Rucker-Co, Wilhelm Hein, Lewis Hine, Nan Hoover, Helfried Hagenberg, Erich Hauser, Bernhard Heisig, Leon Hirszman, Rebecca Horn, David Hall, Lady Hawarden, Michael Heizer, Antonius Höckelmann, Horst P. Horst, Nigel Hall, Ron Hays, Al Held, David Hockney, George Hoyningen-Huene, Phillipe Halsman, Tim Head, Werner Herzog, Anatol Herzfeld, Alfred Hofkunst, Richard Hamilton, Erwin Heerich, Eva Hesse, Rudolf Hoflehner, Douglas Huebler, Heijo Hangen, Axel Heibel, David Octavius Hill, Edgar Hofschen, Danièle Huillet, Noriyuki Haraguchi, Birgit Hein, John Hilliard, Hans Hollein, Alfonso Hüppi, Karl Horst Hödicke, Shohei Imamura, Will Insley, Jean Ipoustéguy, Patrick Ireland, Hans Paul Isenrath, Ken Jacobs, Paul Jaray, Jasper Johns, Francis Benjamin Johnston, Miklós Jancsó, Jo Jastram, J. Douglas Johnson, Donald Judd, Horst Janssen, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Joan Jonas, Martha Jungwirth, Wolf Kahlen, Buster Keaton, Jürgen Klauke, Beril Korot, Ferdinand Kriwet, Max Kaminski, Ellsworth Kelly, Alexander Kluge, Joseph Kosuth, Germaine Krull, Howard Kanovitz, Michael Kenny, Werner Knaupp, Jannis Kounellis, Shigeko Kubota, Tadeusz Kantor, André Kertész, Günther Knipp, Andras Kovács, Stanley Kubrick, Allan Kaprow, Anselm Kiefer, Milan Knížák, Attila Kovács, Gary Kuehn, Dani Karavan, Harry Kipper, Imi Knoebel, Kurt Kren, Marin Karmitz, Alain Kirili, Alice Kochs, Dieter Krieg, Gertrude Kasebier, Ronald B. Kitaj, Christof Kohlhöfer, Richard Kriesche, On Kawara, Konrad Klapheck, Jiří Kolář, Les Krims, Willem de Kooning, László Lakner, Barry Le Va, Michael Leisgen, Lawrence Lobe, Urs Lüthi, Arthur Lamothe, Russell Lee, Les Levine, Francisco Lopez, Georg Platt Lynes, Richard Landry, Jean Le Gac, Sol LeWitt, Antonio Lopez-Garcia, Nikolaus Lang, Gustave Le Gray, Roy Lichtenstein, Joseph Losey, Dorothea Lange, Malcolm Le Grice, Richard Lindner, Bernhard Luginbühl, John Latham, Barbara Leisgen, Michael Lingner, Bernhard Lüthi, Heinz Mack, Kenneth Martin, Gerhard Merz, Alexander Mitta, Robert Morris, Nino Malfatti, Charles Marville, Mario Merz, Milan Mölzer, Alfons Maria Mucha, Felix H. Man (Hans Baumann), Roberto Matta, Borg Mesch, Bernard Moninot, Ugo Mulas, Robert Mangold, Gordon Matta-Clark, Anette Messager, Henry Moore, Antoni Muntadas, Andy Mann, Wolfgang Mattheuer, Adolphe de Meyer, Stefan Moore, Walter Murch, Werner Mantz, Cynthia Lee Maughan, Duane Michals, Carmengloria Morales, J.-J. Murphy, Piero Manzoni, Antony McCall, Henri Michaux, Marcello Morandini, Zoran Mušič, Giacomo Manzù, Barry McCallion, Rune Mields, Pit Morell, Eadweard Muybridge, Robert Mapplethorpe, Bruce McLean, Antoni Miralda, François Morellet, Brice Marden, Syd Mead, Josef Mikl, Maria Moreno, Agnes Martin, Dariush Mehrjui, Joan Miró, Malcolm Morley, Tomitaro Nachi, Bruce Nauman, Wolfgang Nestler, Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, Maria Nordman, Félix Nadar, Charles Nègre, Richard Newton, Ansgar Nierhoff, Gabriele & Helmut Nothhelfer, Maurizio Nannucci, Werner Nekes, Max Neuhaus, Richard Nonas, Lev V. Nussberg, Dore O., Timothy O’Sullivan, Roman Opalka, Nagisa Oshima, Oswald Oberhuber, Claes Oldenburg, Dennis Oppenheim, Jean Otth, Brian O’Doherty, Claudio Olivieri, Anna Oppermann, Hilmar Pabel, Giulio Paolini, A. R. Penck, Pablo Picasso, Lucio Pozzi, Nam June Paik, Eduardo Paolozzi, Peng-Wan-Ts, Otto Piene, Heinz-Günter Prager, Blinky Palermo, Gordon Parks, Beverly Pepper, Walter Pichler, Mario Prassinos, Magnus Palsson, Sergei Paradschanow, Elio Petri, Anne & Patrick Poirier, Panamarenko, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Wolfgang Petrick, Sigmar Polke, Gina Pane, Max Peintner, Friederike Pezold, Don Potts, Isabel Quintanilla, Daniel Quintero, William Raban, John Reilly, Jacob August Riis, Peter Roehr, Ed Ruscha, David Rabinowitch, James Reineking, Bridget Riley, Ulrike Rosenbach, Ken Russell, Arnulf Rainer, Albert Renger-Patzsch, Klaus Rinke, James Rosenquist, Claude Rutault, Yvonne Rainer, Jean Renoir, Larry Rivers, Francesco Rosi, Reiner Ruthenbeck, Robert Rauschenberg, Alain Resnais, Jacques Rivette, Roberto Rossellini, Robert Ryman, Man Ray, Erich Reusch, Józef Robakowski, Dieter Roth, Éric Rohmer, Tony Ray-Jones, Hans Peter Reuter, Dorothea Rockburne, Arthur Rothstein, Martial Raysse, George Warren Rickey, Alexander Rodtschenko, Gerhard Rühm, Reindeer Werk, Hans Salentin, Tomas Schmit, Eugen Schönebeck, Michael Singer, Edward Steichen, Sohrab Shadid Saless, Wolfgang Schmitz, Martin Schwarz (Künstler), Willi Sitte, Saul Steinberg, Erich Salomon, Helmut Schober, Martin Scorsese, Neal Slavin, Frank Stella, Lucas Samaras, Eugen Schönebeck, George Segal, David Smith, Alfred Stieglitz, Fred Sandback, Ben Schonzeit, Antonio Seguí, Robert Smithson, Sir Benjamin Stone, August Sander, Rudolf Schoofs, Friedrich Seidenstücker, Fernando Ezequiel Solanas, Paul Strand, Sarkis Zabunyan, Jan Schoonhoven, Richard Serra, Michael Snow, Jean-Marie Straub, Antonio Saura, Werner Schroeter, Ben Shahn, Alan Sonfist, Liselotte Strelow, Konrad Balder Schäuffelen, Heinz Schubert, Joel Shapiro, Eve Sonneman, Michell Stuart, Georgij Schengalaja, Alf Schuler, Charles Sheeler, Keith Sonnier, Josef Sudek, Alexander Schleber, HA Schult, Stephen Shore, Daniel Spoerri, István Szábo, Barbara Schmidt-Heins, Bernard Schultze, Katharina Sieverding, Klaus Staeck, Gabriele Schmidt-Heins, Emil Schumacher, Charles Simonds, Ted Stamm, Jiro Takamatsu, Andrej Tarkowskij, George Trakas, Peter Tuma, Vassilakis Takis, André Thomkins, François Truffaut, Deborah Turbeville, William Henry Fox Talbot, Jean Tinguely, Costas Tsoclis, Richard Tuttle, Antoni Tàpies, Gérard Titus-Carmel, Werner Tübke, Cy Twombly,Günther Uecker, Lee U Fan, Timm Ulrichs, Ursula Schultze-Bluhm, Giuliano Vangi, Wladimir Veličkovič, Bill Viola, Klaus Vogelsang, Hannsjörg Voth, Agnès Varda, Bernard Venet, Luchino Visconti, Wolf Vostell, Andrzej Wajda, Weegee, Orson Welles, Gottfried Wiegand, Claus Peter Wittig, Willie Walker, William Wegman, Wim Wenders, Klaus Wildenhahn, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Franz Erhard Walther, Peter Weibel, Lina Wertmüller, Dorothee von Windheim, Erwin Wortelkamp, Andy Warhol, Lawrence Weiner, Dsiga Wertow, Gerd Winner, Fritz Wotruba, Ryszard Wasko, Roger Welch, Marthe Wéry, Reindert Wepko van de Wint, Klaus Wyborny, Wolfgang Weber, Peter Weller, Tom Wesselmann, Rainer Wittenborn, Keigo Yamamoto, Yves Yerson, Yoshio Yoshida, Frank Young, Herbert Zangs, Gianfranco Zappettini, Jerry Zeniuk, Heinrich Zille, Krzysztof Zanussi, Michele Zaza, Christian Ziewer, Zush

Contents: Europe in Soho – Paula COOPER, , ARMAN, Marcel, DUCHAMP, GILBERT & GEORGE, Pier Paolo CALZOLARI, Mario MERZ, Giulio PAOLINI, Alighiero BOETTI, Piero MANZONI, Hans HAACKE, Jannis KOUNELLIS, Giovanni ANSELMO, Ulrich RUCKRIEM, SALVO, Joseph BEUYS, Jan DIBBETS, Hanne DARBOVEN, Laura GRISI, Gerhard RICHTER, Daniel BUREN, Christian BOLTANSKI, Jean LE GAC, Roman OPALKA, Richard LONG, Arthur KOPCKE, Hanne DARBOVEN, Ben VAUTRIER, Rebecca HORN, Robert FILLIOU Fluxus in New York – LA MONTE YOUNG, Gorge MACIUNAS, Takehisa KOSUGI, Benjamin PATTERSON, George BRECHT, Robert WATTS, Takako SAITO, Al HANSEN, Larry MILLERS, NAM JUNE PAIK Street Works Downtown – Scott BURTON, Stephen VARBLE, Adrian PIPER, Richard HAYMAN, Donna HENES, Rosemarie CASTORO, Daniel BUREN, Joan JONAS, Trisha BROWN, Mary MISS, Gordon MATTA-CLARK, Richard SERRA, Vito ACCONCI, Yayoi KUSAMA SOHO DU MAL. Film, Video, Culture, Politics – Dennis OPPENHEIM, Dan GRAHAM, Roger CUTFORTH, Peter CAMPUS, Michael SNOW, Douglas DAVIS, Shigeko KUBOTA, Joseph BEUYS, NAM JUNE PAIK, John CAGE, Jaime DAVIDOVICH, Mary LUCIER, Liza BEAR Music, Tanz, Performance – Mabou MINES, Richard FOREMAN, Merce CUNNINGHAM, GRAND UNION, David TUDOR, John CAGE, Robert ASHLEY, Gordon MUMMA, Alvin LUCIER, Jim BURTON, David BEHRMAN, Steve REICH, Philip GLASS, Meredith MONK, Viola FARBER, Lucinda CHILDS, Joan LA BARBARA, Robert WATTS, Simone FORTI, Charlemagne PALESTINE, Giuseppe CHIARI, Laurie ANDERSON,

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