An essential reference that provides new understanding of the thought processes of one of the most radical artists of the late twentieth century. Gordon Matta-Clark (1943–1978) has never been an easy artist to categorize or to explain. Although trained as an architect, he has been described as a sculptor, a photographer, an organizer of performances, and a writer of manifestos, but he is best known for un-building abandoned structures. In the brief span of his career, from 1968 to his early death in 1978, he created an oeuvre that has made him an enduring cult figure.   In 2002, when Gordon Matta-Clark’s widow, Jane Crawford, put his archive on deposit at the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montreal, it revealed a new voice in the ongoing discussion of artist/architect Matta-Clark’s work: his own. Gwendolyn Owens and Philip Ursprung’s careful selection and ordering of letters, interviews, statements, and the now-famous art cards from the CCA as well as other sources deepens our understanding of one of the most original thinkers of his generation. Gordon Matta-Clark: An Archival Sourcebook creates a multidimensional portrait that provides an opportunity for readers to explore and enjoy the complexity and contradiction that was Gordon Matta-Clark.

Este libro recoge seis entrevistas realizadas al artista estadounidense Gordon Matta-Clark (1943-1978) en los años más productivos de su trayectoria artística, desde 1974, poco después de completar su famosa obra Splitting —que consistió en partir por la mitad una casa suburbana condenada al derribo—, hasta el año de su temprana muerte, en 1978, a los 35 años de edad. Artista de pocas palabras, que prefería la acción a las declaraciones teóricas, estas entrevistas constituyen unos valiosos documentos para profundizar en las motivaciones que dieron lugar a sus obras.

A new publication spotlights Gordon Matta-Clark’s only extant architectural piece

In 1972, Gordon Matta-Clark (1943–78) installed a dumpster on the street between 98 and 112 Greene Street in New York’s SoHo neighborhood, an architectural artwork he called Open House. Matta-Clark used discarded, scavenged materials old pieces of wood, doors to subdivide the space inside the dumpster, creating corridors and small rooms within the container. Dancers and artists moved around the space, their pedestrian movements activating the sculpture and captured in a Super-8 film of the piece.

Matta-Clark is best known for his building cuts and architectural interventions. Because of the nature of this work and its context sited in spaces abandoned or slated for demolition Matta-Clark’s “anarchitecture” was almost necessarily ephemeral, surviving as only documentation and sculptural sections. Open House (1972) is the only still-extant architectural piece by Matta-Clark.

Gordon Matta-Clark: Open House is the first publication to focus on this crucial piece by the artist, using it as a way into his complex body of work. Featuring contributions from Sophie Costes, Thierry Davila and Lydia Yee, this volume takes a historical and theoretical approach to Open House and Matta-Clark’s entire oeuvre.

Gordon Matta-Clark was born in New York City, New York, on 22 June 1943 and died in Nyack, New York, on 27 August 1978. He was the second of twin sons born to two Surrealist artists, Chilean Roberto Matta-Echaurren (ca. 1912-2002) and American Anna Louise Clark (1914-1997). He entered the architecture program at Cornell University in 1962 but left in 1963 and spent the following year in Paris living with his father and studying French. He returned to Cornell in 1964 and by the time of his graduation in spring 1968 he was among the outstanding students. In mid-1969, Matta-Clark moved to New York City and his early projects involved transformations: such as Photo-Fry (1969), Agar (1969-1970), Garbage Wall (1970), and Time Well (1971). He began executing building interventions in 1971 when he cut walls in a loft in New York City to create Sauna (1971) and at the Museo de Bellas Artes in Santiago where he made an untitled wall cutting (1971). Throughout the following years of his major building cuts, Matta-Clark continued to explore other aspects of cities and their structures. Matta-Clark married Jane Crawford in 1978 but soon passed away from cancer, two months after his 35th birthday.

Bringing a poet’s perspective to an artist’s archive, this highly original book examines wordplay in the art and thought of American artist Gordon Matta-Clark (1943–1978). A pivotal figure in the postminimalist generation who was also the son of a prominent Surrealist, Matta-Clark was a leader in the downtown artists’ community in New York in the 1970s, and is widely seen as a pioneer of what has come to be known as social practice art. He is celebrated for his “anarchitectural” environments and performances, and the films, photographs, drawings, and sculptural fragments with which his site-specific work was documented. In studies of his career, the artist’s provocative and vivid language is referenced constantly. Yet the verbal aspect of his practice has not previously been examined in its own right. Blending close readings of Matta-Clark’s visual and verbal creations with reception history and critical biography, this extensively researched study engages with the linguistic and semiotic forms in Matta-Clark’s art, forms that activate what he called the “poetics of psycho-locus” and “total (semiotic) system.” Examining notes, statements, titles, letters, and interviews in light of what they reveal about his work at large, Frances Richard unearths archival, biographical, and historical information, linking Matta-Clark to Conceptualist peers and Surrealist and Dada forebears. Gordon Matta-Clark: Physical Poetics explores the paradoxical durability of Matta-Clark’s language, and its role in an aggressively physical oeuvre whose major works have been destroyed.

MoMA PS1 presents the fourth iteration of Greater New York. Recurring every five years, the exhibition has traditionally showcased the work of emerging artists living and working in the New York metropolitan area. Considering the “greater” aspect of its title in terms of both geography and time, Greater New York. begins roughly with the moment when MoMA PS1 was founded in 1976 as an alternative venue that took advantage of disused real estate, reaching back to artists who engaged the margins of the city.
In conjunction with the exhibition, MoMA PS1 is publishing a series of readers that will be released throughout the run of the exhibition. These short volumes revisit older histories of New York while also inviting speculation about its future, highlighting certain works in the exhibition and engaging a range of subjects including disco, performance anxiety, real estate and newly unearthed historical documents. The series features contributions from Fia Backstrüm, Mark Beasley, Gregg Bordowitz, Susan Cianciolo, Douglas Crimp, Catherine Damman, David Grubbs, Angie Keefer, Aidan Koch, Glenn Ligon, Gordon Matta-Clark, Claudia Rankine, Collier Schorr, and Sukhdev Sandhu, concluding with a round-table conversation with exhibition curators Peter Eleey, Douglas Crimp, Thomas J. Lax and Mia Locks. The series is edited by Jocelyn Miller, Curatorial Associate, MoMA PS1.

Qualifying the ancient Greek saying “Man is the measure,” Gordon Matta-Clark (1943–1978) asserted instead “You are the measure,” conveying the defining theme in an oeuvre that would exert a powerful influence on fellow artists and architects. In artworks that combined minimalist, conceptual, and performative practices, Matta-Clark gave primary importance to the individual and considerations of everyday life. This comprehensive book incorporates important new information from the Matta-Clark archive, presenting a compelling reappraisal of the unique beauty and radical nature of Matta-Clark’s punnings, plans, performances, and interventions evident in the many media in which he worked: sculptural objects (most notably from building cuts), drawings, films, photographs, and documentary material.
The son of Chilean Surrealist painter Roberto Matta and godson of Marcel Duchamp, Matta-Clark trained as an architect. He is renowned for his poignant use of urban landscapes, creating many site-specific works (often outside of a museum or gallery context) in New York and abroad. In this handsome book, distinguished scholars of contemporary art provide new insights into Matta-Clark’s work: the reception of his art during his lifetime; the impact of his socially engaged lifestyle; the production of his films; his photography, in particular his collages that have not been thoroughly explored; the creation and conservation of his building cut Splitting; and much more.

With his astounding building cuts and intersects, Gordon Matta-Clark (1943-1978) opened up elegant geometries in the very structures that seem most substantial and most authoritative in urban existence, revealing the alienations of the urban fabric as convenient fictions and allowing life to flow into the most inhospitable and self-contained of buildings. One of his favorite responses to a work came from a Parisian concierge: “I see the purpose for that hole–it is an experiment in bringing light and air into spaces that never had enough of either.” Throughout his all-too-brief career, Matta-Clark undertook civic aeration on many fronts, cofounding the now legendary Food Restaurant in 1971, buying up empty lots in Queens and evolving his theory of “anarchitecture” in films, photomontages and numerous writings and drawings. Anarchitecture redefined negative space in art as a political act, distinguishing itself from architecture by imagining a cure for its most pernicious effects. Gordon Matta-Clark: Moment to Moment offers a comprehensive overview of this courageous and liberating artist with a wealth of documentation and reproductions from across Matta-Clark’s oeuvre, as well as critical commentary from Philip Ursprung, Angela Lammert, Hubertus von Amelunxen, Dan Graham and others.

By un-doing a building there are many aspects of the social condition against which I am gesturing: to open a state of enclosure which had been preconditioned not only by physical necessity but by the industry that profligates suburban and urban boxes as a context for insuring a passive, isolated consumer – a virtually captive audience. Gordon Matta-Clark, 1977 Éditions Lutanie presents a collection of six interviews with Gordon Matta-Clark, most of them now translated into French for the first time.

Gordon Matta-Clarkís Conical Intersect (1975) was a torqued, spiraling ìcutî into two derelict seventeenth-century Paris buildings adjacent to the construction site of the controversial Centre Pompidou. With this landmark work of ìanarchtecture,î Matta-Clark not only opened up these venerable residences to light and air, he also began a dialogue about the nature of urban development and the public role of art. Considered three and a half decades later, Conical Intersect reveals the multivalent nature of the artistís practice and his prescient focus on sustainability and creative reuse of the built environment.

Conical Intersect and the two buildings were demolished as part of a large-scale urban renovation of the historic market district of Les Halles; today we can know the work only from drawings, photographs, and a short Super 8 film. In this illustrated study, Bruce Jenkins examines Matta-Clarkís ìnon-u-ment,î looking closely at the artistís proposals, working process, various forms of documentation, and the dialogue begun by Matta-Clarkís decision to transform two abandoned buildings ìinto an act of communication.î

This exciting volume presents the work of three leading figures of the New York art scene of the 1970s, focusing on the intersections between their practices and exploring their shared concerns. Collaborators and friends, Laurie Anderson, Trisha Brown and Gordon Matta-Clark were at the cutting edge of Manhattan’s burgeoning downtown art scene during the 1970s. This catalogue accompanies an exhibition at Barbican Art Gallery in London, which examines the crossover of these artists’ practices and the influence of their work on each other. Focusing on their mutual themes of performance, the body, the urban environment and found spaces, the book is divided into four sections: Downtown New York; Drawing and Performing; Urban Inventions; and Performance and Interaction. The city of New York in the 1970s, faced with bankruptcy, rising crime rates and unemployment, plays its own starring role in the book, as these artists worked in derelict city buildings for their large-scale projects and engaged directly with the public out of doors. A fascinating portrait of three ground-breaking artists, this beautiful volume documents an exciting period in the history of contemporary art, and reveals the lasting value of open exchange between artists and genres.

Exhibition catalogue based upon artists’ book by Matta-Clark, produced in conjunction with exhibition held November 20 – December 15, 1990. Contains introduction by Mary Jane Jacob and acknowledgment by Holly Solomon, checklist and images of “Splitting” works with incorporated fold-out.

Known for–and even overshadowed by–his brutal and spectacular building cuts, Gordon Matta-Clark’s oeuvre is unique in the history of American art. He worked in the 1970s on the borders between art and architecture and his diverse practice is often understood as an outright rejection of the tenets of high modernism. Stephen Walker argues instead for the artist’s ambivalent relationship with the architectural heritage he is often claimed to disavow, thus making this the first book to extrapolate Matta-Clark’s thinking beyond its immediate context. Walker considers the broad range of Matta-Clark’s ephemeral practice, from montage to actual interventions and from performance art and installation to drawing, film and video. Bringing to the fore the consistent themes and issues explored through this broad range of media, and in particular the complex notion of the “discreet violation,” he reveals the continued relevance of Matta-Clark’s artistic and theoretical oeuvre to the reception of artistic and architectural work today.

This lavishly illustrated publication from The Institute Of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia offers a comprehensive overview of the unique creative output of the American artist Gordon Matta-Clark (1943-1978). The catalog offers a beginning of scholarly analysis on the influencial artworks and discusses the critical impact of Matta-Clark’s career path within the Minimalist and Conceptual art historical context.

Gordon Matta-Clark, scion and rebel, died at 35 in 1978 and has since become a cult figure of late-twentieth-century art. Born in New York and trained in architecture at Cornell, he went on to question the field’s conventions in vivid projects that excised holes into existing buildings or assembled deeds to New York City alleys and curbs. As the son of the Chilean-born Surrealist painter Roberto Matta and Anne Clark, and godson of Marcel Duchamp, with whom he played a regular game of chess in the Village, Matta-Clark had grown up inside the art world, also working an as assistant to mavericks like Dennis Oppenheim and Robert Smithson. His work and words, while sophisticated enough to make him an “artist’s artist,” and colossal and outgoing enough to draw public attention and affection, were always also grounded in social or political convictions. He addressed not only space and real estate (in other words, housing), but the ultimate in necessity and nourishment, food. His “Pig Roast” under the Brooklyn Bridge offered passersby 500 pork sandwiches, and Food, the artist-staffed restaurant that he opened with dancer Caroline Goodden in SoHo, became a headquarters for that nascent neighborhood in the early 70s. He consistently broke the boundaries between sculpture and architecture, photography and film, performance and installation, and above all the permanent and the transitory. Once in a while he also broke the law. This book, published in celebration of the gradual opening of Matta-Clark’s archives at the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montreal, collects previously unavailable writings, including notecards and notebooks, along with interviews and more than 100 illustrations.

Although highly regarded during his short life–and honored by artists and architects today–the American artist Gordon Matta-Clark (1943-78) has been largely ignored within the history of art. Matta-Clark is best remembered for site-specific projects known as “building cuts.” Sculptural transformations of architecture produced through direct cuts into buildings scheduled for demolition, these works now exist only as sculptural fragments, photographs, and film and video documentations. Matta-Clark is also remembered as a catalytic force in the creation of SoHo in the early 1970s. Through loft activities, site projects at the exhibition space 112 Greene Street, and his work at the restaurant Food, he participated in the production of a new social and artistic space. Have art historians written so little about Matta-Clark’s work because of its ephemerality, or, as Pamela M. Lee argues, because of its historiographic, political, and social dimensions? What did the activity of carving up a building-in anticipation of its destruction–suggest about the conditions of art making, architecture, and urbanism in the 1970s? What was one to make of the paradox attendant on its making–that the production of the object was contingent upon its ruination? How do these projects address the very writing of history, a history that imagines itself building toward an ideal work in the service of progress? In this first critical account of Matta-Clark’s work, Lee considers it in the context of the art of the 1970s–particularly site-specific, conceptual, and minimalist practices–and its confrontation with issues of community, property, the alienation of urban space, the “right to the city,” and the ideologies of progress that have defined modern building programs.

In honor of “Food”, the restaurant which Gordon Matta-Clark established in Soho, New York, this publication is presented in the form of a restaurant menu, and documents the artist’s varied and imaginative work, including sculptures, film stills, and photos.

Well known for his radical “anarchitectural” interventions throughout the 1970s, Gordon Matta-Clark (1943–78) was always deeply, though less publicly, committed to drawing. His works on paper―which span three-dimensional reliefs, calligraphy and notebook entries―capture the interdisciplinary spirit that defined the art world in the 1970s, testifying to his interest in the crossovers between visual and performance arts. Gordon Matta-Clark: The Beginning of Trees and the End, published on the occasion of the eponymous 2015 show at David Zwirner, New York, documents his extraordinary accomplishment as a draftsman. Organized by theme, the catalogue presents selections from Matta-Clark’s Cut Drawings, Energy Rooms, Energy Trees and his own “calligraphy,” many of which have never been published. Perhaps the best known of the group, the Cut Drawings explore smaller-format versions of his architectural interventions; slicing meticulously through several layers of paper, gesso or cardboard, Matta-Clark created flat sculptural works that emphasized the voids created by extracting matter. Drawings with Matta-Clark’s own “calligraphy” emphasize the medium of drawing as an independent form. Some of the most elaborate and colorful compositions include trees, several of which refer to Matta-Clark’s Tree Dance performance at Vassar College in 1971. Near-abstract tree shapes also incorporate his calligraphic marks, with branches constructed from imaginary letters. Matta-Clark’s Notebooks, which combine elements of Surrealist automatic drawing with an interest in choreography, appealed to performance artists, including Laurie Anderson and Trisha Brown. This unparalleled presentation of Matta-Clark’s drawings is accompanied by new scholarship by Briony Fer, as well as an interview with artist Sarah Sze by Jessamyn Fiore, co-director of the Estate of Gordon Matta-Clark.

Gordon Matta-Clark (1943–78) died at only 35 of pancreatic cancer and has since become a cult figure of late 20th-century art. Trained in architecture at Cornell, he went on to question the field’s conventions in vivid projects―performance and recycling pieces, space and texture works and word games―some of which excised holes into existing buildings or assembled deeds to New York City alleys and curbs. The artist used a variety of media to document his work, including film, video and photography. His work and words, while sophisticated enough to make him an “artist’s artist,” and colossal and outgoing enough to draw public attention and affection, were always also grounded in social or political convictions. In the early 1970s, Matta-Clark developed the idea of “anarchitecture,” which encompassed his interest in voids, gaps and left-over spaces. Gordon Matta-Clark: Experience Becomes the Object collects five essays and ten individual interviews with various friends and family members of Matta-Clark’s. Together, they outline a biographical profile and offer an analysis of the historical period in which the artist developed his short but successful career. New, never-before-published material and photographs as well as an exclusive link to the documentary Crosswords: Matta-Clark’s Friends by Matias Cardone are also included.

Catalogue of the exhibition at Badischer Kunstverein in Karlsruhe from 13th March to 29th April 1979.

From 1970 to 1978, Gordon Matta-Clark (1943-1978) was in the habit of jotting down notes on index cards that he carried with him throughout his travels, from Lower Manhattan to Santiago de Chile, from Ithaca to Paris and New Jersey. This book compiles these “art cards.” Combining writing and drawing, Matta-Clark’s statements–some only a few words long, others a paragraph–are both manifestos and meditations on his life (“the pockets that carry you through the day”), his craft (“Proposal to a Wall St stock broker: to cut through a tax shelter”) and the built environment (“To the nature of materials Anarchitecture adds a notion of events”). Ranging in tone from the melancholic to the cheerful, these art cards are saturated throughout with the excitement of living as an artist in 1970s New York City.

Contents: Interview with Gordon Matta-Clark Al Brunelle: The Great Divide: ‘Anarchitecture’ by Gordon Matta-Clark in Art in America September 1974 Donald Wall: Gordon Matta-Clark’s Building Dissections in Artsmagazine March 1976 Drawings and Photos Biography and Bibliography Text: Matta-Clark Gordon, Bex Florent, Matta-Clark Gordon, Brunelle Al, Wall Donald in Dutch and English cm 21×30; pp. 49; BW ills.; staple binding. Contents: Interview with Gordon Matta-Clark / Al Brunelle: The Great Divide: ‘Anarchitecture’ by Gordon Matta-Clark in Art in America September 1974 / Donald Wall: Gordon Matta-Clark’s Building Dissections in Artsmagazine March 1976 / Drawings and Photos / Biography and Bibliography. A rare document of the Gordon Matta-Clark exhibition at ICC Internationaal Cultureel Centrum, Antwerpen [8 oktober – 6 november 1977]

Il volume accompagna il più grande evento espositivo mai dedicato in Italia all’‘anarchitetto’ Gordon Matta-Clark (New York, 1943-1978), attraverso il quale si ricostruisce la parabola della sua variegata e feconda carriera che, a partire dalla fine degli anni sessanta fino alla prematura scomparsa, ha spaziato fra i linguaggi e i mezzi espressivi più diversi. Sin dai primi esperimenti Matta Clark impronta la propria attività ai criteri della destrutturazione, della rottura, dello spostamento fisico e semantico di elementi architettonici, creando forme innovative di convivenza tra l’uomo e il reale. I primi a essere documentati – come Garbage Wall (1970) – sono gli interventi che, intrapresi nei cosiddetti ‘non luoghi’, come cortili derelitti, discariche o zone malfamate in totale abbandono, segnano l’avvento della coscienza e della consapevolezza ecologica nell’arte e che, intersecandosi con la Land Art, aprono la strada all’indagine successiva, incentrata sui cambiamenti nel tessuto urbano e architettonico. Presenti anche alcune opere in cui è la materia stessa a essere trasformata grazie all’intervento dell’artista-alchimista, come Glass Bricks del 1970-1971, e i lavori incentrati sugli alberi, che all’inizio degli anni settanta rappresentano una vera fonte d’ispirazione per l’artista. Particolare attenzione è stata posta, infine, ai famosi ‘tagli’, con cui Matta Clark seziona pareti, solai e interi edifici, secondo geometrie precise che ne alterano la percezione: una sorta di chirurgia dello spazio, che non solo e non tanto mutila, quanto scompone e ricompone la materia. Il catalogo, che rende conto anche della filmografia dell’artista, accoglie interventi critici di James Attlee, Jane Crawford, Louise Désy e Gwendolyn Owens, Lorenzo Fusi, Marco Pierini e un’intervista all’artista realizzata nel 1978 da Judith Russi Kirscher, ed è completato da apparati biobibliografici.

Rare catalogue of the exhibition at the Städtische Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, May 5th to June 4th, 1979

Transmission is a comprehensive examination of the relationship between the work of renowned surrealist Roberto Matta (1912–2002) and his son, conceptual artist, Gordon Matta-Clark (1943-1978). The book explores how Matta-Clark’s exposure to artistic circles of his father’s generation influenced the direction that his art would take, and how that played a role in the evolution of 1970s conceptual art. Essays draw parallels between the way each artist absorbed artistic and cultural trends to conceive new significant models for art. Sculpture, paintings, and works on paper by Matta, and sculpture, photographs, and works on paper by Matta-Clark are illustrated.

This beautifully produced book is published to coincide with a ground-breaking exhibition that opened at the CCA in Glasgow on 24 January 2003, and travels to the Architectural Association, London on 1 May. Curated by Lisa Le Feuvre, The Space Between will surely confirm Matta-Clark as one of the most important artists of the second half of the 20th century. Despite his tragically short career, the influence of Gordon Matta-Clark (1943-1978) is ever more pervasive. Central to the explosion of creativity in New York’s SoHo in the 1970s, Matta-Clark turned his focus on the city itself, slicing through abandoned buildings to create works that were at once large-scale sculptural environments, social commentary and urban performance pieces. His stated aim was to unravel the grammar of architecture and “turn a building into a state of mind”. The ‘building cuts’ remain the best-known of the artist’s works, despite the fact that they exist today only through film and photographic documentation. However, Matta-Clark’s engagement with the urban landscape and challenge to conventional art practice also led him to set up an artist-run restaurant, Food. Armed with a movie camera, he embarked on journeys of discovery inside the hidden spaces beneath Paris and London. He handed out free food and ‘fresh air’ on the streets, created architecture from refuse, and planned visionary architectural projects that would transform the City.

Gordon Matta-Clark (1943-1978) is one of the great heroes of late twentieth-century art, a cult figure as much in the contemporary art world as on the architecture scene, whose work is independent of any particular movement or school. This book is the first and definitive monograph on the artist, who died at the age of 35. Born in New York and trained in architecture, Gordon Matta-Clark is most famous for his slicing through the facades, walls and floors of derelict buildings. This ‘deconstructing gesture’ – provocative and extreme – turns works of architecture into astonishing sculptures, where the mass of the building is entwined with the light and air that penetrate it. Matta-Clark’s interventions are always grounded in social or political convictions. Some of his projects include opening a restaurant (Food, 1971) in the then-neglected district of SoHo in New York, purchasing at auction fractions of unusable urban land in New York (Reality Properties Fake Estates, 1973), dispensing oxygen to passers-by in the streets of New York from a self-made cart (Fresh Air Cart, 1972), and other visionary urban projects that he conceived as a founding member of the New York-based Anarchitecture group. His practice remains one of the most unique, unequalled and hugely influential of the past decades. A richly documented essay by Thomas Crow presents new and insightful perspectives on the work of the artist. Also included are original essays by Judith Russi Kirshner and Christian Kravagna, as well as a documents section composed of key unpublished and hard-to-find essays and interviews, compiled by editor Corinne Diserens.

“Gordon Matta-Clark – In the Belly of Anarchitect” is a project by Pierre Huyghe and Rirkrit Tiravanija in co-operation with the art historian Pamela M. Lee. It is the work of two artists around and through the oeuvre of Gordon Matta-Clark, the attempt of a transmission of a Matta-Clark-experience into the present. The project and the exhibition are based on a student workshop held at Frankfurt´s Städelschule under the direction of Hocine Bouhlou and represent a continuation of the art academy´s long tradition of close connections between art, cooking and architecture.

The gallery space of Portikus is blocked through a large wall made of bread. The bread has been baked in situ, and the visitors are invited to eat their way through the wall in order to enter the space. This physical experience is part of the approach to Gordon Matta-Clark. Inside the gallery space numerous actions and presentations will happen throughout the opening weekend. Pamela M. Lee will give a lecture with the title “The Raw and the Baked”. Huyghe and Tiravanija will split a cake-house. There will be baking, eating and Graffiti. Finally, a selection of Gordon Matta-Clark´s films will be screened until the end of the exhibition.

Cutting Matta-Clark: The Anarchitecture Investigation is a detective story. It relentlessly pursues the legendary but invisible Anarchitecture Group show and Gordon Matta-Clark’s celebrated, hyper-visible, yet equally misunderstood building cuts. Of all the shows at the fabled 112 Greene Street space―an epicenter of New York’s downtown art scene in the 1970s―the Anarchitecture Group show of March 1974 is a constant reference point in discussion, despite the almost complete lack of evidence about it. It has become a foundational myth. Gordon Matta-Clark was supposedly the ringleader of an extended series of meetings with fellow artists that operated as a kind of collective research seminar challenging all conventional understandings of architecture. The meetings of this so-called Anarchitecture Group culminated in the exhibition as an anonymous statement in unlabeled photographs. But did it actually happen? It exists only through oblique archival traces and the conflicting memories of the participants. An unprecedented dossier of unpublished archival evidence is assembled here and subjected to ever deeper forensic analysis―cutting into both the concepts and the cuts to see what the elusive, mysterious, seductive, yet viral word Anarchitecture offers us today.

Contains interviews with Tina Girouard, Jene Highstein, Dickie Landry, Jeffrey Lew, Richard Nonas, Bernard Kirschenbaum and Susan Weil Kirschenbaum.

American artist Gordon Matta-Clark is perhaps best known for the site-specific artworks he made in the 1970s. His body of work includes performance and recycling pieces, space and texture works, and his “building cuts”. Matta-Clark used a number of media to document his work, such as film, video, and photography, much of which appears in this catalogue, itself published on the occasion of an eponymous exhibition at the Serralves Museum of Contemporary Art, Porto, and Culturgest, Lisbon. The attractively designed book includes numerous of the artist’s own sketches and plans for various works, plus letters and other material that together form an in-depth portrait.

Images of the deconstruction of abandoned buildings and industrial structures are closely associated with “anarchitect” Gordon Matta-Clark. Often overlooked, however, are the film works through which Matta-Clark furthered his lifelong excavation of urban dwellings. In this book, San Francisco Cinematheque presents a retrospective of the moving-image works through which Matta-Clark explored his aesthetic assumptions and philosophical inquiry. Featuring rarely published images and a quartet of imaginative essays, City Slivers and Fresh Kills establishes Matta-Clarks films as perhaps his most surprising, and certainly most viscerally arresting body of work, characterized by the same creative provocation, rough aesthetic beauty, and intellectual insight that informed all of the artists famous architectural cuttings, slicings, and revelations.

The first overview of the unique encounter between artists and the prominent Marxist current Workerism, also known as Operaismo During the 1960s and 1970s, Workerism and Autonomia were prominent Marxist currents. However, it is rarely acknowledged that these movements inspired many visual artists such as the members of Archizoom, Gordon Matta-Clark and Gianfranco Baruchello.   This book focuses on the aesthetic and cultural discourse developed by three generations of militants (including Mario Tronti, Antonio Negri, Bifo and Silvia Federici), and how it was appropriated by artists, architects, graphic designers and architectural historians such as Manfredo Tafuri. Images of Classsignposts key moments of this dialogue, ranging from the drawings published on classe operaia to Potere Operaio’s exhibition in Paris, the Metropolitan Indians’ zines, a feminist art collective who adhered to the Wages for Housework Campaign, and the N group’s experiments with Gestalt theory.   Featuring more than 140 images of artworks, many published here for the first time, this volume provides an original perspective on post-war Italian culture and new insights into some of the most influential Marxist movements of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries worldwide.

Molly Nesbit shows how American pragmatism has informed art theory from Meyer Schapiro to T.J. Clark and Linda Nochlin First published in 2013 and quickly going out of print, Molly Nesbit’s The Pragmatism in the History of Art traces the questions that modern art history and theory has used to make sense of the changes overtaking both art and life. Opening with a consideration of pragmatism’s origins in the thought of Charles Sanders Pierce, William James and John Dewey, the book examines the overlaps and disparities between art and philosophy across several generations of art historians, crossing back and forth over the Atlantic. A genealogy emerges through case studies on the work of Schapiro, Henri Focillon, Alexander Dorner, George Kubler, Robert Herbert, T.J. Clark and Linda Nochlin. The philosophy of Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze and the films of Chris Marker and Jean-Luc Godard also show distinctly pragmatic effects. Artists discussed include Vincent van Gogh, Isamu Noguchi, Lawrence Weiner and Gordon Matta-Clark.

Timely and wide-ranging, this volume explores in-depth the theme of destruction in international contemporary art. While destruction as a theme can be traced throughout art history, from the early atomic age it has remained a pervasive and compelling element of contemporary visual culture. Damage Control features the work of more than 40 international artists working in a range of media—painting, sculpture, photography, film, installation, and performance—who have used destruction as a means of responding to their historical moment and as a strategy for inciting spectacle and catharsis, as a form of rebellion and protest, or as an essential part of re-creation and restoration. Including works by such diverse artists as Jean Tinguely, Andy Warhol, Bruce Conner, Yoko Ono, Gordon Matta-Clark, Pipilotti Rist, Yoshitomo Nara, and Laurel Nakadate, the book reaches beyond art to enable a broader understanding of culture and society in the aftermath of World War II, under the looming fear of annihilation in the atomic age, and in the age of terrorism and other disasters, real and imagined.

The New York proto-punk zine that defined postconceptualism, now in a facsimile edition

Edited by Walter Robinson, Edit DeAk and Joshua Cohn, Art-Rite was published in New York City between 1973 and 1978. The periodical has long been celebrated for its underground/overground position and its cutting, humorous, on-the-streets coverage and critique of the art world. Art-Rite moved easily through the expansive community it mapped out, paying homage to an emergent generation of artists, including many who were―or would soon become―the defining voices of the era. Through hundreds of interviews, reviews, statements and projects for the page―as well as artist-focused and thematic issues on video, painting, performance and artists’ books―Art-Rite‘s sharp editorial vision and commitment to holding up the work of artists stands as a meaningful and lasting contribution to the art history of New York and beyond. All issues of Art-Rite are collected in this volume.

Artists include: Vito Acconci, Kathy Acker, Bas Jan Ader, Laurie Anderson, John Baldessari, Gregory Battcock, Lynda Benglis, Mel Bochner, Marcel Broodthaers, Trisha Brown, Chris Burden, Scott Burton, Ulises Carrión, Judy Chicago, Lucinda Childs, Christo, Diego Cortez, Hanne Darboven, Agnes Denes, Ralston Farina, Richard Foreman, Peggy Gale, Gilbert & George, John Giorno, Philip Glass, Leon Golub, Peter Grass, Julia Heyward, Nancy Holt, Ray Johnson, Joan Jonas, Richard Kern, Lee Krasner, Shigeko Kubota, Les Levine, Sol LeWitt, Lucy Lippard, Babette Mangolte, Brice Marden, Agnes Martin, Gordon Matta-Clark, Rosemary Mayer, Annette Messager, Elizabeth Murray, Alice Neel, Brian O’Doherty, Genesis P-Orridge, Nam June Paik, Charlemagne Palestine, Judy Pfaff, Lil Picard, Yvonne Rainer, Dorothea Rockburne, Ed Ruscha, Robert Ryman, David Salle, Carolee Schneemann, Richard Serra, Jack Smith, Patti Smith, Robert Smithson, Holly Solomon, Naomi Spector, Nancy Spero, Pat Steir, Frank Stella, Alan Suicide (Vega), David Tremlett, Richard Tuttle, Andy Warhol, William Wegman, Lawrence Weiner, Hannah Wilke, Robert Wilson, Yuri and Irene von Zahn.

A groundbreaking history of pioneering alternative art venues in New York where artists experimented, exhibited, and performed outside the white cube and the commercial mainstream.

This groundbreaking book―part exhibition catalogue, part cultural history―chronicles alternative art spaces in New York City since the 1960s. Developed from an exhibition of the same name at Exit Art, Alternative Histories documents more than 130 alternative spaces, groups, and projects, and the significant contributions these organizations have made to the aesthetic and social fabric of New York City. Alternative art spaces offer sites for experimentation for artists to innovate, perform, and exhibit outside the commercial gallery-and-museum circuit. In New York City, the development of alternative spaces was almost synonymous with the rise of the contemporary art scene. Beginning in the 1960s and early 1970s, it was within a network of alternative sites―including 112 Greene Street, The Kitchen, P.S.1, FOOD, and many others―that the work of young artists like Yvonne Rainer, Vito Acconci, Gordon Matta-Clark, Ana Mendieta, David Wojnarowicz, David Hammons, Adrian Piper, Martin Wong, Jimmie Durham, and dozens of other now familiar names first circulated.

Through interviews, photographs, essays, and archival material, Alternative Histories tells the story of such famous sites and organizations as Judson Memorial Church, Anthology Film Archives, A.I.R. Gallery, El Museo del Barrio, Franklin Furnace, and Eyebeam, as well as many less well-known sites and organizations. Essays by the exhibition curators and scholars, and excerpts of interviews with alternative space founders and staff, provide cultural and historical context.

Contributors
Jacki Apple, Papo Colo, Jeanette Ingberman, Melissa Rachleff, Lauren Rosati, Mary Anne Staniszewski, Herb Tam

Interviewees
Steve Cannon, Rhys Chatham, Peter Cramer and Jack Waters, Carol Goodden, Alanna Heiss, Bob Lee, Joe Lewis, Inverna Lockpez,
Ann Philbin, Anne Sherwood Pundyk and Karen Yama, Irving Sandler, Adam Simon, Martha Wilson

This book begins with the observation that contemporary artists have embraced and employed gravity as an immaterial readymade. Necessarily focusing on material practices – chiefly sculpture, installation, performance, and film – this discussion takes account of how and why artists have used gravity and explores the similarities between their work and the popular cultural forms of circus, vaudeville, burlesque, and film. Works by Rodney Graham, Stan Douglas, and Robert Smithson are mediated through ideas of Gnostic doubt, atomism, and new materialism. In other examples – by John Wood and Paul Harrison, Gordon Matta-Clark, Peter Fischli and David Weiss, Trisha Brown, and Bas Jan Ader – mass and momentum, falling objects, and falling bodies are examined in relation to architecture, sculpture, and dance. In performances, projects and events curated by Bruce Nauman, Santiago Sierra, and Catherine Yass, gravity is resisted in Sisyphean ordeals and death-defying stunts. This account of contemporary art and performance, read through the invisible membrane of gravity, exposes new and distinctive approaches to agency reduction, authorial doubt, and redemptive failure.

With works by Michael Asher, Artist Placement Group, Can Altay, Conrad Atkinson, Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin, Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan, Banu Cennetoglu, Christopher D’Arcangelo, Martin Beck, Cevdet Erek, Andrea Fraser, Buckminster Fuller, Ryan Gander, Ella Gibbs, Frederick Kiesler, Lucy Kimbell, James Langdon, El Lissitzky, Peter Nadin, “The offices of Peter Fend, Coleen Fitzgibbon, Jenny Holzer, Peter Nadin, Richard Prince & Robin Winters,” Gordon Matta-Clark, Antoni Muntadas, Lilly Reich, Support Structure, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Lawrence Weiner, Christopher Williams, Carey Young, a.o. Support Structures is a manual for what bears, sustains, and props, for those things that encourage, care for, and assist; for that which advocates, articulates; for what stands behind, frames, and maintains: it is a manual for those things that give support. While the work of supporting might traditionally appear as subsequent, unessential, and lacking value in itself, this manual is an attempt to restore attention to one of the neglected, yet crucial modes through which we apprehend and shape the world. Support Structures is a critical enquiry into what constitutes “support,” and documents the collaborative project “Support Structure” by Céline Condorelli and Gavin Wade. While registering and collecting reference projects in a new archive of support structures alongside its ten-phase project, different writers, thinkers, and practitioners were invited from various fields to elaborate on frameworks and work on texts , which form the theoretical backbone of the publication. The collection of contributions offers different possibilities for engaging in this unchartered territory, from propositions to projects, existing systems to ones invented for specific creative processes. Support Structures offers support through potential methodologies, inspirations and activations for practice, and addresses important questions for art and architecture practices on forms of display, organization, articulation, appropriation, autonomy, and temporariness, and the manifestations of blindness towards them.

Shrinking cities have pushed urban design and classical city planning to their limits. The new challenges they pose require new approaches, joining the “hard” tools of construction with the “soft” tools of political, social, cultural and communications interventions. Shrinking Cities: Volume 2: Interventions provides an international overview of experimental concepts for taking action in shrinking cities, cataloguing tools from the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, urban construction, the media, performance and art. The approaches range from artistic intercessions and self-empowering projects to architectural and landscape interventions, and from strategies of media communication and city marketing to new legal regulations and utopian designs. A series of essays offers critical debate of both successful and failed projects of recent decades. Examples include the products of creative forces including William Alsop, Gordon Matta-Clark, Crimson, Jeremy Deller, OMA, Cedric Price, Andreas Siekmann, Robert Smithson, Stalker, Superflex and O. M. Ungers, in countries including the United States, Great Britain, the Netherlands, Austria, Russia and Japan.

Situation–a unique set of conditions produced in both space and time and ranging across material, social, political, and economic relations–has become a key concept in twenty-first-century art. Rooted in artistic practices of the 1960s and 1970s, the idea of situation has evolved and transcended these in the current context of globalization. This anthology offers key writings on areas of art practice and theory related to situation, including notions of the site specific, the artist as ethnographer or fieldworker, the relation between action and public space, the meaning of place and locality, and the crucial role of the curator in recent situation specific art. In North America and Europe, the site-specific is often viewed in terms of resistance to art’s commoditization, while elsewhere situation-specific practices have defied institutions of authority. The contributors discuss these recent tendencies in the context of proliferating international biennial exhibitions, curatorial place-bound projects, and strategies by which artists increasingly unsettle the definition and legitimation of situation-based art.Artists surveyed include [from Ian 1/30]Vito Acconci, Allora & Calzadilla, Francis Alÿs, Carl Andre, Artist Placement Group, Michael Asher, Amy Balkin, Ursula Biemann, Bik Van der Pol, Daniel Buren, Victor Burgin, Janet Cardiff, Center for Land Use Interpretation, Adam Chodzko, Collective Actions, Tacita Dean, Elmgreen & Dragset, Andrea Fraser, Hamish Fulton, Dan Graham, Liam Gillick, Renée Green, Group Material, Douglas Huebler, Bethan Huws, Pierre Huyghe, Robert Irwin, Emily Jacir, Ilya Kabakov, Leopold Kessler, Július Koller, Langlands & Bell, Ligna, Richard Long, Gordon Matta-Clark, Graeme Miller, Jonathan Monk, Robert Morris, Gabriel Orozco, Walid Ra’ad, Raqs Media Collective, Paul Rooney, Martha Rosler, Allen Ruppersberg, Richard Serra, Situationist International, Tony Smith, Robert Smithson, Vivan Sundaram, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Lawrence Weiner, Rachel Whiteread, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Qiu Zhijie Writers include Arjun Appaduri, Marc Augé, Wim Beeren, Josephine Berry Slater, Daniel Birnbaum, Ava Bromberg, Susan Buck-Morss, Michel de Certeau, Douglas Crimp, Gilles Deleuze, T. J. Demos, Rosalyn Deutsche, Thierry de Duve, Charles Esche, Graeme Evans, Patricia Falguières, Marina Fokidis, Hal Foster, Hou Hanrou, Brian Holmes, Mary Jane Jacob, Vasif Kortun, Miwon Kwon, Lu Jie, Doreen Massey, James Meyer, Ivo Mesquita, Brian O’Doherty, Craig Owens, Irit Rogoff, Peter Weibel

Certificates of authenticity are a critical aspect of art works today. They often embody the artwork itself, while referring to it, serving as its deed, legal statement, and fiscal invoice. Certificates by artists validate the authorship and originality of the work and they allow the work of art to be positioned in the marketplace as a branded product. Providing examples of artists certificates from the past fifty years, this book reveals how roles have shifted and developed, as well as how the materials and content of art have changed. With certificates by: Ruben Aubrecht, Judith Barry, Robert Barry/Stefan Brüggemann, Hemali Bhuta and Shreyas Karle, Pierre Bismuth, George Brecht, Marinus Boezem, Daniel Buren, Andre Caderé, Marcel Duchamp, Maria Eichhorn, Urs Fischer, Dan Flavin, Andrea Fraser, Liam Gillick, The Felix Gonzalez-Torres Foundation, Hans Haacke, Edward Kienholz, Yves Klein, Joseph Kosuth, Sol LeWitt, Ken Lum, Piero Manzoni, Gordon Matta-Clark, Josiah McElheny and Allan Kaprow, Jonathan Monk, Robert Morris, Antoni Muntadas, Yoko Ono, Cesare Pietroiusti, Adrian Piper, Emilio Prini, Robert Projansky and Seth Siegelaub, Raqs Media Collective, Robert Rauschenberg, Sharmila Samant, Joe Scanlan, David Shrigley, Daniel Spoerri, Haim Steinbach, Superflex, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Ben Vautier, Lawrence Weiner, Franz West, Cerith Wyn Evans, Carey Young, Andrea Zittel, Heimo Zobernig.

Reflecting on the decline of modernist utopianism, this volume surveys those artists who have explored and embraced its decay: Yona Friedman, Giuseppe Gabellone, Cyprien Gaillard, Isa Genzken, Dan Graham, Gordon Matta-Clark, Florian Pumhosl, Jeroen de Rijke & Willem de Rooij, Robert Smithson, Rob Voerman and Stephen Willats.

In recent years street art has grown bolder, more ornate, more sophisticated and—in many cases—more acceptable. Yet unsanctioned public art remains the problem child of cultural expression, the last outlaw of visual disciplines. It has also become a global phenomenon of the 21st century. Made in collaboration with featured artists, Trespass examines the rise and global reach of graffiti and urban art, tracing key figures, events and movements of self-expression in the city’s social space, and the history of urban reclamation, protest, and illicit performance. The first book to present the full historical sweep, global reach and technical developments of the street art movement, Trespass features key works by 150 artists, and connects four generations of visionary outlaws including Jean Tinguely, Spencer Tunick, Keith Haring, Os Gemeos, Jenny Holzer, Barry McGee, Gordon Matta-Clark, Shepard Fairey, Blu, Billboard Liberation Front, Guerrilla Girls and Banksy, among others. It also includes dozens of previously unpublished photographs of long-lost works and legendary, ephemeral urban artworks. Also includes: • Unpublished images of street art by Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat • Unpublished photographs by Subway Art luminary Martha Cooper • Unpublished photos from the personal archives of selected artists • Incisive essays by Anne Pasternak (director of public arts fund Creative Time) and civil rights lawyer Tony Serra • Special feature: exclusive preface by Banksy

This reprint of Avalanche by Primary Information makes the magazine available worldwide as a complete set for the first time in three decades. Originally published in magazine format for the first eight issues, Avalanche switched to newspaper format for the final five issues. This facsimile edition is a boxed set that houses the individual magazine issues and the newspapers bound in a single book form. Avalanche magazine was founded by Willoughby Sharp and Liza Béar shortly after they met in 1968. At the time, Sharp was a New York-based art historian and independent curator and Béar an underground magazine editor who had recently moved to New York from London. They published the first issue in 1970 and collaborated on 13 issues from 1970 to 1976. Avalanche focused on art from the perspective of artists rather than critics, and investigated new forms of art that were developing in the U.S. and Europe with a radical new media format—probing interviews and a visionary design that made extensive use of photography and dynamic layouts. For many artists, publication in Avalanche preceded a one-person gallery or museum show. Aside from an eight to twelve-page news section, the editorial content included only* interviews by Sharp and/or Béar, artists’ texts and documents of art and art making, also functioning as an exhibition space in print. Fresh, incisive and unpretentious, the Avalanche interviews—now landmarks—illuminate the creative process and give clear voice to the specific issues that permeated the era Among the featured artists were Vito Acconci, Laurie Anderson, Bill Beckley, Joseph Beuys, Chris Burden, Daniel Buren, Hanne Darboven, Walter De Maria, Jan Dibbets, Barbara Dilley, Simone Forti, Gilbert & George, the Philip Glass Ensemble, Grand Union, Hans Haacke, Jannis Kounellis, Meredith Monk, Barry Le Va, Sol LeWitt, Richard Long, Gordon Matta-Clark, Bruce Nauman, Dennis Oppenheim, Steve Paxton, Yvonne Rainer, Klaus Rinke, Joel Shapiro, Jack Smith, Keith Sonnier, Richard Serra, Robert Smithson, George Trakas, William Wegman, Lawrence Weiner, the Western Front and Jackie Winsor. This boxed facsimile edition of Avalanche’s complete run reproduces the first eight issues individually, and the final five in a single bound paperback. The publication, 1,016 pages and illustrated throughout, is housed in a heavy duty, laminated, archival box measuring 10.5 x 19.5 x 2.5 inches. The first eight issues measure 9.25 x 9.25 inches and are exact facsimiles of the originals; the subsequent five tabloid-sized issues, now bound as a single volume measuring 9.25 x 13.5 inches, have been reduced slightly in scale from the original format. INDEX: The Early History of Avalanche by Liza Béar and Willoughby Sharp. Square Magazine Format: Avalanche 1, Fall, 100 pages, b&w, Earth Art, 1970 Avalanche 2, Spring, 140 pages, b&w, Body Works, 1971 Avalanche 3, Fall, 100 pages, b&w, Post-Studio Sculpture, 1971 Avalanche 4, Spring, 100 pages, b&w, Conceptual Art, 1972 Avalanche 5, Summer, 84 pages, b&w, Performance, 1972 Avalanche 6, Fall, 100 pages, b&w, Vito Acconci, 1972 Avalanche 7, Winter/Spring, 84 pages, color, Humor, 1973 Avalanche 8, Summer/Fall, 84 pages, b&w, 1973 Tabloid Newspaper Format: Avalanche 9, May/June, 36 pages, b&w, Video Performance, 1974 Avalanche 10, December, 52 pages, b&w, 1974 Avalanche 11, Summer, 40 pages, b&w, 1975 Avalanche 12, Winter, 40 pages, b&w, 1975 Avalanche 13, Summer, 48 pages, two-color, 1976 Introductory quote was taken from The Early History of Avalanche, Chelsea Space, London, by Liza Béar and Willoughby Sharp, 2005.

“From Gordon Matta-Clark to Lawrence Weiner, Bruce Nauman to Alison Knowles, the question of site locates itself in issues of public space, at the intersection of the imagined and the real, at the juncture of performance and architectural production. By anthologizing essays, documents, and interviews by leading critics, historians, and artists on issues of site-specificity, conceptualism, feminism, and architecture practice, Surface Tension reveals the connections between cultural production and the very spaces in which such work functions. These textual explorations are complemented by extensive documentation of related projects, both historical and contemporary, by artists, architects, and performance artists, including Coughing Piece, a never-before released 1961 audio work by Yoko Ono; an obscure audio work by Nauman from 1969; projects by Suzanne Lacy, a leading figure in the development of conceptual practice and public art; and an experimental text by Jane Rendell on psychic architectures. Conversations occur between the pages of Surface Tension, between theoretical analysis and modes of practice, that activate the publication as a site itself, one participating in a broad field of knowledge. Includes an audio CD of the sound art pieces.”

The term “process art” describes a moment of radical, aformalexperimentation in postwar American sculpture. Through the medium ofdrawing, Afterimage revisits process art in terms of the artists whodefined the movement and suggests a transitional moment when many ofits practitioners anticipated the feminist and postminimalist art ofthe 1970s. Nancy Grossman’s use of language, for example, suggests akind of material abstraction, and Nancy Holt’s earth works and relateddrawings introduced content into a minimalist vocabulary. The bookalso explores the drawing as a residual object in works in which theprocess of making dictates the form of the drawing. Examples includeGordon Matta-Clark’s stacked cuttings, Robert Morris’ “blind time”drawings, and Sol Lewitt’s folded construction drawings. Other works,such as those by Bruce Nauman and Robert Smithson, record a particularapproach to body-based and process-oriented sculpture. The book, which accompanies an exhibition, contains an essayby Cornelia H. Butler on the historical ambiguity surrounding processart and one by Pamela M. Lee on temporality in work of the late1960s. The artists included in the book are William Anastasi, RichardArtschwager, Mel Bochner, Agnes Denes, Nancy Grossman, RobertGrosvenor, Marcia Hafif, Eva Hesse, Nancy Holt, Barry LeVa, SolLewitt, Lee Lozano, Sylvia Plimack Mangold, Gordon Matta-Clark, RobertMorris, Bruce Nauman, Yvonne Rainer, Dorothea Rockburne, Alan Saret,Joel Shapiro, Robert Smithson, Michelle Stuart, Richard Tuttle, and Jack Whitten.

In a work that will become indispensable to anyone seriously interested in modern art, Yve-Alain Bois and Rosalind Krauss convincingly introduce a new constellation of concepts to our understanding of avant-garde and modernist art practices. Formless: A User’s Guide constitutes a decisive and dramatic transformation of the study of twentieth-century culture. Although it has been over sixty years since Georges Bataille undertook his philosophical development of the term informe, only in recent years has the idea of the “formless” been deployed in theorizing and reconfiguring the very field of twentieth-century art. This is partly because that field has most often been crudely set up as a battle between form and content, whereas “formless” constitutes a third term that stands outside the opposition of form and content, outside the binary thinking that is itself formal. In Formless: A User’s Guide, Bois and Krauss, two of the most influential and respected art historians of our time, present a rich and compelling panorama of the formless. They map out its persistence within a history of modernism that has always repressed it in the interest of privileging formal mastery, and they assess its destiny within current artistic production. In the domain of practice, they analyze it as an operational tool, the structural cunning of which has repeatedly been suppressed in the service of a thematics of art. Neither theme nor form, formless is, as Bataille himself expressed it, a “job.” The job of Formless: A User’s Guide is to explore the power of the informe. A stunning new map of twentieth-century art emerges from this innovative reconceptualization and from the brilliantly original analyses of the work of Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, Cy Twombly, Lucio Fontana, Cindy Sherman, Claes Oldenburg, Jean Dubuffet, Robert Smithson, and Gordon Matta-Clark, among others.

This anthology presents over two decades of the most memorable issues and events of contemporary art as seen through the pages of Flash Art, the controversial, contradictory art magazine that has influenced both cultural taste and artistic development for twenty-one years. From Arte Povera, Process Art, Conceptual Art, Performance Art, and Post-Conceptualism to Pictures, the Transavantgarde, the East Village, and NeoConceptualism, Flash Art has functioned as both forum and catalyst for current art trends. The book includes such artists and theorists as Bernd and Hilla Becher, Rebecca Horn, Joseph Kosuth, John Baldessari, Gordon Matta-Clark, Sherrie Levine, Gilles Deleuze, Edward Ruscha, Mimmo Paladino, Jean-Francois Lyotard, Frank Stella, Julia Kristeva, Jean Baudrillard, Fredric Jameson, Jeff Koons, Donald Judd, Peter Halley, David Salle, Gerhard Richter, and Germano Celant. It documents the magazine’s policy and trajectory throughout the course of contemporary culture a policy that has been consistently concerned with capturing the new and the radical, transforming them inevitably, into the event.

 

 

Over the last twenty years an increasing number of artists have turned to expressing themselves through postcards. Whether by way of installation, collage, addition to, or alteration of existing postcards, or the production of postcards themselves, many prominent artists employ the medium in some form. Artists’ Postcards traces the origin of artists’ fascination with postcards from the early 1900s but with a focus on the contemporary, revealing the significant number of artists who have made creative and unusual artworks in postcard form. With 400 images of postcards created by many well-known artists, Artists’ Postcards is the first critical guide to the subject. From surrealists to Fluxus and conceptual artists, this book includes an array of historical and contemporary postcards by such artists as George Grosz, Bruce Nauman, Richard Long, David Hockney, Richard Hamilton, Susan Hiller, Joseph Beuys, Ben Vautier, Dieter Roth, Ray Johnson, Gordon Matta-Clark, Gavin Turk, Tacita Dean, Gilbert and George and Rachel Whiteread. Artists’ Postcards will be of interest to artists and graphic designers, as well as to postcard collectors.

Tree Dance, a performance created for the exhibition Twenty-Six by Twenty-Six at the then Vassar College Art Gallery. Tree Dance is not one of Matta-Clark’s “anarchitecture” pieces but rather a work that uses a different, more delicate method to create apertures within static structures. The work involved the suspension of netted, womb-like cocoons and rope ladders from the top of a large tree in front of the Vassar Chapel. Matta-Clark enlisted the help of Vassar dancers who soon found themselves performing Cirque du Soleil-esque acrobatics as they interacted with the vertiginous space. Tree Dance was a temporary work and so the performance was captured on film—creating a work within, or perhaps born out of, the primary work, much like the photo collages that document Circus. Like the original building in Chicago that became Circus, the tree where Matta-Clark and the Vassar Dance Troupe swung from ladder to ladder, punctuating the calligraphic lines drawn by the branches with slips of movement, is now gone. However, these absences seem to be almost perfect continuations of the works themselves. The originals live on in the works that were born out of their transitory presences and thus live on as traces that call out the necessity for continual transformation. Both Circus and Tree Dance, in their ephemerality, present a resistance to stasis that drives a commitment to progress and to challenging established conceptions and fixed notions of knowledge—a commitment that has marked, and will hopefully continue to mark, the spirit of the Vassar community. This rare catalogue contains the reproduction of a telegram by Gordon Matta-Clark and a drawing for the Tree Dance performance.

Artists: Marina Abramovic, Carmen Almon, Luiz Alphonsus, Ben d’Armagnac, John M. Armleder, Conrad Atkinson, Christian Ludwig Attersee, Alice Aycock, Lewis Baltz, Jack Barth, Jennifer Bartlett, Lynda Benglis, Jaap Berghuis, Mari Boeyen, Michal Bogucki, Christian Boltanski, Hans Brosch, Ian Carr-Harris, Luciano Castelli, Louis Chacallis, Pinchas Cohen-Gan, Paolo Cotani, Groupe Coum, Michael Craig-Martin, Gerrit Dekker, Martin Disler, Goran Djordjevic, Noel Dolla, Ugo Dossi, Juan Downey, Michael Druks, Markus Duik, David Dye, Pablo Echaurren, I.R.G., Bob Evans, Valie Export, Helmut Federle, John C. Fernie, Guy Fihman, Barry Flanagan, Emil Forman, Terry Fox, Hermine Freed, Iole de Fretas, Kazumichi Fujiwara, Marie-Louise de Geer-Bergenstrahle, Andreas Gehr, Wim Gijzen, Marcia Giluly, Gary-John Glaser, Gyula Gulyas, Nigel Hall, Jene Highstein, Naoyoshi Hikosaka, Hans van Hoek, Alain d’Hooghe, Rebecca Horn, Pierre Alain Hubert, Vivien Isnard, Bernard Joubert, Etsutomu Kashihara, Theatre Kassaknak, Pierre Keller, Nancy Kitchel, Wolf Knoebel, Rob van Koningsbruggen, Miloslav Laky, Darcy Lange, Terence-David LaNoue, Kang-So Lee, Barbara et Michael Leisgen, Barbara Linkevitch, Natalia LL Permato, Bernd Lohaus, Jeffrey Lowe, Urs Luthy, Groupe Lyn, Renato Maestri, Tim Mapston, Bill Martin, Gordon Matta-Clark, Anthony McCall, Ronald Michaelson, Samuel Montealegre, Miloslav Mucha, Gregoire Muller, Antonio Muntadas, Tsuneo Nakai, Hitoshi Nomura, Jacques Louis Nyst, Anna Opperman, Bernard Pages, Friederike Pezold, Walter Pfeiffer, Jean-Pierre Pincemin, Howardena D. Pindell, Fabrizio Plessi, Litiana Porter, Ulrike Rosenbach, Martin Rous, Moon-Seup Shim, Alex Silber, Charles Simonds, Alan Sonfist, Keith Sonnier, Judith Stein, John Setzaker, Ben Sveinsson, Kyoji Takubo, Gage Taylor, Olivier Thorme, Francesc Torres, Andre Valensi, Jean-Louis Vila, Hanna Villiger, William Viola, Tetsuya Watanabe, van de Wint, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Troels Worsel, Jan Zavarsky, Michele Zaza

Spanning from Minimalism to Land Art, this selection of the most important drawings from the Marzona Collection at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin features key American and European works, as well as all sorts of related studies and ephemera. Artists: Vito Acconci, Carl Andre, Giovanni Anselmo, Stephen Antonakos, Art & Language, David Askevold, Robert Barry, Ronald Bladen, Mel Bochner, Bill Bollinger, Stanley Brouwn, James Lee Byars, Jacques Charlier, Hanne Darboven, Walter de Maria, Jan Dibbets, Peter Downsbrough, Hamish Fulton, Gilbert & George, Michael Heizer, Douglas Huebler, On Kawara, Joseph Kosuth, Iannis Kounellis, Gary Kuehn, Barry Le Va, Sol LeWitt, Richard Long, Gordon Matta-Clark, Mario Merz, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Dennis Oppenheim, Blinky Palermo, Giulio Paolini, Anne and Patrick Poirier, David Rabinowitch, Mel Ramsden, Ulrich Rückriem, Edward Ruscha, Reiner Ruthenbeck, Fred Sandback, Gerry Schum, Robert Smithson, Lawrence Weiner,

When recession-plagued New York City abandoned its industrial base in the 1970s, performance artists, photographers, and filmmakers found their own mixed uses for the city’s run-down lofts, abandoned piers, vacant lots, and deserted streets. Gordon Matta-Clark turned a sanitation pier into the celebrated work Day’s End and Betsy Sussler filmed its making; the photographic team Shunk-Kender shot a vast series of images of Willoughby Sharp’s Projects: Pier 18 (which included work by Vito Acconci, Mel Bochner, Dan Graham, Matta-Clark, and William Wegman, among others); and Cindy Sherman staged some of her Untitled Film Stills on the streets of Lower Manhattan. Mixed Use, Manhattan documents and illustrates these projects as well as more recent work by artists who continue to engage with the city’s public, underground, and improvised spaces. The book (which accompanies a major exhibition) focuses on several important photographic series: Peter Hujar’s 1976 nighttime photographs of Manhattan’s West Side; Alvin Baltrop’s Hudson River pier photographs from 1975-1985, most of which have never before been shown or published; David Wojnarowicz’s Rimbaud in New York (1978-1979), the first of Wojnarowicz’s works to be published; and several of Zoe Leonard’s photographic projects from the late 1990s on. The book includes 70 color and 130 black-and-white images, a chronology of the policy decisions and developments that altered the face of New York City from 1950 to the present; an autobiographical story by David Wojnarowicz; and essays by Johanna Burton, Lytle Shaw, Juan Suarez, and the exhibition’s curators, Lynne Cooke and Douglas Crimp. Artist included: Alvin Baltrop, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Dara Birnbaum, Jennifer Bolande, Stefan Brecht, Matthew Buckingham, Tom Burr, Roy Colmer, Moyra Davey, Terry Fox, William Gedney, Bernard Guillot, David Hammons, Sharon Hayes, Peter Hujar, Joan Jonas, Louise Lawler, Zoe Leonard, Sol LeWitt, Glenn Ligon, Robert Longo, Vera Lutter, Danny Lyon, Babette Mangolte, Gordon Matta-Clark, Steve McQueen, John Miller, Donald Moffett, James Nares, Max Neuhaus, Catherine Opie, Gabriel Orozco, Barbara Probst, Emily Roysdon, Cindy Sherman, Harry Shunk & Janos Kender, Charles Simonds, Thomas Struth, James Welling, David Wojnarowicz, and Christopher Wool

Open Systems examines how international artists rethought the object of art in the last years of the 1960s and the early 1970s as they sought to connect with the increasingly urgent political developments of the time. Building on the structures of Minimalism and Conceptualism, the era saw the beginning of a radical departure from art’s traditional focus to a new and wide-ranging experimentation with mediums that included dance, performance, and, most notably, film and video. Open Systems features the works of prominent artists working in Britain, Europe, South America, Japan, and the United States, and includes sculpture, sculptural installations, painting, film, video, photography, and printed matter. Among the artists examined are Alighiero Boetti, Marcel Broodthaers, Trisha Brown, Fluxus, Dan Graham, Ilya Kabakov, Richard Long, Gordon Matta-Clark, Paul McCarthy, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, On Kawara, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Gerhard Richter, Robert Smithson, Martha Rosler, and Franz West.

Among the many lessons we have learned from photography since its inception are a few about the nature of reality and its representation. Long considered a mirror image of the real world, a direct and objective record of what exists in the visual stratosphere, the photograph has come to be understood as something much more complicated and variable, something easily manipulated and modified. Subjective Realities is thus a most apt title for this publication, which presents a stellar selection of contemporary photography from the Refco Collection. Included are works by Vito Acconci, Janine Antoni, Matthew Barney, Chris Burden, Jean-Marc Bustamante, Sophie Calle, Gregory Crewdson, Rineke Dijkstra, Olafur Eliasson, Barbara Ess, Walker Evans, Adam Fuss, Ann Hamilton, Eva Hesse, Axel Hutte, Seydou Keita, Inigo Manglano-Ovalle, Ana Mendieta, Gordon Matta-Clark, Mariko Mori, Catherine Opie, Richard Prince, and many, many more artists. An essay by Dave Hickey introduces the book, and short texts on individual artists have been contributed by Lynne Cooke, Kathryn Hixson, A.M. Homes, Glenn O’Brien, Saul Ostrow, Luc Sante, Katy Siegel, and others. Edited by Adam Brooks.~Essays by Lynne Cooke, Dave Hickey, A.M. Homes, David Rimanelli and Katy Siegel. ~Introduction by Judith Russi Kirshner.

“A comprehensive study of the field of kinetic art which, although practiced by many notable artists, has remained relatively hidden from a large audience because of its under-representation in art museums and publications. Force Fields examines the entire history of the art form, covering works from the 1920’s through the 1980’s. Featured artists include Marcel Duchamp, Lazslo Moholy-Nagy, Alexander Calder, Lucio Fontana, Yves Klein, Piero Manzoni, Jean Tinguely, Henri Michaux, James Whitney, Takis, Fran ois Morellet, Jesus Rafael Soto, Pol Bury, Sergio Camargo, Sol LeWitt, Gego, Helio Oticia, Mira Schendel, Lygia Clark, Robert Smithson, Gordon Matta-Clark, Agnes Denes, Hans Haacke, Medalla, Dieter Roth, Len Lye, Liliane Lijn, Julio le Parc, Li Yuan-Chia, Dom Sylvester Houedard, Leandre Crist/fol and John Latham, among others.”

Contents: Europe in Soho – Paula COOPER, , ARMAN, Marcel, DUCHAMP, GILBERT & GEORGE, Pier Paolo CALZOLARI, Mario MERZ, Giulio PAOLINI, Alighiero BOETTI, Piero MANZONI, Hans HAACKE, Jannis KOUNELLIS, Giovanni ANSELMO, Ulrich RUCKRIEM, SALVO, Joseph BEUYS, Jan DIBBETS, Hanne DARBOVEN, Laura GRISI, Gerhard RICHTER, Daniel BUREN, Christian BOLTANSKI, Jean LE GAC, Roman OPALKA, Richard LONG, Arthur KOPCKE, Hanne DARBOVEN, Ben VAUTRIER, Rebecca HORN, Robert FILLIOU Fluxus in New York – LA MONTE YOUNG, Gorge MACIUNAS, Takehisa KOSUGI, Benjamin PATTERSON, George BRECHT, Robert WATTS, Takako SAITO, Al HANSEN, Larry MILLERS, NAM JUNE PAIK Street Works Downtown – Scott BURTON, Stephen VARBLE, Adrian PIPER, Richard HAYMAN, Donna HENES, Rosemarie CASTORO, Daniel BUREN, Joan JONAS, Trisha BROWN, Mary MISS, Gordon MATTA-CLARK, Richard SERRA, Vito ACCONCI, Yayoi KUSAMA SOHO DU MAL. Film, Video, Culture, Politics – Dennis OPPENHEIM, Dan GRAHAM, Roger CUTFORTH, Peter CAMPUS, Michael SNOW, Douglas DAVIS, Shigeko KUBOTA, Joseph BEUYS, NAM JUNE PAIK, John CAGE, Jaime DAVIDOVICH, Mary LUCIER, Liza BEAR Music, Tanz, Performance – Mabou MINES, Richard FOREMAN, Merce CUNNINGHAM, GRAND UNION, David TUDOR, John CAGE, Robert ASHLEY, Gordon MUMMA, Alvin LUCIER, Jim BURTON, David BEHRMAN, Steve REICH, Philip GLASS, Meredith MONK, Viola FARBER, Lucinda CHILDS, Joan LA BARBARA, Robert WATTS, Simone FORTI, Charlemagne PALESTINE, Giuseppe CHIARI, Laurie ANDERSON,

Band 1: malerei, plastik, performance.- Band 2: fotografie film video.- Band 3: handzeichnungen, utopisches design, bücher.- Artsts: Berenice Abbott, Hermann Albert, Carl Andre, Ben d’Armagnac, Christian Ludwig Attersee, Vito Acconci, Pierre Alechinsky, Theo Angelopoulos, Arman (Armand Fernandez), Bernhard Aubertin, Valerio Adami, Gerhard Altenbourg, Ottomar Anschütz, Fernando Arrabal, Joannis Avramidis, Robert Adamson, Robert Altman, Horst Antes, Eduardo Arroyo, Alice Aycock, Peter Ackermann, Anatol, Ant Farm, Art & Language, Billy Adler, Gisela Andersch, Shusaku Arakawa, David Askevold, Chantal Akerman, Laurie Anderson, Diane Arbus, Eugène Atget, Francis Bacon, Monika Baumgartl, Joseph Beuys, Fernando Botero, Kevin Brownlow & Andrew Mollo, Michael Badura, Hippolyte Bayard, Michael von Biel, Margaret Bourke-White, Günter Brus, Eduard Denis Baldús, Thomas Bayrle, Werner Bischof, Mathew B. Brady, Anatol Brosilowsky, Balthus, Cecil Beaton, Louis-Auguste Bisson & Auguste-Rosalie Bisson, Brassaï (Gyula Halász), Wojciech Bruszewski, Joachim Bandau, Bernd e Hilla Becher, Irma Blanck, George Brecht, Luis Buñuel, Jared Bark, Stephan Beck, Karl Blossfeldt, KP Brehmer, Chris Burden, Robert Barry, Bill Beckley, Bernhard Blume, George Hendrik Breitner, Daniel Buren, Jennifer Bartlett, John Ernest Joseph Bellocq, Mel Bochner, Heinz Breloh, Scott Burton, Gianfranco Baruchello, Carmelo Bene, Peter Bogdanovich, Robert Bresson, Michael Buthe, Giorgio Batistella, Franz Bernhard, Claus Böhmler, Stuart Brisley, James Lee Byars, Gerd Baukhage, Jean-Marie Bertholin, Blythe Bohnen, Jürgen Brodwolf, Horst H. Baumann, Nuccio Bertone, Karl Bohrmann, Marcel Broodthaers, Bodo Baumgarten, Jean-Louis Bertucelli, Christian Boltanski, Stanley Brouwn, Enzo Cacciola, Robert Capa, Barbara Chase-Riboud, Pinchas Cohen-Gan, Michael Craig-Martin, Julia Margaret Cameron, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Eduardo Chillida, James Collins, Fritz Cremer, Colin Campell, Étienne Carjat, Christo, Miguel Condé, José Luis Cuevas, Peter Campus, Ugo Carrega, Chryssa, Tony Conrad, Edward Curtis, Louis Cane, Lewis Carroll, Chuck Close, Steven Cortright, Veassis Caniaris, Claude Chabrol, Harold Cohen, Claudio Costa, Miodrag Djuric (Dado), Douglas Davis, Walter De Maria, Jim Dine, Juan Downey, Louis Daguerre, Ger Dekkers, Agnes Denes, Henry + Bool Alfred + John Dixon, Peter Downsborough, Hanne Darboven, Willem de Kooning, Fred Deux, Dore O., Michael Druks, Alan Davie, Philip Henry Delamotte, Jan Dibbets, Ugo Dossi, Marcel Duchamp, John Davies, Jack Delano, Braco Dimitrijevic, Christian Dotremont, David Douglas Duncan, Don Eddy, Paul Eliasberg, Heinz Emigholz, Ulrich Erben, Walker Evans, Benni Efrat, Ger van Elk, Ed Emshwiller, Hugo Erfurth, Valie Export, Sergej Eisenstein, Peter Henry Emerson, Leo Erb, Garth Evans, Öyvind Fahlström, Federico Fellini, Dan Flavin, Charles Frazier, Lee Friedlander, Herbert Falken, Roger Fenton, Richard Fleischer, Hermine Freed, Hamish Fulton, Ralston Farina, Armand Fernandez, Lucio Fontana, Will Frenken, Heidi Fasnacht, Vincenzo Ferrari, Fred Forest, Achim Freyer, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Robert Filliou, Terry Fox, Gisèle Freund, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Wolfgang Gäfgen, Jochen Gerz, Tina Girouard, Dan Graham, Nancy Graves, Abel Gance, Paul-Armand Gette, Michael Gitlin, Eve Gramatzki, Alan Green, Alexander Gardner, Peter Gidal, Wilhelm von Gloeden, Tom J. Gramse, Marty Greenbaum, Winfred Gaul, Wolfram Giersbach, Jean-Luc Godard, Gotthard Graubner, Alberto Grifi, Rupprecht Geiger, Gilbert & George, Hubertus Gojowczyk, Nancy Graves, Robert Grosvenor, Michael Geissler, Frank Gilette, Kuno Gonschior, Walter Grasskamp, Hetum Gruber, Arnold Genthe, Raimund Girke, Camille Graeser, Gotthard Graubner, Renato Guttuso, Roel D’Haese, Haus-Rucker-Co, Wilhelm Hein, Lewis Hine, Nan Hoover, Helfried Hagenberg, Erich Hauser, Bernhard Heisig, Leon Hirszman, Rebecca Horn, David Hall, Lady Hawarden, Michael Heizer, Antonius Höckelmann, Horst P. Horst, Nigel Hall, Ron Hays, Al Held, David Hockney, George Hoyningen-Huene, Phillipe Halsman, Tim Head, Werner Herzog, Anatol Herzfeld, Alfred Hofkunst, Richard Hamilton, Erwin Heerich, Eva Hesse, Rudolf Hoflehner, Douglas Huebler, Heijo Hangen, Axel Heibel, David Octavius Hill, Edgar Hofschen, Danièle Huillet, Noriyuki Haraguchi, Birgit Hein, John Hilliard, Hans Hollein, Alfonso Hüppi, Karl Horst Hödicke, Shohei Imamura, Will Insley, Jean Ipoustéguy, Patrick Ireland, Hans Paul Isenrath, Ken Jacobs, Paul Jaray, Jasper Johns, Francis Benjamin Johnston, Miklós Jancsó, Jo Jastram, J. Douglas Johnson, Donald Judd, Horst Janssen, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Joan Jonas, Martha Jungwirth, Wolf Kahlen, Buster Keaton, Jürgen Klauke, Beril Korot, Ferdinand Kriwet, Max Kaminski, Ellsworth Kelly, Alexander Kluge, Joseph Kosuth, Germaine Krull, Howard Kanovitz, Michael Kenny, Werner Knaupp, Jannis Kounellis, Shigeko Kubota, Tadeusz Kantor, André Kertész, Günther Knipp, Andras Kovács, Stanley Kubrick, Allan Kaprow, Anselm Kiefer, Milan Knížák, Attila Kovács, Gary Kuehn, Dani Karavan, Harry Kipper, Imi Knoebel, Kurt Kren, Marin Karmitz, Alain Kirili, Alice Kochs, Dieter Krieg, Gertrude Kasebier, Ronald B. Kitaj, Christof Kohlhöfer, Richard Kriesche, On Kawara, Konrad Klapheck, Jiří Kolář, Les Krims, Willem de Kooning, László Lakner, Barry Le Va, Michael Leisgen, Lawrence Lobe, Urs Lüthi, Arthur Lamothe, Russell Lee, Les Levine, Francisco Lopez, Georg Platt Lynes, Richard Landry, Jean Le Gac, Sol LeWitt, Antonio Lopez-Garcia, Nikolaus Lang, Gustave Le Gray, Roy Lichtenstein, Joseph Losey, Dorothea Lange, Malcolm Le Grice, Richard Lindner, Bernhard Luginbühl, John Latham, Barbara Leisgen, Michael Lingner, Bernhard Lüthi, Heinz Mack, Kenneth Martin, Gerhard Merz, Alexander Mitta, Robert Morris, Nino Malfatti, Charles Marville, Mario Merz, Milan Mölzer, Alfons Maria Mucha, Felix H. Man (Hans Baumann), Roberto Matta, Borg Mesch, Bernard Moninot, Ugo Mulas, Robert Mangold, Gordon Matta-Clark, Anette Messager, Henry Moore, Antoni Muntadas, Andy Mann, Wolfgang Mattheuer, Adolphe de Meyer, Stefan Moore, Walter Murch, Werner Mantz, Cynthia Lee Maughan, Duane Michals, Carmengloria Morales, J.-J. Murphy, Piero Manzoni, Antony McCall, Henri Michaux, Marcello Morandini, Zoran Mušič, Giacomo Manzù, Barry McCallion, Rune Mields, Pit Morell, Eadweard Muybridge, Robert Mapplethorpe, Bruce McLean, Antoni Miralda, François Morellet, Brice Marden, Syd Mead, Josef Mikl, Maria Moreno, Agnes Martin, Dariush Mehrjui, Joan Miró, Malcolm Morley, Tomitaro Nachi, Bruce Nauman, Wolfgang Nestler, Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, Maria Nordman, Félix Nadar, Charles Nègre, Richard Newton, Ansgar Nierhoff, Gabriele & Helmut Nothhelfer, Maurizio Nannucci, Werner Nekes, Max Neuhaus, Richard Nonas, Lev V. Nussberg, Dore O., Timothy O’Sullivan, Roman Opalka, Nagisa Oshima, Oswald Oberhuber, Claes Oldenburg, Dennis Oppenheim, Jean Otth, Brian O’Doherty, Claudio Olivieri, Anna Oppermann, Hilmar Pabel, Giulio Paolini, A. R. Penck, Pablo Picasso, Lucio Pozzi, Nam June Paik, Eduardo Paolozzi, Peng-Wan-Ts, Otto Piene, Heinz-Günter Prager, Blinky Palermo, Gordon Parks, Beverly Pepper, Walter Pichler, Mario Prassinos, Magnus Palsson, Sergei Paradschanow, Elio Petri, Anne & Patrick Poirier, Panamarenko, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Wolfgang Petrick, Sigmar Polke, Gina Pane, Max Peintner, Friederike Pezold, Don Potts, Isabel Quintanilla, Daniel Quintero, William Raban, John Reilly, Jacob August Riis, Peter Roehr, Ed Ruscha, David Rabinowitch, James Reineking, Bridget Riley, Ulrike Rosenbach, Ken Russell, Arnulf Rainer, Albert Renger-Patzsch, Klaus Rinke, James Rosenquist, Claude Rutault, Yvonne Rainer, Jean Renoir, Larry Rivers, Francesco Rosi, Reiner Ruthenbeck, Robert Rauschenberg, Alain Resnais, Jacques Rivette, Roberto Rossellini, Robert Ryman, Man Ray, Erich Reusch, Józef Robakowski, Dieter Roth, Éric Rohmer, Tony Ray-Jones, Hans Peter Reuter, Dorothea Rockburne, Arthur Rothstein, Martial Raysse, George Warren Rickey, Alexander Rodtschenko, Gerhard Rühm, Reindeer Werk, Hans Salentin, Tomas Schmit, Eugen Schönebeck, Michael Singer, Edward Steichen, Sohrab Shadid Saless, Wolfgang Schmitz, Martin Schwarz (Künstler), Willi Sitte, Saul Steinberg, Erich Salomon, Helmut Schober, Martin Scorsese, Neal Slavin, Frank Stella, Lucas Samaras, Eugen Schönebeck, George Segal, David Smith, Alfred Stieglitz, Fred Sandback, Ben Schonzeit, Antonio Seguí, Robert Smithson, Sir Benjamin Stone, August Sander, Rudolf Schoofs, Friedrich Seidenstücker, Fernando Ezequiel Solanas, Paul Strand, Sarkis Zabunyan, Jan Schoonhoven, Richard Serra, Michael Snow, Jean-Marie Straub, Antonio Saura, Werner Schroeter, Ben Shahn, Alan Sonfist, Liselotte Strelow, Konrad Balder Schäuffelen, Heinz Schubert, Joel Shapiro, Eve Sonneman, Michell Stuart, Georgij Schengalaja, Alf Schuler, Charles Sheeler, Keith Sonnier, Josef Sudek, Alexander Schleber, HA Schult, Stephen Shore, Daniel Spoerri, István Szábo, Barbara Schmidt-Heins, Bernard Schultze, Katharina Sieverding, Klaus Staeck, Gabriele Schmidt-Heins, Emil Schumacher, Charles Simonds, Ted Stamm, Jiro Takamatsu, Andrej Tarkowskij, George Trakas, Peter Tuma, Vassilakis Takis, André Thomkins, François Truffaut, Deborah Turbeville, William Henry Fox Talbot, Jean Tinguely, Costas Tsoclis, Richard Tuttle, Antoni Tàpies, Gérard Titus-Carmel, Werner Tübke, Cy Twombly,Günther Uecker, Lee U Fan, Timm Ulrichs, Ursula Schultze-Bluhm, Giuliano Vangi, Wladimir Veličkovič, Bill Viola, Klaus Vogelsang, Hannsjörg Voth, Agnès Varda, Bernard Venet, Luchino Visconti, Wolf Vostell, Andrzej Wajda, Weegee, Orson Welles, Gottfried Wiegand, Claus Peter Wittig, Willie Walker, William Wegman, Wim Wenders, Klaus Wildenhahn, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Franz Erhard Walther, Peter Weibel, Lina Wertmüller, Dorothee von Windheim, Erwin Wortelkamp, Andy Warhol, Lawrence Weiner, Dsiga Wertow, Gerd Winner, Fritz Wotruba, Ryszard Wasko, Roger Welch, Marthe Wéry, Reindert Wepko van de Wint, Klaus Wyborny, Wolfgang Weber, Peter Weller, Tom Wesselmann, Rainer Wittenborn, Keigo Yamamoto, Yves Yerson, Yoshio Yoshida, Frank Young, Herbert Zangs, Gianfranco Zappettini, Jerry Zeniuk, Heinrich Zille, Krzysztof Zanussi, Michele Zaza, Christian Ziewer, Zush

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