Wanderlust highlights artists as voyagers who leave their studios to make art. This book (and the exhibition it accompanies) is the first comprehensive survey of the artist’s need to roam and the work that emerges from this need. Wanderlust presents the work of under-recognized yet pioneering artists alongside their well-known counterparts, and represents works that vary in process, with some artists working as solitary figures implanting themselves physically on the landscape while others perform and create movements in a collaborative manner or in public.

Many of the earlier works use what were at the time nontraditional methods of art making. In Trail Markers (1969), for example, Nancy Holt spent time in the English countryside, where she documented the painted orange trail markers she found dotting the landscape. Vito Acconci explored his body’s “occupancy” of public space through the execution of preconceived actions or activities. In Following Piece (1969), Acconci followed one randomly chosen stranger through the streets of New York. A Line Made by Walking (1967), a black-and-white photograph of Richard Long’s imprint of a straight line in a field, was Long’s first walking art work, made on a journey to St Martin’s from his home in Bristol. Ana Mendieta’s influential Silueta Works in Mexico (1977) documents performances by the artist during her travel between Iowa and Mexico, in which she imprints her body on the landscape while addressing issues of displacement.

Each of these works recognizes the walk and the journey as much more than just a basic human act. Rebecca Solnit observes that walking replicates thinking, adding “the motions of the mind cannot be traced, but those of the feet can.” These works trace the motions of wandering artists’ focused minds.

Artists include Vito Acconci, Bas Jan Ader, Nevin Aladag, Francis Alÿs, Janine Antoni, John Baldessari, Kim Beck, Roberley Bell, Blue Republic, Sophie Calle, Rosemarie Castoro, Cardiff/Miller, Zoe Crosher, Fallen Fruit, Mona Hatoum, Nancy Holt, Kenneth Josephson, William Lamson, Richard Long, Marie Lorenz, Mary Mattingly, Anthony McCall, Ana Mendieta, Teresa Murak, Wangechi Mutu, Efrat Natan, Gabriel Orozco, Carmen Papalia, John Pfahl, Pope.L, Teri Rueb, Michael X. Ryan, Todd Shalom, Mary Ellen Strom, and Guido van der Werve. 

Contributors Rachel Adams, Lucy Ainsworth, Andrew Barron, Pamela Campanaro, Andy Campbell, Hannah Cattarin, Ian Cofre, Jamie DiSarno, Katherine Finerty, Joshua Fischer, Natalie Fleming, Melanie Flood, Jason Foumberg, Allison Glenn, Kate Green, Ross Stanton Jordan, Anna Kaplan, Jamilee Lacy, Jennie Lamensdorf, Toby Lawrence, Jane McFadden, Lynnette Miranda, Conor Moynihan, Liz Munsell, Karen Patterson, Ariel Lauren Pittman, Sean Ripple, Eve Schillo, Holly Shen, Rebecca Solnit, Lexi Lee Sullivan, Whitney Tassie, Charlie Tatum, Zoë Taleporos, Lori Waxman

The Art of Walking: A Field Guide is a unique look at walking as a mode of artistic practice and is the first book to explore this fascinating subject of how walking can be used as an artistic medium.

An introductory essay identifies breaks and continuities between walking artists now and the pedestrian activities of the historic- and neo-avant-gardes of the early- and mid-20th Century, respectively. Subsequent visually-led sections deal with recent art engaging with different types of walkers including pilgrims, peripatetic writers and philosophers, dandies, drifters, marchers, stalkers, tour guides and dog walkers.

Artists to be evaluated include Marina Abramovic and Ulay, Vito Acconci, Dennis Adams, Francis Alÿs, Keith Arnatt, Tim Brennan, Stanley Brouwn, Bruce Nauman, Sophie Calle, Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller, Jeremy Deller, Simon Faithfull, Hamish Fulton, Regina José Galindo, Mona Hatoum, Akira Kanayama, Richard Long, The Long March Foundation, Melanie Manchot, Yoko Ono, Adrian Piper, Simon Pope and Kryzysztov Wodiczko.

Situation–a unique set of conditions produced in both space and time and ranging across material, social, political, and economic relations–has become a key concept in twenty-first-century art. Rooted in artistic practices of the 1960s and 1970s, the idea of situation has evolved and transcended these in the current context of globalization. This anthology offers key writings on areas of art practice and theory related to situation, including notions of the site specific, the artist as ethnographer or fieldworker, the relation between action and public space, the meaning of place and locality, and the crucial role of the curator in recent situation specific art. In North America and Europe, the site-specific is often viewed in terms of resistance to art’s commoditization, while elsewhere situation-specific practices have defied institutions of authority. The contributors discuss these recent tendencies in the context of proliferating international biennial exhibitions, curatorial place-bound projects, and strategies by which artists increasingly unsettle the definition and legitimation of situation-based art.Artists surveyed include [from Ian 1/30]Vito Acconci, Allora & Calzadilla, Francis Alÿs, Carl Andre, Artist Placement Group, Michael Asher, Amy Balkin, Ursula Biemann, Bik Van der Pol, Daniel Buren, Victor Burgin, Janet Cardiff, Center for Land Use Interpretation, Adam Chodzko, Collective Actions, Tacita Dean, Elmgreen & Dragset, Andrea Fraser, Hamish Fulton, Dan Graham, Liam Gillick, Renée Green, Group Material, Douglas Huebler, Bethan Huws, Pierre Huyghe, Robert Irwin, Emily Jacir, Ilya Kabakov, Leopold Kessler, Július Koller, Langlands & Bell, Ligna, Richard Long, Gordon Matta-Clark, Graeme Miller, Jonathan Monk, Robert Morris, Gabriel Orozco, Walid Ra’ad, Raqs Media Collective, Paul Rooney, Martha Rosler, Allen Ruppersberg, Richard Serra, Situationist International, Tony Smith, Robert Smithson, Vivan Sundaram, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Lawrence Weiner, Rachel Whiteread, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Qiu Zhijie Writers include Arjun Appaduri, Marc Augé, Wim Beeren, Josephine Berry Slater, Daniel Birnbaum, Ava Bromberg, Susan Buck-Morss, Michel de Certeau, Douglas Crimp, Gilles Deleuze, T. J. Demos, Rosalyn Deutsche, Thierry de Duve, Charles Esche, Graeme Evans, Patricia Falguières, Marina Fokidis, Hal Foster, Hou Hanrou, Brian Holmes, Mary Jane Jacob, Vasif Kortun, Miwon Kwon, Lu Jie, Doreen Massey, James Meyer, Ivo Mesquita, Brian O’Doherty, Craig Owens, Irit Rogoff, Peter Weibel

At this point in art time, new media work needs no longer be prefixed by “new.” With a firm place in institutional and private collections, with an ever-burgeoning range of practitioners, media art can safely be considered a part of the contemporary canon. And hence Fast Forward, a hefty, thorough reference guide, a virtual catalogue raisonné of the medium, from works found in the Goetz Collection. Over 180 film and video works by almost 80 international artists are represented, including: Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Doug Aitken, Chantal Akerman, Francis Alÿs, Emmanuelle Antille, Kutlug Ataman, Matthew Barney, Andrea Bowers, Janet Cardiff / George Bures Miller, Tacita Dean, Rineke Dijkstra, Stan Douglas, Tracey Emin, Peter Fischli / David Weiss, Douglas Gordon, Rodney Graham, Mona Hatoum, Teresa Hubbard / Alexander Birchler, Pierre Huyghe, Annika Larsson, Sharon Lockhart, Steve McQueen, Bjørn Melhus, Arnout Mik, Tracey Moffatt, Sarah Morris, Gabriel Orozco, Tony Oursler, Paul Pfeiffer, Jeroen de Rijke / Willem de Rooij, Pipilotti Rist, Santiago Sierra, Beat Streuli, Sam Taylor-Wood, Diana Thater, Wolfgang Tillmans, Rosemarie Trockel, and Gilian Wearing. The book is rounded off with introductory essays by Peter Weibel, Stephan Urbaschek, Mark Nash, and Sabine Himmelsbach, plus short essays on individual artists, and bibliographic and technical information.

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