William Kentridge’s recent work is situated on the border between art and science: by examining our perception and understanding of time, he reconsiders the creative process. A work in progress in the truest sense, The Refusal of Time continues and deepens the polymorphic, dreamlike, political and humanist body of work developed by Kentridge from his very earliest days as an artist. An installation with performance elements, The Refusal of Time was conceived by Kentridge and science historian Peter Galison for Documenta 13, and realized in collaboration with video filmmaker Catherine Meyburgh and composer Philip Miller, both of whom worked with Kentridge and Galison for a year. Time in its various manifestations–narrative, fragmented, slowed down and speeded up; distortions of space-time; simultaneity–is explored through various media, including dance, film, music and spoken word. The book itself is a work of art; it includes sketches and notebooks, all the texts read during the performance, pictures from the rehearsals and workshop as well as highlights of the show, interviews and drawings created specially for it by Kentridge.

Wanderlust highlights artists as voyagers who leave their studios to make art. This book (and the exhibition it accompanies) is the first comprehensive survey of the artist’s need to roam and the work that emerges from this need. Wanderlust presents the work of under-recognized yet pioneering artists alongside their well-known counterparts, and represents works that vary in process, with some artists working as solitary figures implanting themselves physically on the landscape while others perform and create movements in a collaborative manner or in public.

Many of the earlier works use what were at the time nontraditional methods of art making. In Trail Markers (1969), for example, Nancy Holt spent time in the English countryside, where she documented the painted orange trail markers she found dotting the landscape. Vito Acconci explored his body’s “occupancy” of public space through the execution of preconceived actions or activities. In Following Piece (1969), Acconci followed one randomly chosen stranger through the streets of New York. A Line Made by Walking (1967), a black-and-white photograph of Richard Long’s imprint of a straight line in a field, was Long’s first walking art work, made on a journey to St Martin’s from his home in Bristol. Ana Mendieta’s influential Silueta Works in Mexico (1977) documents performances by the artist during her travel between Iowa and Mexico, in which she imprints her body on the landscape while addressing issues of displacement.

Each of these works recognizes the walk and the journey as much more than just a basic human act. Rebecca Solnit observes that walking replicates thinking, adding “the motions of the mind cannot be traced, but those of the feet can.” These works trace the motions of wandering artists’ focused minds.

Artists include Vito Acconci, Bas Jan Ader, Nevin Aladag, Francis Alÿs, Janine Antoni, John Baldessari, Kim Beck, Roberley Bell, Blue Republic, Sophie Calle, Rosemarie Castoro, Cardiff/Miller, Zoe Crosher, Fallen Fruit, Mona Hatoum, Nancy Holt, Kenneth Josephson, William Lamson, Richard Long, Marie Lorenz, Mary Mattingly, Anthony McCall, Ana Mendieta, Teresa Murak, Wangechi Mutu, Efrat Natan, Gabriel Orozco, Carmen Papalia, John Pfahl, Pope.L, Teri Rueb, Michael X. Ryan, Todd Shalom, Mary Ellen Strom, and Guido van der Werve. 

Contributors Rachel Adams, Lucy Ainsworth, Andrew Barron, Pamela Campanaro, Andy Campbell, Hannah Cattarin, Ian Cofre, Jamie DiSarno, Katherine Finerty, Joshua Fischer, Natalie Fleming, Melanie Flood, Jason Foumberg, Allison Glenn, Kate Green, Ross Stanton Jordan, Anna Kaplan, Jamilee Lacy, Jennie Lamensdorf, Toby Lawrence, Jane McFadden, Lynnette Miranda, Conor Moynihan, Liz Munsell, Karen Patterson, Ariel Lauren Pittman, Sean Ripple, Eve Schillo, Holly Shen, Rebecca Solnit, Lexi Lee Sullivan, Whitney Tassie, Charlie Tatum, Zoë Taleporos, Lori Waxman

Contributors include Tennessee Williams interviewed by Jeff Goldberg with photos, Brown Miller, Roxy Powell, T.L. Kryss, A.D. Winans, Steve Richmond, Janine Pommy-Vega, Gerard Malanga (Photographs), Douglas Blazek, Claude Pelieu (Cover Collage)

The chance situation or random eventówhether as a strategy or as a subject of investigationóhas been central to many artists’ practices across a multiplicity of forms, including expressionism, automatism, the readymade, collage, surrealist and conceptual photography, fluxus event scores, film, audio and video, performance, and participatory artworks. But whyóa century after Dada and Surrealism’s first systematic enquiriesódoes chance remain a key strategy in artists’ investigations into the contemporary world?

The writings in this anthology examine the gap between intention and outcome, showing it to be crucial to the meaning of chance in art. The book provides a new critical context for chance procedures in art since 1900 and aims to answer such questions as why artists deliberately set up such a gap in their practice; what new possibilities this suggests; and why the viewer finds the art so engaging.

Artists surveyed include: Vito Acconci, Bas Jan Ader, Francis Alys, William Anastasi, John Baldessari, Walead Beshty, Mark Boyle, George Brecht, Marcel Broodthaers, John Cage, Sophie Calle, Tacita Dean, Stan Douglas, Marcel Duchamp, Brian Eno, Fischli & Weiss, Ceal Floyer, Huang Yong Ping, Douglas Huebler, Allan Kaprow, Alison Knowles, Jiri Kovanda, Jorge Macchi, Christian Marclay, Cildo Meireles, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Yoko Ono, Gabriel Orozco, Cornelia Parker, Robert Rauschenberg, Gerhard Richter, Daniel Spoerri, Wolfgang Tillmans, Keith Tyson, Jennifer West, Ceryth Wyn Evans, La Monte Young

Writers include: Paul Auster, Jacquelynn Baas, Georges Bataille, Daniel Birnbaum, Claire Bishop, Guy Brett, Benjamin H. D. Buchloh, Stanley Cavell, Lynne Cooke, Fei Dawei, Gilles Deleuze, Anna Dezeuze, Russell Ferguson, Branden W. Joseph, Siegfried Kracauer, Jacques Lacan, Susan Laxton, Sarat Maharaj, Midori Matsui, John Miller, Alexandra Munroe, Gabriel Perez Barreiro, Jasia Reichardt, Julia Robinson, Eric L. Santner, Sarah Valdez, Katharina Vossenkuhl

Documents of Contemporary Art series
Copublished with Whitechapel Gallery, London

The multilayered, fragmented, postmodern style of graphic design revolutionized by desk-top computing has run its course. Anything that could be tried has been tried. Graphic design today has entered a new period, one of greater experimentation that often takes place outside the commercial realm and forces us to reconsider what we have taken as a given. What has emerged is a radical body of work that is rapidly redefining the very nature and scope of design. As presented in this dynamic international showcase of the world’s hottest thirty-seven studios, three sensibilities characterize this avant-garde: “Code,” “Generic,” and “Disjunction.” “Code” looks at the innovative ways designers, tired of using the computer as a tool with applications that are analogues to conventional media, are becoming programmers, unleashing the computer’s processing powers to discover new worlds of extreme beauty. Designers in “Generic” confront the ordinary to offer us an offbeat system of signs, symbols, and meanings that are still strangely familiar. Finally, “Disjunction” considers work that appropriates anything to advance its own, often self-interested aims, whether they be political, social, aesthetic, or even personal. All of these approaches respond in their different ways to the problems facing the graphic designer, and while none endeavors to set out a single systematic solution for design, many suggest unexpected and entirely original ways to communicate images and words. In the ever-shifting realm of contemporary culture, Restart offers a new grid. With over 600 illustrations in color and black and white. Contributors: Joshua Berger/Plazm; Paul Farrington/Tonne; Henrik Kubel + Scott Williams; Andreas Lauhoff; John Maeda; Sara Maconkey; Norm; Ralph Steinbrüchel; Stefanie Barth; Tomato Interactive; Bump; Anthony Burrill; Paul Elliman; Miles Murray Sorrell (Fuel); Graphic Thought Facility; Müller + Hess; Paul Plowman; Jake Tilson; 2×4; Alexander Boxill; Peter Anderson; Irma Boom; Darren Hughes; Angus Hyland; Scott King; Mitsuo Katsui; M/M; Bruce Mau; Ellen Lupton and J. Abbott Miller; Mevis + van Deursen; One9ine; Paul Sahre; Peters Saville; Frank Philippin; Cornel Windlin; Ian Wright and Bob Wilkinson; Michael Worthington

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