Catalogue that includes three essays on the work of Robert Motherwell and comments on the seventy-nine works on display, made between 1941 and 1990, based on conversations with the artist himself: from the first collages and drawings in sepia from his notebook inspired by James Joyce, to the various versions of Elegy to the Spanish Republic

In the years immediately following World War II, Black Mountain College, an unaccredited school in rural Appalachia, became a vital hub of cultural innovation. Practically every major artistic figure of the mid-twentieth century spent some time there: Merce Cunningham, Ray Johnson, Franz Kline, Willem and Elaine de Kooning, Robert Motherwell, Robert Rauschenberg, Dorothea Rockburne, Aaron Siskind, Cy Twombly—the list goes on and on. Yet scholars have tended to view these artists’ time at the College as little more than prologue, a step on their way to greatness. With The Experimenters, Eva Díaz reveals the importance of Black Mountain College—and especially of three key teachers, Josef Albers, John Cage, and R. Buckminster Fuller—to be much greater than that.

Díaz’s focus is on experimentation. Albers, Cage, and Fuller, she shows, taught new models of art making that favored testing procedures rather than personal expression. These methodologies represented incipient directions for postwar art practice, elements of which would be sampled, and often wholly adopted, by Black Mountain students and subsequent practitioners. The resulting works, which interrelate art and life in a way that imbues these projects with crucial relevance, not only reconfigured the relationships among chance, order, and design—they helped redefine what artistic practice was, and could be, for future generations.

Offering a bold, compelling new angle on some of the most widely studied creative figures of modern times, The Experimenters does nothing less than rewrite the story of art in the mid-twentieth century.

A collection of artists’ books by: Marina Abramovic, Carl Andre, Robert Barry, Douglas Huebler, Joseph Kosuth, Robert Morris, Ida Applebroog, Armando, Sophie Taeuber-Arp, Jean Arp, Richard Artschwager, Enrico Baj, Guido Ballo, John Baldessari, Miroslaw Balka,Balthus, Georg Baselitz, Marius Bauer, Merina Beekman, Joseph Beuys, Marcel Broodthaers, David Bunn, Chris Burden, Eduardo Chillida, Catherine Claeyé, Francesco Clemente, Chuck Close, Jean Cocteau, George Hugnet, Bruce Conner, Michael Craig-Martin, Olafur Eliasson, Max Ernst, Yves Tanguy, Tristan Tzara, Anya Gallaccio, Ryan Gander, Alberto Giacometti, Gilbert & George, Pim van Halem, Jonathan Hammer, Sjoerd Hofstra, John Billingham, Jörg Immendorf, Xu Pei, Rein Jansma, Jasper Johns, Ellsworth Kelly, Paul Klee, Jannis Kounellis, Barbara Kruger, Stephen King, André Lanskoy, Henri Laurens, Richard Long, Kasper Andreasen, Tine Melzer, Christien Meindertsma, Sophie Calle , Constant Nieuwenhuys / Gerrit Kouwenaar, Guiseppe Penone, Sigmar Polke, Ken Price / Charles Bukowski, Robert Rauschenberg, David Sandlin, Koosje Schmeddes, Sean Scully, Kiki Smith, Nicolas de Staël, Antoni Tàpies, Andrea Tippel, Richard Tuttle, Damian van der Velden, herman de vries, Hans Waanders, Kara Walker, Alicja Werbachowska, Christopher Wool, Raymond Pettibon, Paul Éluard, Marino Marini, Alicia Martin, Paul McCarthy, Jason Roades, Jack Milroy, René Char, Henry Moore, Robert Motherwell, Octavio Paz, Roman Ondak, Henk Peeters, Edward Ruscha, Man Ray, Louise Bourgeois, Sonia Delaunay, Wassily Kandinsky, Ellsworth Kelly, Joan Miró, Fernand Leger, Sol LeWitt, Henry Matisse, A.R. Penck, Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol and Lawrence Weiner.

One of the premier institutions of contemporary art in the country, the Walker Art Center also holds an important collection of over 11,000 objects from the early 20th century to the present. These holdings reflect the Center’s renowned multidisciplinary program, and include paintings, sculpture, prints, photography, film, video, installations, and digital arts that range in date from classic early modernist to cutting edge contemporary. While aiming to represent the immense diversity in art-making around the world, the collection also is known for several areas of specialty including Minimalism, Arte Povera, Fluxus, and contemporary printmaking. In-depth representations of work by individual artists, including Matthew Barney, Joseph Beuys, Merce Cunningham, Jasper Johns, William Klein, Robert Motherwell, and Kara Walker reflect the Center’s long and close relationships with many of the century’s most creative minds. Showcased in this stunning, expansive, well-designed volume are more than 650 beautifully reproduced works of art. Co-authored by the Walker’s curators and staff, and more than 30 Walker alumni, this book draws heavily on Walker archival material to serve as both a history of the institution and a primer on modern and contemporary art. Adding further dimension to the polyvocal, multifaceted rendition of this dynamic public art center are contributions from a select group of acclaimed writers including, A.S. Byatt, Joshua Clover, Arthur Danto, Dave Eggers, Darby English, Annie Proulx, David Shapiro, and others. The catalogue is published in conjunction with the Spring 2005 re-opening of the newly expanded Walker Art Center. Artists include Matthew Barney, Chuck Close, Bruce Conner, Joseph Cornell, Merce Cummingham, Dan Flavin, Robert Gober, Dan Graham, David Hockney, Donald Judd, Ellsworth Kelly, William Klein, Sherrie Levine, Sol Lewitt, Roy Lichtenstein, Sharon Lockhart, Kerry James Marshall, Bruce Nauman, Isamu Noguchi, Claes Oldenburg, Raymond Pettibon, Richard Prince, Charles Ray, Edward Ruscha, Cindy Sherman, Lorna Simpson, Kiki Smith, Frank Stella, Kara Walker, Andy Warhol, and many others. Edited by Joan Rothfuss and Elizabeth Carpenter. Essays by Elizabeth Alexander, A.S. Byatt, Dave Eggers, Arthur C. Danto, Wayne Koestenbaum, James Lingwood, Linda Nochlin, Annie Proulx, David Shapiro, Charles Simic, Howard Singerman, Hamza Walker et al.

It was at Black Mountain College that Merce Cunningham formed his dance company, John Cage staged his first “happening,” and Buckminster Fuller built his first dome. Although it lasted only twenty-four years (1933-1957) and enrolled fewer than 1,200 students, Black Mountain College launched a remarkable number of the artists who spearheaded the avant-garde in America of the 1960s. The faculty included such diverse talents as Anni and Josef Albers, Eric Bentley, Ilya Bolotowsky, Robert Creeley, Willem de Kooning, Robert Duncan, Lyonel Feininger, Paul Goodman, Walter Gropius, Franz Kline, Robert Motherwell, and Charles Olson. Among the students were Ruth Asawa, John Chamberlain, Francine du Plessix Gray, Kenneth Noland, Arthur Penn, Robert Rauschenberg, Kenneth Snelson, Cy Twombly, Stan Vanderbeek, and Jose Yglesias.In this definitive account of the arts at Black Mountain College, back in print after many years, Mary Emma Harris describes a unique educational experiment and the artists and writers who conducted it. She replaces the myth of the college as a haphazardly conceived venture with a portrait of a consciously directed liberal arts school that grew out of the progressive education movement. Proceeding chronologically through the four major periods of the college’s history, Harris covers every aspect of its extraordinary curriculum in the visual, literary, and performing arts.

At a time when the notion of the book is challenged by the advent of the screen and computer, Blood on Paper aims to show the extraordinary ways in which the book has been treated by leading artists of the past century. Focusing on new and contemporary work and on books where the artist has been the driving force in conception and design, this innovative book comprises a series of unbound booklets presented in a box. Almost all notable artists of the 20th and 21st centuries have produced books, or works that refer to books: those represented will include artists as diverse as Matisse, Picasso, David Hockney, Damien Hirst, Richard Long, Robert Motherwell and many others whose names are synonymous with art today.

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