Ari Marcopoulos is an inveterate maker of zines. This project collects in one volume for the first time a selection of zines by Marcopoulos, many never before released, providing a unique insight and overview into an essential part of this influential artist’s daily practice. Often self-published or created in collaboration with boutique and independent publishers like ROMA, Dashwood Books, and PPP Editions, these informal, DIY-aesthetic creations function as sketchbook, diary, installation space, and a means of processing Marcopoulos’s daily practice of photographing his life, his family, his neighborhood, and the rarified cultural milieu in which he operates. This collection showcases an impressive array of printed zines, exploring each as an artistic object through an engaging layout. Beginning in 2015 and presented chronologically per year, key zines are featured—including some made during the pandemic, when Marcopoulos worked primarily on the screen, making PDF zines—and punctuated by individual images presented full scale. An interview with Hamza Walker underscores the role of zines as an essential part of Marcopoulos’s artistic practice, emphasizing the personal, diaristic element within the work, while an essay from Maggie Nelson meditates on the work’s position within a wider social and cultural context. Ari Marcopoulos: Zines is a must-have for anyone interested in this prolific artist’s personal practice and zine culture.

Ari Marcopoulos was born in Amsterdam in 1957 and moved to New York in 1980, at the height of the citys art scene. An artist, filmmaker, and photographer, his body of work includes portraits, street scenes, and landscapes from places as diverse as Tokyo, Lebanon, New Orleans, Brooklyn, and the California coast. His subjects have been musicians, celebrities, artists, and friends, as well as the anonymous denizens of the boroughs he has wandered. His images are saturated with movement and transformation, with outsiders, the underground, and the periphery, with discontinuities and amnesia.

Inspired by ‘Tokyo Papers’ by Karel Martens, Ari Marcopoulos arranged his pictures while thinking about what would distinguish inside and outside, public and private. It is an idea that had already become a prevalent thought during the Covid-19 pandemic. The images in colour, hidden on the inside folds of the pages of this publication, are mostly portraits of objects and people, while the black-and-white photographs on the visible pages are recent work of primarily exterior shots taken in January and February of 2021. Envisioning his own photos in book form is “a good way to see how images look together”, according to Marcopoulos. “I even think of the book as a form of a short film”.

This artist’s book accompanies Ari Marcopoulos’s exhibition at Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen. To create the book, Marcopoulos re-photographed prints of his photographs that he had produced at home using a pigment printer. This process was in many ways a continuation of the period of pandemic isolation in which most of the images were photographed. Closely aligned with his own copious output, the selection is both haphazard and intuitive, leaving room for spontaneity and even mistakes. A portion of the book also focuses on the 2021 video installation ‘Alone Together’, featuring a saxophone performance by jazz legend Joe McPhee, which forms a central part of the exhibition.

Between 2014 and 2019, Ari Marcopoulos documented the Conrad McRae Youth League Tournament at Dean Street Playground in Brooklyn, New York. Players from age six and older can participate in the tournament, which features some of the best high school basketball players from the greater New York City area. His individual and group portraits of the players, staff, and audience are interspersed with action-filled shots of the games, while the tournament jersey with its small “Jumpman” logo (inspired by Michael Jordan) becomes the series’ predominant theme. In both posed and candid shots we see players poised, ready to hit the court, or sweating in the summer heat.

Air travel has informed Ari Marcopoulos’ life more than most. Beyond a necessary mode of transport, the passenger plane has proved something of quiet point of obsession for the Amsterdam-born, New York-based photographer and filmmaker. Before moving to New York in 1980 – where Marcopoulos would carve out a career defined by his raw and intimate renderings of some of America’s most significant subcultural protagonists – he spent much of his childhood flying with his father, a commercial airline pilot. A conversation with Marcopoulos reveals a fascination that still burns. He recalls wandering the tarmac, studying the underside of the wings and fuselage; he remembers riding in the cockpit on an overbooked flight en-route to a Euro Cup final; he flaunts an almost encyclopaedic knowledge of new, old and mothballed commercial airplanes – the Lockheed Super Constellation, Douglas DC-8 Stretch and the Boeing 737-MAX among them. Boarding Pass, Marcopoulos’ new book for Nieves and Perimeter Editions, takes this experience of flight, and the machines that make it possible, as its defining motifs. Photographed over the last year while in transit, the characteristically intuitive, off-the-cuff images that populate this volume offer countless vantages – near and far – of airplanes on the tarmac or in flight, rerouting our gaze from the pragmatic and economic towards the poetic. Here, Marcopoulos appeals to the notion that flying – for all its supposed monotony – is still something close to a miracle.

Ari Marcopoulos is an Amsterdam-born photographer and filmmaker who often situates himself in the lives of people living on the edge. He shot this series during one February afternoon in Exarcheia, a neighbourhood in central Athens which is famously known as home to Greek anarchists. Through 352 colourful pictures of graffiti and crumbling concrete walls, a coherent urban portrait comes to light, as if Marcopoulos was scanning the area through his camera lens. The entire series remains unedited in the layout of the book, presenting an accurate reflection of a district that still preserves the memory of decades of resistance to state repression.

Influential to both art and fashion, Ari Marcopoulos’s unique style of raw immediacy has made him one of the most important contemporary photographers. For thirty years, photographer Ari Marcopoulos has been pioneering contemporary photography by documenting subcultures such as skateboarders and graffiti artists, as well as landscapes and his own family and friends. Since his days printing photographs for Andy Warhol, he has amassed a huge body of work marked by its arresting and unsentimental intimacy that has been influential to the worlds of art, fashion, and photography.Bound to mimic a phone book, Ari Marcopoulos: Directory presents a collection of approximately 1,200 photographs, with curator and critic Neville Wakefield providing insightful commentary on some of Marcopoulos’s singular images. Copublished with Nieves, each book in this limited-edition series includes a print signed by the artist.

Photographer Ari Marcopoulos’ newest publication takes an in-depth look into the studio process of American artist and filmmaker Matthew Barney. Shot over four years, ‘Fumes’ depicts the activity within Barney’s Long Island City studio from 2011 to 2014. Marcopoulos documented the day-to-day activity in the workspace, from the digging of an Egyptian death chamber to the flooding during Hurricane Irene, to the ongoing preparation for Barney’s 2014 film epic ‘River of Fundament’: “I got sucked into taking photographs of the people working on the various projects, more and more it felt almost like a performance.” The publication is comprised of black-and-white and full-color spreads showing workers transporting, molding and fusing toxic materials, interwoven with an array of intricate pictorial montages, mirroring those of a negative. Marcopoulos captures the human figure at work, in motion, pursuing life in its most ordinary moments in order to create something extraordinary.

Whether photographing his wife and two young sons, sometimes sleeping tenderly together in a sun-drenched bed, other times spacing out by the pool or in the car; the international snowboarding scene, from Japan to Iran; or his peers in the world of dissenting, outsider creativity (filmmaker Harmony Korine and his grandmother, well before the release of Kids; the late monologist, Spalding Gray, who died of suicidal drowning in 2004, eerily photographed floating underwater in 1987), Ari Marcopoulos brings us all the way to the inside of an insider’s world. This tight collection of sexy documentary portraits bites off exactly as much as it wants to chew, and features original writing by Will Bradley, Jeremy Sigler and Angelique Spaninks.

Born in Amsterdam in 1957, Ari Marcopoulos came to New York in 1979 and quickly became part of a downtown art scene that included Jean-Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring and Robert Mapplethorpe. Since then, Marcopoulos has become recognized as a leading documentarian of contemporary culture, having chronicled the emerging hip hop scene, shot snowboarders in action and revealed the vicissitudes of his family life. Marcopoulos always appears to have forged a strong connection with the people he photographs, whether celebrated figures-from Andy Warhol to Kiki Smith, John Cage to LL Cool J-or more obscure personalities, so that he captures, without sentimentality or voyeurism, the intimate sensation of their daily lives. His images are particular to a time and place, but reach out to us via familiar themes such as family and the longing for adventure. The first retrospective on Marcopoulos, Within Arm’s Reachcollects work from three decades, and is supplemented with an essay by Stephanie Cannizzo.

Photographs taken by Ari Marcopoulos in Rome (February – March 2016), and Malibu (August 2016). With a text contribution by Kara Walker. “”Rome. (…) Here, no image or structure is complete without symbolic framing devices, which also require framing devices, and so on. Ad infinitum. Malibu. Rockstars and fallen rocks and the edge, here is where the European conquest of the New World meets its fountain of youth endgame. We have reached the end, and it is vast.

Kara Walker’s work astutely examines race, gender, and identity. Walker’s newest series of large-scale drawings stem from her consideration of monuments and notions of permanence and impermanence following her massive public art project, A Subtlety, in Brooklyn. Influenced in part by the artist’s recent residency at the American Academy in Rome, this series of drawings is an extensive examination of how Walker envisions the rise and fall of society. Richly illustrated, this publication includes plates of each drawing, as well as intimate photographs of the artist at work taken by her partner, acclaimed artist and filmmaker Ari Marcopoulos. An introduction by Reto Thüring and Beau Rutland contextualizes the importance of this latest evolution within Walker’s oeuvre; John Lansdowne addresses the topic of Christian iconography and its relationship to Walker’s new drawings; and Pulitzer Prize–winning poet Tracy K. Smith contributes a new poem. In addition, a text by Walker considers her work within the recent political climate.

On the occasion of an exhibition in Paris on the JRP/Ringier publishing program, Ari Marcopoulos edited this commemorative zine Contributions from artists and writers who have worked with JRP/ Ringer in the past were limited only by the page size (8″ x 10″ pages and spreads). While lacking an official theme, the structurally and figuratively playful layouts reflect the certain je ne sais quoi embodied by the forwardthinking publishing house. With contributions by Allen Ruppersberg, Richard Prince, Olaf Breuning, Liam Gillick, Jim Shaw, AA Bronson and Guyton /Walker, among many others.

Kara Walker’s (born 1969) Figa, a sculpture monumental in both size and symbol, was installed at the DESTE Foundation’s Hydra Slaughterhouse in 2017. Once a part of Walker’s colossal 2014 installation A Subtlety at the Domino Sugar Refinery in Brooklyn, Figa is made up of the hand piece from the anamorphic sphinx that gestures a “fig sign,” at once both a symbol of fertility and a “fuck you.” In making a return to the site of the Sugar Factory work and the work’s progeny in Hydra, this book offers critical insight on A Subtlety and Figa. Through extensive photographic documentation of the installation of the hand sculpture in Hydra by Ari Marcopoulos and seven fables written by Walker illustrating the power of folklore, mythology and black identity across the history of the United States, Figa in book form captures a blockbuster exhibition in two parts.

This book contains four different views of an artists’ books collection. We just sorted in chronological order and took a picture of what was inside. Vincenzo Agnetti, Carl Andre, Nobuyoshi Araki, Stefano Arienti, Enrico Baj, John Baldessari, Fiona Banner, Matthew Barney, Robert Barry, Carlo Bertè, Alighiero Boetti, Christian Boltanski, Agostino Bonalumi, Brad Brace, Stanley Brouwn, James Lee Byars, Vincenzo Cabiati, Antonio Calderara, Enrico Castellani, Mariana Castillo Deball, Eduardo Chillida, Jean Cocteau, Gianni Colombo, Pietro Consagra, Gino De Dominicis, Sonia Delaunay, Herman De Vries, Giulia Di Lenarda, Gillo Dorfles, Peter Downsbrough, Marcel Duchamp, Olafur Eliasson, Peter Fischli & David Weiss, Lucio Fontana, Tom Friedman, Natalia Gončarova, Douglas Gordon, Roni Horn, Emilio Isgrò, Alex Katz, Anselm Kiefer, Terence Koh, Jannis Kounellis, Melissa Kretschmer, Frank Kupka, Maria Lai, Sol LeWitt, Ugo Locatelli, Claudia Losi, Françoise Mairey, Man Ray, Ari Marcopoulos, Brice Marden, Amedeo Martegani, Fausto Melotti, Jonathan Monk, Mariko Mori, Bruno Munari, Mario Nigro, Mimmo Paladino, Luca Pancrazzi, Giulio Paolini, Jes Petersen, Pablo Picasso, Sigmar Polke, Arnaldo Pomodoro, Markus Raetz, Angelo Savelli, Salvatore Scarpitta, Jim Shaw, Roman Signer, Kiki Smith, Dash Snow, Ettore Spalletti, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Wolfgang Tillmans, Richard Tuttle, Erik Van Der Weijde, Bram Van Velde, Luigi Veronesi, Jan Voss, Andy Warhol, Christopher Wool, Erwin Wurm, Yasuhiro Yoshioka

Since its inauguration in 1932, the Whitney Biennial has showcased contemporary artistic innovation, becoming a highly anticipated event in the art world. The 2010 Biennial is curated by Francesco Bonami and Gary Carrion-Murayari and features works by approximately 55 artists working in a variety of media and practices. Uniquely, this catalogue serves as both a handsome accompaniment to the 2010 exhibition and an insightful exploration of the significance of this acclaimed and often controversial event throughout its history. In addition to presenting full-color reproductions of the selected artists’ recent work, the curators have prepared a joint essay on the 2010 exhibition, and a group of writers contributed brief entries on the represented artists’ techniques, influences, and recent work. A detailed appendix features a short text on the significance of the museum’s annual and biennial exhibitions in the context of the museum’s history and broader collection, as well as photographs of previous installations, facsimiles of historical reviews, and a chronological list of artists included in past annuals and biennials. Thumbnails of all previous catalogue covers are also included, positioning each Biennial as a snapshot of artistic practice at a particular moment. Participating artists: David Adamo Richard Aldrich Michael Asher Tauba Auerbach Nina Berman Huma Bhabha Josh Brand The Bruce High Quality Foundation James Casebere Edgar Cleijne and Ellen Gallagher Dawn Clements George Condo Sarah Crowner Verne Dawson Julia Fish Roland Flexner Suzan Frecon Maureen Gallace Theaster Gates Kate Gilmore Hannah Greely Jesse Aron Green Robert Grosvenor Sharon Hayes Thomas Houseago Alex Hubbard Jessica Jackson Hutchins Jeffrey Inaba Martin Kersels Jim Lutes Babette Mangolte Curtis Mann Ari Marcopoulos Daniel McDonald Josephine Meckseper Rashaad Newsome Kelly Nipper Lorraine O’Grady R.H. Quaytman Charles Ray Emily Roysdon Aki Sasamoto Aurel Schmidt Scott Short Stephanie Sinclair Ania Soliman Storm Tharp Tam Tran Kerry Tribe Piotr Uklanski Lesley Vance Marianne Vitale Erika Vogt Pae White Robert Williams

Ari Marcopoulos is best known for documenting boyish subcultures from the inside out. His work on professional snowboarding appears in Transitions and Exits and his photos on hip-hop–five years of images of the Beastie Boys–in Pass the Mic. Aaron Rose, who showed Marcopoulos at Alleged Gallery, has said of the artist’s uncanny connection with one set of subjects, a crowd of New York skateboarders ten years his junior, “There was just something in his personality that said, ‘Hey man, it’s cool.'” It shows. Marcopoulos’s self-taught snapshot style brings his subjects in close, and captures, without sentimentality or voyeurism, the intimate feeling of their daily life. Here he focuses on the subculture that is his own family. Even the President of the United States Sometimes Has Got to Stand Naked is a journal-like collection of images of the accidents and pleasures of “normal” life, full of the artist’s loved ones, of landscapes and of American social reality.

From 1982’s Pollywog Stew to 1998’s Hello Nasty and 2004’s To The 5 Boroughs, Beastie Boys have pushed, bent, and molded the boundaries of music and pop culture worldwide. Starting out as a punk band from New York City, they mutated into the first Hip Hop act to hit number one on the pop charts, and went back to live instrumentation, while always drawing on a wide array of musical sources—from funk to hardcore, from Hip Hop to afro-cuban jazz.

Compiled by the band, Beastie Boys Anthology: The Sounds of Science takes you through the lives of MCA, Ad-Rock, and Mike D as they chronicle the creation of “Fight for Your Right”, “Shake Your Rump”, “Hey Ladies”, “Pass the Mic”, “Jimmy James”, “So What’cha Want”, “Sure Shot”, “Sabotage”, “Intergalactic”, “Body Movin’” and more—all in their own words. The anthology also includes two CDs packed with their greatest hits and B-sides, making this the ultimate Beastie Boys collector’s item.

With photographs taken by Spike Jonze, Ari Marcopoulos, Ricky Powell, Glen E. Friedman, Danny Clinch, Nathanial Hörnblowér, and Sean Mortenson, to name a few, Beastie Boys Anthology provides the most insightful look to date into the trio that has defined cutting edge hip hop and alternative music and culture for more than two decades.

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